CollectionsAgriculture
IN THE NEWS

Agriculture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 20, 2006 | By Michael Klein, Tom Avril and Alletta Emeno INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Months after the Pennsylvania auditor general criticized health departments for not making restaurant inspection reports public, the Philadelphia Department of Health yesterday began posting the information on the Web. The city posted reports of what it described as serious violations of the health code, including mouse and fly infestations, in food-service establishments in 2004 and 2005. Among the restaurants cited for various infractions were the well-known White Dog Cafe in West Philadelphia, and Matyson, Alma de Cuba, and Susanna Foo in Center City.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Blake Nicholson, Associated Press
BISMARCK, N.D. - Voters in heavily agriculture-dependent North Dakota became the first to enshrine in their state constitution the right to farm, a move that some say could have far-reaching effects on genetic modification, land use, and the way animals are raised. The amendment approved Tuesday guarantees the right of farmers to engage in "modern" agriculture and bars any law limiting their right "to employ agricultural technology, modern livestock production, and ranching practices.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a bird with its wings spread out to catch wind, the drone glides effortlessly over expansive farm fields, harvesting gigabytes of data while following a preplanned flight path. Does the crop need fertilizer? Is it getting enough water? Are there signs of insect infestation? Is it time for pesticides and weed killers? In a single day, information is collected by sensors, interpreted by computer programs, then provided to the grower through photos and color-keyed maps of the land.
NEWS
December 22, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sonja Hillgren Downs, 58, a renowned journalist who specialized in farming and agriculture, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at home in Center City. Under the byline of Sonja Hillgren, she broke such stories as the Reagan administration's plan to count ketchup as a vegetable in school food programs, and the farm crisis in the early 1980s. Growing up in Sioux Falls, S.D. - in a home where politics was breakfast conversation, her father, Ralph Hillgren, was a newspaperman, state legislator and farm owner - she gravitated to farm journalism early in her career.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | By Jonathan Gelb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A decade ago, students in the vocational agriculture program at Owen J. Roberts High School learned about milk and crop production, skills they applied upon graduation to the myriad farms that dotted the fertile hills around here. Now those farms are mostly gone, and so is traditional agriculture education. Subjects now include landscaping, horticulture, floral arranging, animal and pet care, forestry and environmental conservation. "Production-based agricultural education was not working," said Peg Tinder, an agriculture teacher.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling for a "radical transformation" of the Soviet farm system, Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday opened a crucial Communist Party meeting by proposing that the agriculture super-ministry he created three years ago be abolished. The Soviet leader also called for collective and state farms to be drastically redesigned to be run as cooperatives by groups of leaseholders. The speech concluded the first day of a two-day plenary meeting of the Central Committee, whose 307 members officially set party policy.
NEWS
September 20, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
America's food supply is vulnerable to an agricultural bioterrorist attack, and the United States is unable to prevent it, poorly equipped to spot it, and not prepared to respond to it, the National Academy of Sciences said yesterday. "The nation has inadequate plans to deal with agricultural bioterrorism," said the 174-page report by 14 of the nation's top veterinary, plant, disease, insect, biology, genetics and bioterrorism scientists. The scientists, who defined the threat as "low-tech, high-impact bioterrorism," praised the Bush administration for realizing there was such a problem and trying to address it quickly.
