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Air Conditioning

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BUSINESS
August 18, 1995 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
This summer's sweltering heat wave made many homeowners long for central air-conditioning - a luxury in a city where most houses were built before the World War II. These older homes typically use steam or hot-water radiators for heat and are built of solid brick or stone, which makes it difficult and costly to install the bigger, 12-by-28-inch sheet-metal ducts used for conventional central air-conditioning systems. Many all-electric homes built in the '50s and '60s have a similar problem because they were built with radiant baseboard heat.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
The Philadelphia School District said that Potter Thomas Promise Academy SLAM (Summer Learning and More) site will be closed today because of a problem with the air conditioning system. The school is scheduled to reopen Thursday.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
A four-alarm fire that caused about $500,000 in damage early Friday to the Llanerch Country Club in Haverford Township was caused by a malfunction in an air-conditioning unit in the clubhouse ballroom, a county official said. George Lewis, Delaware County Fire Marshal who investigated the fire, said it erupted about 1:45 a.m. in the back of the ground-floor ballroom and engulfed a wooden structure surrounding the air-conditioning unit before spreading to areas next to the ballroom.
REAL_ESTATE
August 12, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Come what may in the waning weeks of summer, most of the Philadelphia region and the rest of the nation are armed to the teeth against an outbreak of heat and humidity. Philadelphia may not be in a climatic league with Houston or Miami, but in the eight-county area two of three homes have air conditioning, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Philadelphia-area figures are comparable to national figures. Not surprisingly, the highest concentration of air conditioning is in the Southern United States, where more than 85 percent of homes have central air conditioning or window air conditioners.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By James Dulley FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: The ducts for our central air-conditioning run through the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. It seems that cold air comes out of them in the winter. Is the chilly breeze my imagination? Answer: It most likely is not your imagination. The air inside the air-conditioning ducts in your attic gets cold and becomes dense. Since it is heavier than the air inside your room, it drops down and you feel it. This can create a substantial energy loss and make you uncomfortable.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | By Peter Binzen
In 1949, Harold E. Stassen, then president of the University of Pennsylvania, faced a tough decision. The Dietrich family (Ludens cough drops) had provided money to help finance construction of a new Wharton School building. The question was: Should it be air-conditioned? Systems that cooled the air indoors were fairly common even then. The U.S. Capitol had been air-conditioned in 1920, and New York's Rockefeller Center in 1932. But money for university expansion was tight in the immediate postwar years.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | By Lisa Borders, Special to The Inquirer
The Council Rock school board Monday night just said no to a $3.5 million bond issue to outfit several of the district's elementary schools with air conditioning. But the district is still considering a bond issue that could total as much as $62.6 million to pay for two new schools, a new administration center, land for future building, asbestos removal and improvements to schools. Assistant Superintendent David P. Blatt presented the board with a list of possible projects, based on a 1988 study of the district's 12 schools by the architectural firm Faridy, Thorne & Maddish of Trenton.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Washington Township school board has voted 5-3 to install $410,000 worth of air conditioning at two new upper-elementary schools, Heritage Valley and Pitman Downer, and at Hurffville Elementary School. On Aug. 23, board members agreed to install the air conditioners during construction, rather than simply installing ducts so that air-conditioning systems could be put in later. The upper elementary schools are under construction, and the elementary school is being renovated.
NEWS
June 13, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It's only June, not officially summer yet, and already it's been broiling hot. If this keeps up, there's little doubt that we'll all see our electricity bills spike. Rising gasoline prices will probably mean fewer escapes to the Shore or the mountains. And for those on fixed incomes, the cost of keeping cool may stretch finances to the limit. With that in mind, and with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy and the nonprofit Alliance to Save Energy, here are some tips for being more efficient as the heat waves roll in. (If you have other ideas, please share.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The air conditioners cooling downtown office buildings are also making sweltering streets even hotter in cities across the country, researchers say. Anyone who has felt the hot blast of an air conditioner's exhaust knows how that happens, but new research suggests that the waste heat from air conditioners can add as much as two degrees to outdoor urban temperatures. For cities already suffering elevated temperatures due to hot roofs, hot pavement and little greenery, using air conditioners makes matters worse, if only for those not cooled by them.
