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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | By Ginny Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Linda Loyd and Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
Edward I. Savitz, 51, the meek Center City actuary whose bizarre sexual fetishes made him front page news in Philadelphia and the nation last year, died Saturday of AIDS. Mr. Savitz died at a Philadelphia hospice, where he had been transferred about a week ago by court order. Previously, he had been held in the prison wing of Girard Medical Center. "He's finally at peace and he is no longer tormented by those who accused him of infecting thousands with AIDS," said Barnaby C. Wittels, his lawyer.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | DAILY NEWS PHOTOS BY ANDREA MIHALIK
Some 30,000 people raised a record $1.3 million in yesterday's AIDS walk in Philadelphia. They included (counterclockwise from left) Yaughnda Two Feathers and Jacques English, picking up info; Al Polk, holding photo of brother-in-law who died of AIDS; marchers along Kelly Drive, and Eric Burgos, 9, with photo of his mother, Judy, who also died of AIDS. His sisters are comforted by relatives Corwin and Chris Candelario.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Norman Y. Lono
Participants in a walk-a-thon to aid AIDS patients listen to speakers at Eakins Oval in front of the Art Museum yesterday (right) before setting off on an eight-mile walk along West River Drive. The "From All Walks of Life" event raised pledges totaling at least $100,000 for local AIDS research, education and service organizations, according to organizers. The walk-a-thon was sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Greater Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co. and the Philadelphia Business Journal.
NEWS
October 9, 1987
Secretary of Education William Bennett likes a good fight. He doesn't flinch at telling schools how to teach, parents how to raise their children and Democratic presidential hopefuls how to run their campaigns. He even dabbles in foreign policy by announcing how wonderful the Contras are. But Bennett's current battle with Surgeon General C. Everett Koop is a dangerous exercise in right-wing ideology that may wind up hurting millions of young people. Koop has been the federal government's only straight talker on acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Before setting off on the AIDS Walk yesterday, Christopher Ramos of Center City holds up a poster of his brother at the Art Museum. Ariel Ramos, who had AIDS, died this year.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A former valet to Prince Charles has died from AIDS, a friend and British newspapers said yesterday. Stephen Barry, 37, who served as Charles' valet for 12 years until 1981, died Saturday at St. Stephen's Hospital in London, according to Stephen Hayter, a public relations expert who was a close friend. The hospital confirmed Barry's death, but declined to disclose the cause. A Buckingham Palace spokesman said Barry served as Charles' manservant until he "retired" in 1981.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / J. SCOTT LYONS
IN A BATTLE of the bands held Saturday to benefit the Chester County AIDS Support Services group, Dave Lords of Trinity takes the stage. The event drew 34 bands to the Great Valley Shopping Center to compete for prize money and studio time.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | For The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
More than 400 quilts, hand-sewn by church, school and community groups, schoolchildren and employees of Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, the pharmaceutical company with offices in Collegeville, were donated this month to the organization ABC (At-Risk Baby Crib) Quilts for use by children with AIDS in area hospitals.
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NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
In its latest experiment in higher education, Trenton-based Thomas Edison State University is testing a program that gives federal financial aid to students taking courses with nontraditional providers. Beginning this fall, up to 200 Thomas Edison students will be able to receive federal financial aid for courses taken at Study.com, an online course provider. Students pursuing bachelor of science in business administration or bachelor of arts in liberal studies degrees would enroll with Thomas Edison and then take at least half their degree credits through Study.com.