NEWS
January 20, 1986 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deep inside a new laboratory near Trenton, beyond the lobby where an 8-foot ceramic praying mantis hangs on the wall, about 10,000 tiny wasps are flying around inside pickle jars. Imported from Colombia, the wasps are smaller than gnats and harmless - unless you happen to be a Colorado potato beetle. In fact, agriculture officials say, the wasps could wipe out enough beetles to save New Jersey farmers millions of dollars, while eliminating the need for spraying fields in the state with thousands of pounds of potentially dangerous pesticides.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blakey T. Deal, 76, of Wynnewood, a veterinarian who made house calls, died Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Deal, a 5-foot-11 blond with a cleft chin, included among his many clients two former mayors, Frank L. Rizzo and Richardson Dilworth. "I used to tell him he worked like a country doctor," said his wife of 48 years, Eleanor McEwing Deal. "He had a big heart. " On one of those house calls, Dr. Deal attended to a Tennessee walking horse of Rizzo's that had come up lame.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Port Antonio, Jamaica, they know plenty about tropical fruits and vegetables. In Doylestown, the specialities are agribusiness and entrepreneurship. But in the next few years, agriculture students and faculty in these distant locations will become more proficient in areas they now know little about. Delaware Valley College in Doylestown Township is launching an extensive exchange program with the College of Agriculture in Port Antonio to share information and broaden its international outreach.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a bird with its wings spread out to catch wind, the drone glides effortlessly over expansive farm fields, harvesting gigabytes of data while following a preplanned flight path. Does the crop need fertilizer? Is it getting enough water? Are there signs of insect infestation? Is it time for pesticides and weed killers? In a single day, information is collected by sensors, interpreted by computer programs, then provided to the grower through photos and color-keyed maps of the land.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On horseback - where she loves to be - Kirsten Jeansson wears a serious, but not somber, expression. She's focused on her trainer, Alison Newman, and especially on Daniel, the 17-year-old Dutch Warmblood she regularly rides at the Gleneayre Equestrian Program in Lumberton. "I'm so concentrated when I'm riding, because Daniel is such a great teacher," Kirsten, 16, explains. "I try to learn from him and ride my best for him. " Her bond with Daniel has helped Kirsten win equestrian titles, as well as other honors; on Nov. 1, the Seneca High School junior was selected from among seven candidates as New Jersey's Agricultural Fair Ambassador for 2015.
NEWS
October 28, 2014
ISSUE | PLATFORMS Read up on it As far as his plan to improve Pennsylvania's taxes and expenditures, Tom Wolf has said over and over that he'd have to see the figures before he could comment. But the state's tax receipts and expenditures are online, and they're listed in enough detail that Wolf could give at least a cogent answer to these questions. As a past state revenue secretary, he's also familiar with state budgets. And as a candidate, he should certainly have done some current research.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based Chemtura Corp. has agreed to sell its agricultural-chemicals division for about $1 billion to Platform Specialty Products Corp., which is backed by hedge-fund manager Bill Ackman. The deal, for $950 million in cash and two million Platform shares, is the latest in a U.S. chemical industry pressured by hedge-fund managers and activist shareholders to streamline businesses and boost shareholder returns. Wilmington-based DuPont plans to separate its legacy chemical portfolio from its faster-growing seed businesses.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you want to buy an agricultural chemical business? Not everybody does. But if you do, hurry. Chemtura Inc., a member of the Philly 50 list of companies with headquarters in the area and the highest market capitalizations, is continuing to restructure and is selling its division that produces chemicals that help grow food. In 2013, that division produced $449 million in sales, a bit more than 20 percent of the company's total of $2.2 billion. But it is, apparently, beyond the core of what Chemtura does well or wants to do. Though he offered no specifics, chief executive officer Craig Rogerson told financial analysts Feb. 25 Chemtura was in the second round of bids for what it calls its AgroSolutions business.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Dr. Keith Hamilton, For The Inquirer
Since penicillin was introduced in the 1940s, antibiotics have transformed the way we live, turning potentially perilous strep throats and scraped knees into minor annoyances. Now the effectiveness of antibiotics is being threatened by new forms of drug-resistant bacteria, "superbugs," that are immune to many, if not all, of the antibiotics we have to treat them. More than two million Americans develop antibiotic-resistant infections each year, and at least 23,000 die, concluded a report last month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In 2008, undercover videotapes made by The Oprah Winfrey Show exposing inhumane treatment of dogs in Pennsylvania's so-called puppy mills helped drive the passage of the nation's toughest kennel law. Similar videos depicting conditions in large-scale agriculture operations across the nation have led to animal-cruelty charges and changes in laws. In recent years, forces in the industry have pushed back, promoting legislation to criminalize undercover videotaping or photographing of farm operations.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
T O MARK Earth Day, we talk with Dean Carlson, 41, of Elverson, Chester County, owner of the 360-acre Wyebrook Farm in Honey Brook. He practices sustainable agriculture and supplies the public - including several top restaurants - with grass-fed pork, chicken and beef. The former bond trader bought the foreclosed property in 2010 for $12,000 per acre. Q: How do you go from Wall Street trader to farmer? A: I got interested in agriculture as an investment because farmland is going to become more valuable over time.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack is scheduled to visit King of Prussia on Friday for the opening of a new industrial-sugars production facility and to announce $7 million in funding for biofuels research at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Eastern Regional Research Center in Wyndmoor. The new unit at Renmatix Inc. is designed to convert materials such as wood, agricultural residue, some types of grass, and other waste materials that do not compete with the food supply into sugars that can be further processed into industrial chemicals.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|