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Aids Testing

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NEWS
February 5, 1987 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A national hospital organization yesterday called a proposal to test all hospital patients for AIDS costly and ineffective, but the American Medical Association indicated that doctors might favor gathering the information. The federal Centers for Disease Control has scheduled meetings Feb. 24 and 25 in Atlanta to hear reaction to its proposals for expanded AIDS testing, which spokesmen have said may be necessary to prevent an epidemic of the fatal, sexually transmitted disease.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Despite recent research showing that the AIDS virus may be carried undetected by conventional testing for as long as three years, a more sensitive test remains a rarely-used diagnostic tool one year after its introduction. The polymerase chain reaction, or PCR test, which detects the virus using gene manipulation, hasn't achieved wider usage for four reasons, according to interviews with AIDS researchers and city officials. The PCR test is expensive and commercially available at only two facilities in the U.S. In certain cases, its results are misleading.
NEWS
February 20, 1987
It isn't surprising that there are those who are protesting the testing for the AIDS virus, because no matter what new rule or regulation is ever made, such as the fairly recent mandatory use of the seat belt, there are protesters. Most of us realize, at some point, if not immediately, that rules and laws are made for our own good or safety. However, for some unexplainable reason, whether it's stubborness or simply deviance, there will be rebellious people. Many children are like that; they won't believe their parents' advice or warning that the stove will burn them or that matches can be harmful.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By JAMES C. LAWSON, Special to the Daily News
After two years of testing, SmithKline Beckman Corp. has unveiled a new blood test for AIDS antibodies that virtually eliminates false positive readings that needlessly terrorize healthy people. The test, Hivagen, was developed by SmithKline's Bio-Sciences Laboratories in King of Prussia. A rival to the widely used Western Blot assay test, which was developed by the Du Pont Co., Hivagen is expected to significantly advance AIDS screening and research and to reduce the confusion associated with AIDS testing.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau (United Press International contributed to this article.)
Two leading liberal Democrats introduced $1.2 billion legislation yesterday to expand voluntary testing for AIDS and authorize $2,000 fines for disclosing results or discriminating against carriers of the virus. The proposal would encourage AIDS testing among such high-risk groups as male homosexuals and intravenous drug users by making blood screening more widely available through local health facilities. Federal spending and counseling programs for AIDS testing, now costing about $70 million, would increase to $400 million in each of the next three years.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop disagrees with Education Secretary William J. Bennett's call for mandatory AIDS testing for hospital patients, immigrants, prisoners and engaged couples. Koop, testifying Friday before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on health and the environment, said mandatory tests for the AIDS virus would not help contain the deadly disease and "would not be good public-health practice at this time. " He predicted that mandatory testing would cause people who risk infection to "stay away" from public health clinics, an opinion shared by most state health officials and gay rights activists.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
A plan to screen illegal aliens for AIDS when they apply for amnesty is being considered by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Those testing positive for exposure to the deadly virus would be barred from the country, said William Zimmer, director of the INS regional processing center in Dallas. Regulations require aliens who ap ply for amnesty under the landmark immigration reform passed last year to submit to a blood test for sexually transmitted diseases, but not one for acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
SPORTS
November 12, 1991 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the aftermath of Magic Johnson's announcement that he has the HIV virus, the Major League Baseball Players Association and the NBA Players Association say they will discuss the possibility of testing athletes for AIDS. The discussions will take place at the unions' next scheduled meetings, representatives of the organizations said yesterday. Although the collective-bargaining agreements for baseball and basketball will not expire until 1993 at the earliest, both unions say the agreements could easily be amended to introduce AIDS testing sooner.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Angered by complaints of surreptitious AIDS-virus testing without adequate counseling, Councilman Angel Ortiz said he plans to introduce an ordinance tomorrow requiring all AIDS testing to comply with federal guidelines on informed consent. In City Council committee hearings, Ortiz said he had heard "time and time again" of people having blood drawn without being told it would be tested for the AIDS virus, being told they were infected - and then being left to cope on their own with the devastating news.
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court today let stand a landmark ruling that barred as unconstitutional mandatory AIDS testing for employees at state facilities for the mentally retarded. At issue was a requirement by a Nebraska state agency that the 400 workers who have close contact with the residents of such facilities be tested for AIDS and hepatitis B, fatal diseases transmitted through blood and semen. The requirement was adopted in 1987 after an employee died of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.
