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Air Jordan

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SPORTS
July 31, 1990 | By M.G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
With all the hubbub surrounding the attempt by Nolan Ryan to win his 300th major-league game last week, it was easy to lose track of the achievements of a certain Comiskey Park slugger. And we don't mean Ron Kittle. The slugger we're talking about was none other than Michael Jeffrey Jordan, who continued to amaze the sporting world with his athletic escapades. Allowed to take batting practice before the White Sox played the Cleveland Indians at Comiskey, Jordan launched two home runs off Sox bullpen coach Dave LaRoche - a feat that makes him a better player right now than, well, Steve Jeltz.
SPORTS
November 14, 1986 | By Jere Longman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sports-celebrity business here is definitely a Bear market. Mike Ditka has a book. Jim McMahon has a book. William "The Refrigerator" Perry, no doubt, will soon be out with a book. Probably a big men's cookbook, featuring the Marlon Brando burger, the John Madden mousse and other delectables for those with the approximate size and appetite of developing nations. But these Bears have become a snarling, churlish, unappetizing bunch. Ditka, sounding like a dictator heading off a coup, is threatening to trade a growing list of malcontents.
SPORTS
January 30, 1992 | By Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this article
The most popular man in sports has told his employers to stop selling his image. From now on, Michael Jordan said, only Nike Inc. - and not the NBA - can paste his name and likeness on T-shirts and other apparel. Jordan's decision probably will cost the league millions of dollars in sales. It also is expected to hurt former NBA players, who, under an agreement between the league and its players' association, get an annual pension payment based on sales of NBA merchandise. Instead, the spoils will go to Nike, the Oregon-based footwear and apparel company, and to Jordan himself.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
John Lee showed up for an interview about his sneaker empire wearing a pair of leather loafers. "I'm not in the culture," the 53-year-old president and owner of KicksUSA said unapologetically. But with 30 sneaker and athletic-apparel stores in the Philadelphia area, and plans to double that number in two to three years with an expansion into New York, Lee is most assuredly in the business of serving that culture. It's a fanatical one. A limited-release shoe can trigger iPhonemania-like lines outside athletic-footwear stores like KicksUSA.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice Holoway had been obsessing for six days. On that Monday he had read that the classic Air Jordan IIIs were being rereleased. These were the original red, white, and black kicks first made available to the public in 1988. Holoway, 28, knew he had to get to the store early if he wanted a crack at the $160 shoes. He didn't want to be disappointed. By 7:30 on that Saturday morning, when the UBIQ store opened in the Gallery, Holoway was standing pretty - first in line. For the occasion he wore his Nike Barkley Posite Max Phoenix Suns in rich purple faux crocodile skin with zigzags of bright powder blue and a Nike swoosh in shocking orange that cost him about $250.
SPORTS
November 8, 1996 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Take two megastars and put them in the same movie and it begs the question: Who is bigger, Michael Jordan or Bugs Bunny? Warner Bros. next Friday will release "Space Jam," the long-awaited, full-length film featuring Jordan and Bugs Bunny. Jordan and the Looney Tunes gang are together to grab two audiences. Bugs and friends are for the little kids, Jordan for the older kids. That's the way it was planned, anyway. To test the theory, the Daily News yesterday went to the Greenfield Elementary School, 23rd and Chestnut streets, and polled classrooms in first grade and a fourth grade.
SPORTS
May 25, 1989 | By Jere Longman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The higher he orbits above the NBA, the more of a reluctant astronaut Michael Jordan becomes. "Sometimes I wish I could be Michael Jackson for a day," Jordan has said several times in recent days. "Just for a day. To see how much worse it could get. " Jordan lives a lavish celebrity existence. He earns $3 million a year in salary and more than $5 million from endorsements. He drives a Ferrari, a Mercedes-Benz, a BMW and a Porsche. He has graced the cover of Sports Illustrated and GQ. He appears in television commercials hawking sneakers and breakfast cereal.
SPORTS
November 4, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
People used to line up to buy the newest Air Jordan basketball shoes. This year, sales of the most recent version, which reached stores over the weekend, aren't matching expectations, analysts are saying. Call it another casualty of the NBA lockout. Last night's scheduled opening games were canceled three weeks ago, and the economic impact is mounting. If the lockout isn't resolved soon, the losses could stretch into the billions and affect companies such as Nike Inc., television networks and cities banking on taxes from arenas, analysts told Bloomberg News.
SPORTS
February 6, 1988 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The wind-chill factor on Michigan Avenue was 40 below zero yesterday, and it seemed that every person in Chicago was in the lobby of the Hyatt Regency Hotel to get out of the cold. It was probably just coincidence that they were all trailing Michael Jordan. Pro basketball is being showcased in Chicago this weekend, with the 38th annual NBA All-Star Game set for tomorrow. And Jordan, who is the hottest thing to hit this deep-frozen city since the Chicago Fire - or, at least, the Super Bowl Chicago Bears - is the biggest star of them all. If Jordan doesn't win today's slam-dunk contest, the sellout crowd at Chicago Stadium probably will not be pleased.