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REAL_ESTATE
September 14, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I had our attic spray-foamed in 2010. Our HVAC contractor recently did a semiannual service. The technician came down from the attic, where he was checking the air handler, and he was wringing wet with sweat. Another technician said we needed an energy consultant to check the spray-foam job since leaks in the foam were likely allowing hot, humid air into the attic. The consultant suggested removing all the batt insulation in the ceiling and redoing the spray foam to totally encapsulate the attic.
REAL_ESTATE
July 27, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: Over the last month, after running the air conditioner in my son's room, we noticed that it smelled like an ashtray. There is no hidden source, like a collection of cigarette butts in his room, so the logical thing was to clean the current air conditioner and see if it still smelled. Long story short, we ran an ionizer in his room when he was at overnight camp and bought a new air conditioner. After running the new air conditioner for two nights, the smell is back.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
BEEN SUFFERING electric (bill) shocks from cranking up the air conditioning? We have ways to reduce the torture. Fanning the flames: Air conditioning is rarely as efficient as users would like. Hot air rises, cold air falls. As sun beats down on the roof, the top floor will always be harder to cool. And no matter how well you "balance" air flow through vents, the side of the house closer to the blower or the side of the room near the window unit will invariably feel colder. Fixing the gaps: With thoughtful placement, a ceiling fan over the sofa or bed and a small, portable fan or two near your window AC unit or central system vents can help a lot to balance the climate zones.
REAL_ESTATE
March 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: In 2012, I wrote about possible solutions to a wet crawl space at my newly acquired home in Mantoloking, and your reply and the input from your readers was helpful. Storm Sandy visited before any corrective measures were taken, and I am working on a much larger problem, since my ranch home took 13 inches of water and is in the process of recovery and hazard mitigation. My question today relates to air conditioners and the claim that salt in the air, fog, and water corrode metal and will reduce the life of the unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
It's been a long and difficult berth for the SS United States. Since 1996, the magnificent ocean liner has been suspended in shabby dormancy, docked on the Delaware River in South Philadelphia while stewards work out plans for its restoration and reuse. Built for luxury and for speed, it fulfilled both ambitions spectacularly after a maiden voyage in 1952, breaking records for eastbound and westbound Atlantic crossings while ferrying presidents, immigrants, and royalty, real and Hollywood.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
HERE in the Upper Midwest, we do battle with Old Man Winter using a two-stage, gas-powered snowblower in every garage. May not need a lawn mower or a leaf blower or air conditioning, but darn sure need a snowblower. It's the first day above 32 degrees here since November, with 8 inches of snow on the ground. We have salt trucks, snowplows, the water company for frozen pipes, so it is not just the power company. Lots of blankets and the fireplace when the power goes out. We ice-fish and play pond hockey, too. We do not listen much to Punxsutawney Phil.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE WEATHER outside is frightful and it's apparently not much better inside for students, faculty and staff at an Overbrook school. Pupils and teachers at Overbrook Educational Center Annex, on Lansdowne Avenue near 68th Street, have not had heat for a week, with temperatures in the building dipping into the 40s, according to a staff member. "The kids are still over there suffering and the principal's in her warm office. She's in the main building," the employee, who asked not to be identified for fear of reprisal, said yesterday.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Rebstock, 59, of Marlton, vice president of a family-owned Philadelphia heating and air-conditioning firm, died of cancer Saturday, Sept. 28, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In 2003, Mr. Rebstock was elected vice president of W. Kramer Associates Inc. after 25 years with the East Falls firm. That was the same year that his brother, Robert, was elected president of the firm. In 1952, the brothers' father, Howard, had joined the Kramer firm. In 1967 he became its president, and in 2003 was named its CEO. The firm develops, installs, and services several types of heating and air-conditioning systems, Robert Rebstock said.
REAL_ESTATE
September 16, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, a rowhouse dweller asked for advice about dealing with cigarette-smoke odor finding its way into her living space from the other side of the party wall. The odor was most noticeable, she said, when the neighbors turned on their central air conditioning. Harris Gross of Cherry Hill, a licensed professional engineer and home inspector, says older homes retrofitted with ductwork for central-air systems often lack sufficient return ductwork, especially on the second floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013
BY THE TIME you read this, the heat wave will be over and I will be free to share the Joneses' dirtiest secret since the time we snuck five boxes of dollar-store Milk Duds into the movies. You see, we've been hiding something that some of you will be shocked to know, having read about the good fortune we've experienced over the years. During the heat wave that hit Philly during early July, our central air-conditioning system died, and we were told that the cost of replacing it would be $5,000.
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