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NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rapid home test for HIV, similar to early pregnancy tests, will be considered by a federal advisory committee on Tuesday, a move that many public health experts believe could eventually help calm Americans' fears of HIV, leading them to view it as just another serious chronic illness. An over-the-counter test offers new hope against an epidemic whose numbers in the United States have hardly budged in more than 15 years. An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of the more than 50,000 new HIV cases annually are transmitted by people who were unaware that they were infected.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2012 | Dan Gross
President Bill Clinton picked up a few books from the bargain and new fiction departments at the Barnes & Noble (102 Park) in Willow Grove Thursday evening before attending a rally for Democratic state Attorney Genereal candidate Kathleen Kane. The visit was a surprise to the store and its customers who certainly took notice of Clinton and his Secret Service detail. Clinton stopped to take a few photos with customers and chat a little bit before heading to Upper Moreland High School for the Kane rally.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Former Gov. Ed Rendell touched off a political skirmish Wednesday when, in a rare trip to the Capitol, he called on his successor to scrap plans to cut off food-stamp recipients based on their assets. Rendell took the stage in the Capitol media center with fellow Democrats to assail the "asset test" proposed by Republican Gov. Corbett's administration as impractical and harmful to lower-income families, the elderly, and the disabled. "Do we want to take away benefits to root out waste, fraud and abuse that doesn't exist?"
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | By Kristen A. Graham and Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A day after Philadelphia schools chief executive Paul Vallas and Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson announced a new approach to attacks against district teachers, the policy faced an immediate test at a school that has been rocked by a series of assaults. Yesterday morning, a nonteaching assistant was trying to clear a hallway at West Philadelphia High School when a student "sucker-punched" him. It was the sixth assault at the school in two weeks and at least the 17th there this year, according to teachers union officials.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. said yesterday that it has curtailed tests of an experimental HIV drug after two patients suffered serious liver damage. The compound, called aplaviroc, is one of a new generation of treatments known as CCR5 antagonists, which scientists say may help people who have become resistant to protease inhibitors like AZT. Pfizer Inc. and Schering-Plough Corp. also have been developing CCR5 antagonist drugs. Neither reported similar adverse events. "It is a little disappointing," said Robert Winn, medical director at the Mazzoni Center in Philadelphia, a nonprofit primary care center.
NEWS
January 9, 2004 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
After dark, it gets pretty raunchy in Vila Mimosa, a hub for cheap sex in Rio, but government posters promoting condom use cut through the red-light district's atmosphere like a whiff of ammonia. "For us the use is almost 100 percent," said Giovania Cabral, a 33-year-old prostitute. Brazil's Health Ministry could not be more pleased. It gave away more than 300 million condoms last year in some high schools as well as places such as Vila Mimosa, hoping to slow the highest AIDS rate in South America.
NEWS
December 12, 2001 | By Jackie Koszczuk INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congressional negotiators reached agreement yesterday on legislation that aims to close the achievement gap between rich and poor schoolchildren in 12 years by making federal aid dependent for the first time upon a school's academic performance. The legislation would be the most sweeping change in federal education policy since 1965 and, if enacted as expected, will be a major victory for President Bush. He campaigned on a promise to improve public schools and called the legislation his top priority until the Sept.
SPORTS
December 24, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Former heavyweight champion Tommy Morrison, who faces drug and weapons charges, is undergoing tests to determine if his HIV has developed into AIDS. Morrison was at Washington Regional Medical Center in Fayetteville, Ark., yesterday at the urging of his attorney, who said he had noticed a recent change in Morrison's physical and mental conditions. Lawyer John Hudson said he asked Washington County jail officials to have Morrison tested to see if his HIV status has changed.
NEWS
September 8, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Al was diagnosed with HIV four years ago and now has full-blown AIDS. He has seen two uncles and many friends die of the illness, he said, and he knows how isolated people with AIDS can be. "When you're dealing with this disease, no one wants to be around you," he said. But now Al, 32, who lives in Sharon Hill and did not want to give his last name, has a place to socialize with people who understand his plight. It's called Night Out, and it is sponsored by the Delaware County AIDS Network.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A funding drought that stirred organizers of the Bucks County Planned Parenthood HIV testing service to predict its probable demise has instead yielded two unexpected victories for the program. The service, which provided free counseling and testing for the AIDS virus to more than 3,000 people during the last three years, has avoided an expected shutdown through two grants of $5,000 each from two groups - the Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation of Philadelphia and Fighting AIDS Continuously Together, or FACT, of Bucks County.
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