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Air Carrier Access Act

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NEWS
March 15, 1988 | BY EDWARD JOHN HUDAK
For as long as any of us can remember, commercial airlines have been been no friend to the disabled passenger. With this in mind, I always check the train schedules first before embarking on a long journey. However, last year, the U.S. Congress gave the disabled air passenger a new lease on life in the skies by passing the Air Carrier Access Act, ostensibly ending discrimination against disabled passengers forever. It is my sad duty to report that this is not the end of bad treatment, embarrassing scenes and undignified confrontations between handicapped fliers and agents of the airlines.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The U.S. Department of Transportation has charged Continental Airlines with discriminating against disabled passengers, a violation of the Air Carrier Access Act. Three formal complaints by passengers were cited in an Aug. 16 announcement by the DOT's office of aviation enforcement. They allege that during flights in 1997 and 1998, the airline failed to provide adequate assistance to wheelchair-dependent passengers in boarding and leaving aircraft. Two of the complaints also charged that Continental failed to stow the passengers' wheelchairs in the passenger compartment as required by DOT rules.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | BY EDWARD JOHN HUDAK
For someone with a physical disability, getting on a commercial airliner can be like jumping off the Sears Tower with a bungee cord around the ankles. Once airborne, the handicapped person's freedom is usually subject to forces beyond his or her control. A flood of complaints to the Federal Aviation Administration about discriminatory treatment of disabled air travelers resulted in Congress passing the Air Carrier Access Act of 1986. The law says commercial airlines in the United States cannot discriminate in the way they serve disabled passengers.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for radio host Daniel Gottlieb and American Airlines said yesterday that they have reached an out-of-court settlement in Gottlieb's dispute with the airline over whether it violated his rights as a disabled passenger. Details of the confidential settlement were still being worked out, but Gottlieb's lawyer, Stephen F. Gold, called it "a fair and reasonable settlement for both sides . . . that will benefit all people in wheelchairs in the future. " American Airlines's attorney, Timothy Sheridan, declined to give details, and airline spokesman Gus Whitcomb said he could not comment on a settlement that had yet to be signed.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Daniel Gottlieb, a local psychologist, radio host and Inquirer columnist who is paralyzed from the chest down, yesterday agreed to drop his lawsuit accusing American Airlines of discriminating against him because of his disability. In exchange for the out-of-court settlement, Gottlieb is to receive an undisclosed sum of money. Lawyers in the case refused to disclose settlement terms. A jury last week found that the airline hadn't discriminated against Gottlieb on a trip to San Antonio, Texas, in 1994 by failing to provide him with a wheelchair in Dallas to help in making a connecting flight.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Workers who push passengers in wheelchairs at Philadelphia International Airport filed complaints with the U.S. Transportation Department and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) alleging that their employer, PrimeFlight Aviation Services, and three airlines that contract with it failed to provide proper training and equipment to safely do their jobs. The complaints, filed Thursday, allege violations of the federal Air Carrier Access Act and ask the Transportation Department to impose fines and order US Airways, United Airlines, and Southwest Airlines to force PrimeFlight to correct the problems.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Testimony is scheduled to begin today in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia in a case that could force the nation's largest commercial airline to change the way in which it accommodates people with physical disabilities. The case involves Daniel H. Gottlieb, a nationally syndicated radio talk- show host who has sued American Airlines contending that the Fort Worth, Texas-based carrier violated the Air Carrier Access Act by failing to provide a manual wheelchair to transport him between flights at the Dallas-Fort Worth airport in April despite several advance requests.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Air travelers with disabilities are better off now than when the Air Carrier Access Act was passed in 1986, but too often they still get a raw deal from the airlines, according to a report delivered recently by the National Council on Disability. "Obtaining service accommodations continues to be a major challenge at airports, ticketing offices and travel services across the nation," the report said. "When they fly, people with disabilities still face uncertainty about whether air carriers will provide accommodations such as effective communication of flight information, accessible seats, appropriate boarding assistance, and careful handling and stowage of their wheelchairs and other assistive devices.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury is to begin deliberating today the question of whether American Airlines violated the rights of radio host Daniel Gottlieb, who is physically disabled, by not immediately providing a wheelchair for him last April at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. In closing arguments yesterday, Gottlieb's attorney, Stephen Gold, said that "it doesn't matter" what happened to the chair American contends it had reserved for Gottlieb or what the airline did to accommodate him when no chair was available.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Several American Airlines employees testified yesterday in federal court that they did all they could to accommodate radio host Daniel Gottlieb, including delaying his connecting flight to San Antonio, after they had problems getting him a wheelchair at the Dallas-Fort Worth airport last April. Kenneth Bray, an operations agent for American Airlines at the airport, said he heard on a two-way radio, and later through a call from another airline official, that Gottlieb was on his way to the connecting flight after arriving from Philadelphia.