NEWS
August 16, 2016
ISSUE | HAITI U.S. aid sorely needed It is deplorable that the United States sends military aid to the Dominican Republic and trains its police and border patrol officers, while that Caribbean country has stripped the citizenship of 200,000 Dominican-born Haitians ("No country to call home," Tuesday). In the past year, more than 60,000 people have been deported, while Haiti struggles to recover from a 2010 hurricane. It is time for the United States to give Haiti's economy a boost so its citizens won't need to leave to find jobs.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Wednesday announced a new financial-aid scholarship that will cut nearly in half the cost of college for high-achieving students and could improve the school's competitive edge. The new Gateway Scholarship will offer $30,000 per year for four years and be open to first-year full-time students for fall 2017. To qualify, students must get at least a 1260 combined reading and math score on their SAT or a composite score of 28 on their ACT, and meet college-prep-level course requirements at Ursinus, a liberal arts college in Collegeville with an enrollment of 1,650.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
By Robert G. Duffett Hillary Clinton recently unveiled her New College Compact. The goal is college affordability by ensuring free tuition at four-year public colleges for every student from families earning $85,000 a year or less. The family income cap would rise to $125,000 by the year 2021. The compact would primarily be funded by the federal government through "new money" appropriations from yet unidentified tax-benefit limitations on high-income taxpayers. State governments, universities, and parents would also be required to contribute.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
Kathleen Granahan and Adrian King dated when they were students at Temple Law School. They even lived together for a year or so. They parted as friends, and when she, now Kathleen G. Kane, became attorney general, she named King as her top aide. On Wednesday, at Kane's trial on perjury and obstruction charges, King accused the attorney general of "trying to frame" him. An angry King leveled that charge during a grueling cross-examination by Kane's legal team. He portrayed his former boss and friend as a thin-skinned public official who dodged questions from the media and ignored his warnings not to leak confidential investigative material.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
A former aide to Gov. Christie alleged that the governor lied during a 2013 news conference about his senior staff and campaign manager's involvement in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, according to a court filing. "Are you listening? He just flat out lied about senior staff and [Bill] Stepien not being involved," the aide, Christina Renna, said in a text message to a staffer on Christie's 2013 reelection campaign, according to the filing late Tuesday. The filing - by lawyers for one of the former Port Authority of New York and New Jersey officials charged in the bridge scandal - said Renna's text message was sent to campaign staffer Peter Sheridan while Christie held the Dec. 13, 2013, news conference.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
The lady was a tramp. That was part of her charm. Scarred, a tad surly. An alpha female if there ever was one. Duchess was her name. Liz Hardt, a softie for a tough dog, was smitten. "I fell in love with her immediately," said Hardt, a veterinary nurse. "She was a big, bad dog. " But there was something else. A kind of bond. Hardt was a cancer survivor. Duchess was, too. The pair met through a program that gives new meaning to the saying, "Who rescued whom?" Through the Shelter Canine Mammary Tumor Program, breast tumors are removed from homeless dogs that would otherwise go untreated and quite likely die. The dogs are then put up for adoption.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Audrey R. Davis Crocker, 93, of West Philadelphia, a former seamstress, food worker, and teacher's aide in the Philadelphia School District, died Monday, Aug. 1, of an intestinal ailment at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. Born in Rincon, Ga., to Joseph and Lucille Giles, she moved to Philadelphia as an infant with her family. She was educated in the Philadelphia public schools. She became a Christian at age 8. She joined Second Mt. Zion Baptist Church and stayed faithful to the church over the years.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
ISSUE | MENTAL HEALTH More N.J. aid needed Community mental-health providers are struggling to deliver medication management services to individuals with mental illnesses - and, in many cases, substance-use disorders - because the fee-for-service rates have not been increased. The rates are not being adjusted despite proof that they fall short of the cost and despite the dire consequences for those who need them. By getting these and other outpatient services, individuals would be able to avoid more costly emergency room visits and hospitalizations for behavioral and physical health issues.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
In the middle of contract negotiations with AFSCME District Council 33, Richard Lazer, Philadelphia's point man in the talks, had to deal with another labor issue - his wife giving birth to their second child. With an agreement in sight, Lazer, the deputy mayor for labor, couldn't afford to take time off. "We went to see the baby and Richie was in the kitchen on the phone with [DC33 president] Pete Matthews, saying 'No, we can't do that. I'll see about that,' " said Jim Engler, deputy mayor for policy and legislation and Lazer's brother-in-law.
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