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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | By Ginny Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Linda Loyd and Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
Edward I. Savitz, 51, the meek Center City actuary whose bizarre sexual fetishes made him front page news in Philadelphia and the nation last year, died Saturday of AIDS. Mr. Savitz died at a Philadelphia hospice, where he had been transferred about a week ago by court order. Previously, he had been held in the prison wing of Girard Medical Center. "He's finally at peace and he is no longer tormented by those who accused him of infecting thousands with AIDS," said Barnaby C. Wittels, his lawyer.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | DAILY NEWS PHOTOS BY ANDREA MIHALIK
Some 30,000 people raised a record $1.3 million in yesterday's AIDS walk in Philadelphia. They included (counterclockwise from left) Yaughnda Two Feathers and Jacques English, picking up info; Al Polk, holding photo of brother-in-law who died of AIDS; marchers along Kelly Drive, and Eric Burgos, 9, with photo of his mother, Judy, who also died of AIDS. His sisters are comforted by relatives Corwin and Chris Candelario.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Norman Y. Lono
Participants in a walk-a-thon to aid AIDS patients listen to speakers at Eakins Oval in front of the Art Museum yesterday (right) before setting off on an eight-mile walk along West River Drive. The "From All Walks of Life" event raised pledges totaling at least $100,000 for local AIDS research, education and service organizations, according to organizers. The walk-a-thon was sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Greater Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co. and the Philadelphia Business Journal.
NEWS
October 9, 1987
Secretary of Education William Bennett likes a good fight. He doesn't flinch at telling schools how to teach, parents how to raise their children and Democratic presidential hopefuls how to run their campaigns. He even dabbles in foreign policy by announcing how wonderful the Contras are. But Bennett's current battle with Surgeon General C. Everett Koop is a dangerous exercise in right-wing ideology that may wind up hurting millions of young people. Koop has been the federal government's only straight talker on acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Before setting off on the AIDS Walk yesterday, Christopher Ramos of Center City holds up a poster of his brother at the Art Museum. Ariel Ramos, who had AIDS, died this year.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A former valet to Prince Charles has died from AIDS, a friend and British newspapers said yesterday. Stephen Barry, 37, who served as Charles' valet for 12 years until 1981, died Saturday at St. Stephen's Hospital in London, according to Stephen Hayter, a public relations expert who was a close friend. The hospital confirmed Barry's death, but declined to disclose the cause. A Buckingham Palace spokesman said Barry served as Charles' manservant until he "retired" in 1981.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / J. SCOTT LYONS
IN A BATTLE of the bands held Saturday to benefit the Chester County AIDS Support Services group, Dave Lords of Trinity takes the stage. The event drew 34 bands to the Great Valley Shopping Center to compete for prize money and studio time.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | For The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
More than 400 quilts, hand-sewn by church, school and community groups, schoolchildren and employees of Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, the pharmaceutical company with offices in Collegeville, were donated this month to the organization ABC (At-Risk Baby Crib) Quilts for use by children with AIDS in area hospitals.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Some very basic ideas have shifted in Rutgers-Camden's financial aid philosophy this year. The school used to distribute aid on the basis of both financial need and merit; this year, it uncoupled the two into need-based grants and merit-based scholarships. As the first freshmen enter under the need-based program, Bridging the Gap, the university said first-year student enrollment has grown more than 50 percent, which it attributes largely to the program. "When I started, one of the things I saw was we had first-generation, low-income, working-class families, and the way our structure was set up when it came to even grant aid, it was based on having a merit component with it," said Craig Westman, who joined Rutgers-Camden in 2015 as head of enrollment management.
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Mark Kaplan, For The Inquirer
After an active Sunday spent with his family, Bob Murken started feeling lousy. He assumed he was coming down with the flu that his son had a few weeks earlier. He went to bed, shivering with chills, figuring a night's sleep would help. But in the morning, he felt worse. He was achy, weak, and his fever was climbing. He took Tylenol, drank water to stay hydrated and hoped his illness would be short-lived. Murken, director of legislative affairs for Mayor Kenney, was a key part of the soda tax initiative and hearings were set to begin before City Council.