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Workers who push passengers in wheelchairs at Philadelphia International Airport filed complaints with the U.S. Transportation Department and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) alleging that their employer, PrimeFlight Aviation Services, and three airlines that contract with it failed to provide proper training and equipment to safely do their jobs. The complaints, filed Thursday, allege violations of the federal Air Carrier Access Act and ask the Transportation Department to impose fines and order US Airways, United Airlines, and Southwest Airlines to force PrimeFlight to correct the problems.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The U.S. Department of Transportation has charged Continental Airlines with discriminating against disabled passengers, a violation of the Air Carrier Access Act. Three formal complaints by passengers were cited in an Aug. 16 announcement by the DOT's office of aviation enforcement. They allege that during flights in 1997 and 1998, the airline failed to provide adequate assistance to wheelchair-dependent passengers in boarding and leaving aircraft. Two of the complaints also charged that Continental failed to stow the passengers' wheelchairs in the passenger compartment as required by DOT rules.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Air travelers with disabilities are better off now than when the Air Carrier Access Act was passed in 1986, but too often they still get a raw deal from the airlines, according to a report delivered recently by the National Council on Disability. "Obtaining service accommodations continues to be a major challenge at airports, ticketing offices and travel services across the nation," the report said. "When they fly, people with disabilities still face uncertainty about whether air carriers will provide accommodations such as effective communication of flight information, accessible seats, appropriate boarding assistance, and careful handling and stowage of their wheelchairs and other assistive devices.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Daniel Gottlieb, a local psychologist, radio host and Inquirer columnist who is paralyzed from the chest down, yesterday agreed to drop his lawsuit accusing American Airlines of discriminating against him because of his disability. In exchange for the out-of-court settlement, Gottlieb is to receive an undisclosed sum of money. Lawyers in the case refused to disclose settlement terms. A jury last week found that the airline hadn't discriminated against Gottlieb on a trip to San Antonio, Texas, in 1994 by failing to provide him with a wheelchair in Dallas to help in making a connecting flight.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for radio host Daniel Gottlieb and American Airlines said yesterday that they have reached an out-of-court settlement in Gottlieb's dispute with the airline over whether it violated his rights as a disabled passenger. Details of the confidential settlement were still being worked out, but Gottlieb's lawyer, Stephen F. Gold, called it "a fair and reasonable settlement for both sides . . . that will benefit all people in wheelchairs in the future. " American Airlines's attorney, Timothy Sheridan, declined to give details, and airline spokesman Gus Whitcomb said he could not comment on a settlement that had yet to be signed.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal jury returned a mixed verdict yesterday in radio host Daniel Gottlieb's civil suit against American Airlines for allegedly violating a federal law that protects physically disabled passengers. The jury found that American Airlines violated Gottlieb's civil rights by failing to give priority to his electric wheelchair on a return flight from San Antonio last year and by damaging the chair during the flight. But the eight-member jury decided that American broke no federal laws pertaining to disabled passengers by failing to immediately provide Gottlieb with a manual wheelchair when he got off a plane in Dallas, on the first leg of his trip.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury is to begin deliberating today the question of whether American Airlines violated the rights of radio host Daniel Gottlieb, who is physically disabled, by not immediately providing a wheelchair for him last April at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. In closing arguments yesterday, Gottlieb's attorney, Stephen Gold, said that "it doesn't matter" what happened to the chair American contends it had reserved for Gottlieb or what the airline did to accommodate him when no chair was available.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Several American Airlines employees testified yesterday in federal court that they did all they could to accommodate radio host Daniel Gottlieb, including delaying his connecting flight to San Antonio, after they had problems getting him a wheelchair at the Dallas-Fort Worth airport last April. Kenneth Bray, an operations agent for American Airlines at the airport, said he heard on a two-way radio, and later through a call from another airline official, that Gottlieb was on his way to the connecting flight after arriving from Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 21, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An American Airlines official testified yesterday in the discrimination case brought by radio host Daniel Gottlieb that its policies require that wheelchairs be provided for all disabled passengers who request them. Whether the airline violated the Air Carrier Access Act by not making a wheelchair readily available for Gottlieb at the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport as he tried to make a connecting flight last April is at the heart of the trial now underway in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Testimony is scheduled to begin today in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia in a case that could force the nation's largest commercial airline to change the way in which it accommodates people with physical disabilities. The case involves Daniel H. Gottlieb, a nationally syndicated radio talk- show host who has sued American Airlines contending that the Fort Worth, Texas-based carrier violated the Air Carrier Access Act by failing to provide a manual wheelchair to transport him between flights at the Dallas-Fort Worth airport in April despite several advance requests.
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