SPORTS
January 9, 1991 | By Mike Bruton, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers are going through a particularly tough stretch these days. Consider: When the San Antonio Spurs beat them, 111-102, in overtime Monday night, it was their fifth defeat in the last six games. The Sixers are in the midst of adjusting to the trade that put Armon Gilliam in the starting lineup. The team's captain and the NBA's leading scorer, Charles Barkley, has two sore knees. Manute Bol's car broke down the other day. And now, here comes Michael Jordan.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
John Lee showed up for an interview about his sneaker empire wearing a pair of leather loafers. "I'm not in the culture," the 53-year-old president and owner of KicksUSA said unapologetically. But with 30 sneaker and athletic-apparel stores in the Philadelphia area, and plans to double that number in two to three years with an expansion into New York, Lee is most assuredly in the business of serving that culture. It's a fanatical one. A limited-release shoe can trigger iPhonemania-like lines outside athletic-footwear stores like KicksUSA.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice Holoway had been obsessing for six days. On that Monday he had read that the classic Air Jordan IIIs were being rereleased. These were the original red, white, and black kicks first made available to the public in 1988. Holoway, 28, knew he had to get to the store early if he wanted a crack at the $160 shoes. He didn't want to be disappointed. By 7:30 on that Saturday morning, when the UBIQ store opened in the Gallery, Holoway was standing pretty - first in line. For the occasion he wore his Nike Barkley Posite Max Phoenix Suns in rich purple faux crocodile skin with zigzags of bright powder blue and a Nike swoosh in shocking orange that cost him about $250.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
A MIDDLE-AGED Hispanic man steps out of his car on Aramingo Avenue with an ear-to-ear smile and his hands in the air. It's strange, because the cops never told him to raise his hands. He solicits a couple fist bumps, inexplicably, as he strolls across the street to one of the red chairs reserved for visibly intoxicated drivers awaiting a sobriety test at a recent Port Richmond DUI checkpoint. When police aren't looking, his eyes roll around, but that jovial smile remains plastered on his face.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Jordan, the greatest celebrity product endorser ever, has a new game - and one that is every bit as competitive as the NBA: Fashion. "I'm not afraid of a challenge," Jordan said Tuesday during a private party, at the Bellagio Hotel & Casino, that followed a minifashion show to launch his new Jordan line. "Everybody knows how competitive I am. " Once, he went one on one with guys named Shaq and Bird. Now, he's going up against the Tommys and Calvins of the world.
LIVING
January 17, 1999 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just last weekend, Nike released the latest Air Jordan, the XIV. Even at nearly $150 a pair, there was no shortage of customers. "Air Jordans sell themselves," said Ron Murray, footwear store manager for Just for Feet on Columbus Boulevard. "You really don't have to advertise; folks just want to know when the release date is. " So you would think Michael Jordan's announcement on Wednesday that he was retiring from basketball - the game that made him the best-known sports figure in the world and a multimillion-dollar pitchman - would cause fans to rush out to snap up the rest of the Air Jordan XIVs as a memento of the event, right?
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | By B.J. Kelley
Michael Jordan was to basketball what Baryshnikov was to ballet. Jordan seized the game and made it art. Now that he has announced his retirement, forget for the moment the 10 scoring titles he owns, or the 10-time selection to the All-NBA first team, or the five Most Valuable Player awards, or even the six NBA championships to which he steered the Chicago Bulls. Michael Jordan's game was art - the pure delineation of art that resonates in the same sense as dance or painting or poetry.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Jordan, the Chicago Bulls basketball player who transcended sport to become an iconic figure and one of the world's greatest celebrities, retired yesterday, saying, "I've had fun," and describing this, his second departure from the game, as "99.9 percent" final. Jordan, 35, impeccably attired in a dark suit and joined by his wife, Juanita, bid farewell to a career in which he brought Chicago six NBA championships and earned unprecedented individual honors and stupendous wealth.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United Center, a cavernous arena on the city's West Side, is often called "the house Michael built" - a nod of Ruthian proportion to the legacy of Chicago Bulls superstar Michael Jordan. Today, Michael will leave his house. Today (noon in Philadelphia) at this arena, Jordan is expected to announce the end of an NBA career that included a record 10 scoring titles, two Olympic gold medals, five Most Valuable Player Awards, six MVP honors in the NBA Finals, three consecutive league championships, and six titles in the last eight years.
SPORTS
November 4, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
People used to line up to buy the newest Air Jordan basketball shoes. This year, sales of the most recent version, which reached stores over the weekend, aren't matching expectations, analysts are saying. Call it another casualty of the NBA lockout. Last night's scheduled opening games were canceled three weeks ago, and the economic impact is mounting. If the lockout isn't resolved soon, the losses could stretch into the billions and affect companies such as Nike Inc., television networks and cities banking on taxes from arenas, analysts told Bloomberg News.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sneaker owners lugged bags and boxes filled with their worn castaway shoes to West Philadelphia over the weekend, hoping to resell them as stylish footwear in Japan. Young men there will pay hundreds, and often thousands, of dollars for the privilege of wearing sneakers that already have lost some tread on Philadelphia sidewalks. Most of what they buy are men's shoes, but they'll settle for women's in a pinch. But Japanese chic is exacting, as many would-be sellers discovered when they carried home the same sneakers they had brought to the Sheraton University City.
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