NEWS
September 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE - Pennsylvania State University plans to ask for $25 million more in state funding next year with hope of avoiding a tuition hike. At a presentation to university trustees Thursday, Penn State president Eric Barron acknowledged the request for $350 million - an 11 percent increase over its current allocation - might be a "stretch. " Barron said the university also will look to make $26 million in cuts for the 2017-18 year. That figure does not include savings the school anticipates from staff reductions as part of a voluntary retirement program announced this month.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Bill Graham was a flamboyant showman who became the most famous music promoter in the world, a key figure in the 1960s San Francisco psychedelic scene known for hobnobbing with the luminaries he gathered for mammoth awareness-raising events like Live Aid , the star-studded 1985 Philadelphia concert for African-famine relief. Graham - whose Fillmore brand of clubs in San Francisco and New York has been replicated by Live Nation in venues all over the U.S., including the Fillmore that opened last year in Fishtown - even died like a rock star.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, STAFF WRITER
By 1987, the terrifying and mysterious new syndrome afflicting gay men had become a deadly epidemic with a name: AIDS. That year, 28,000 Americans would get HIV. One was 19-year-old Brian Sanders, infected by a man in New Hope who got sick shortly afterward. "I thought it was the flu. Then I heard he died three months later. I never really put that together," said Sanders, now 49 and artistic director of the dance-theater company Brian Sanders' JUNK. "Maybe I just never wanted to. " Today, Sanders is marking 30 years of living with HIV - and, with the benefit of perspective, finally putting the pieces together.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - In one of his first acts as Pennsylvania's top law enforcement officer, Attorney General Bruce Beemer has fired two of his predecessor's most controversial hires. Jonathan Duecker, the former chief of staff to Kathleen Kane, and Patrick Reese, Kane's onetime security chief and driver, were terminated Thursday morning, said Jeff Johnson, the office's spokesman. Johnson would not say why the two were dismissed. But the move wasn't unexpected after Kane's resignation and conviction last month on perjury and obstruction charges.
NEWS
August 31, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Loretta DeFazio Taylor did not graduate from college until the year she turned 50, after helping to raise her five children. "She loved going back" to school, said a longtime friend, Joan McKeon. "She loved being educated," McKeon said. "She had not had enough. " The education had its rewards. In the same year in which she graduated, Mrs. Taylor began a career that included working as an aide to the late U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg (D., N.J.). On Tuesday, Aug. 23, Mrs. Taylor, 87, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the retirement community Medford Leas.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
In its latest experiment in higher education, Trenton-based Thomas Edison State University is testing a program that gives federal financial aid to students taking courses with nontraditional providers. Beginning this fall, up to 200 Thomas Edison students will be able to receive federal financial aid for courses taken at Study.com, an online course provider. Students pursuing bachelor of science in business administration or bachelor of arts in liberal studies degrees would enroll with Thomas Edison and then take at least half their degree credits through Study.com.
NEWS
August 16, 2016
ISSUE | HAITI U.S. aid sorely needed It is deplorable that the United States sends military aid to the Dominican Republic and trains its police and border patrol officers, while that Caribbean country has stripped the citizenship of 200,000 Dominican-born Haitians ("No country to call home," Tuesday). In the past year, more than 60,000 people have been deported, while Haiti struggles to recover from a 2010 hurricane. It is time for the United States to give Haiti's economy a boost so its citizens won't need to leave to find jobs.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
By Robert G. Duffett Hillary Clinton recently unveiled her New College Compact. The goal is college affordability by ensuring free tuition at four-year public colleges for every student from families earning $85,000 a year or less. The family income cap would rise to $125,000 by the year 2021. The compact would primarily be funded by the federal government through "new money" appropriations from yet unidentified tax-benefit limitations on high-income taxpayers. State governments, universities, and parents would also be required to contribute.
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