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Air Power

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NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Clashes between government troops and rebels on Tuesday forced the international airport in Aleppo to stop all flights in and out of Syria's largest city, while fierce battles also raged in the suburbs of the capital Damascus. The rebels have been making inroads in the civil war recently, capturing a string of military bases and posing a stiff challenge to the regime in Syria's two major cities - Damascus and Aleppo. The opposition trying to overthrow authoritarian President Bashar al-Assad has been fighting for control of Aleppo since the summer, and it has captured large swathes of territory in Aleppo province west and north of the city up to the Turkish border.
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the Afghan war effort, has renewed orders to American troops to refrain from calling in artillery or air power when battling Taliban forces unless they are certain that no civilians are present. Petraeus' order, the first since he assumed command last month from ousted Gen. Stanley McChrystal, was an effort to fine-tune a McChrystal directive that had angered some U.S. troops, who said the restrictions on the use of artillery and air power exposed them to greater danger.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Gov. Ridge, who fought in Vietnam as an infantryman, criticized NATO and the Clinton administration for not using ground troops in Kosovo. In response to questions during an interview Tuesday, Ridge said there was "no possible, conceivable way" to stop the Serbs' ethnic cleansing with air power alone. "I think we've backed into something pretty horrible. And we've made the situation worse rather than better," said the governor, who served as an infantry staff sergeant in Vietnam from November 1969 to May 1970.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Frank Greve, Inquirer Washington Bureau
All scenarios start this way: If the time comes to attack Iraqi forces, it will be after the sun goes down; after satellites, drones and Air Force F-4 reconnaissance planes have pinpointed Iraqi radars, and after electronic jammers borne by EC-130 aircraft have reduced Iraqi radio communications to static. Then, according to defense analysts and war gaming specialists now devising ways for driving Iraq from Kuwait, U.S. pilots will hurl Harm anti-radar missiles at radars protecting Iraqi airfields, including three inside Kuwait.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The general in charge of all Marine Corps air operations here said yesterday that he had all the air power he needed right now to "fully support" any amphibious assault the Marines might launch. Brig. Gen. Royal N. Moore Jr., commander of the 3d Marine Aircraft Wing based in El Toro, Calif., made it clear that he was speaking hypothetically, that he was not saying the corps would or should conduct any amphibious landing to try to liberate Kuwait from Iraqi occupation. But in recent days, that possibility has come to dominate speculation about the strategy American forces might pursue if President Bush reaches the conclusion that a direct attack on Kuwait is the only way to resolve the crisis in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | By GREG GRANT
If Kuwait is to be liberated and the war brought to a conclusion, the temptation to follow an illusory "bloodless" offensive relying exclusively on air power alone must be avoided. At some point a ground offensive will be required. In fact, victory in a ground war would put the coalition in a strong position in terms of resolving the conflict. The effectiveness of air power is greatly diminished when used against dug- in troops. One thing emerging from the bits of information provided during the Pentagon briefings is the feeling that air strikes against Iraqi forces deployed in the field are less effective than strikes against buildings and fixed military sites.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marooned in the cockpit of his hangar-bound single-engine jet, Steve Snyder looks down at the controls and worries aloud about the future of his favorite country, the United States of America. "Do you know where we're getting most of our software today?" he asks softly and deliberately, squinting in the fluorescent light from under his silver eyebrows and pausing as he rests his arm over the side of the plane. "India. " The answer is meant to disappoint. From Sputnik on, Snyder has taken every military or technology drubbing of America like a kidney shot.
NEWS
March 29, 1999 | BY JAMES OTTAVIO CASTAGNERA
As the Serbian government proves once again its intractable nature and the drumbeats of war are sounded by NATO, I'm ruefully reminded that 85 years ago - not long after the last turn of a century - it was on Serbian soil that World War I began. Archduke Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary was assassinated by a Serb patriot as his motorcade moved through the streets of Sarajevo. Austria-Hungary made demands on Serbia, which amounted to disarmament and abdication of national sovereignty. The Serbs balked, Emperor Franz Josef declared war and the dominoes began to tumble.
NEWS
April 11, 1994
True, American jets under NATO command yesterday bombed Serbian positions outside the besieged Muslim town of Gorazde. But don't be deceived that this military action was the outcome of a coherent U.S. policy. All last week, the Clinton foreign-policy team was performing like an orchestra without a conductor. In the midst of critical negotiations led by a U.S. mediator, Secretary of Defense William Perry last Sunday hit a wildly wrong note. For the next few days, Secretary of State Warren Christopher and National Security adviser Anthony Lake maneuvered furiously to regain a coherent sound.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Many experts believe it will be impossible to rout President Saddam Hussein's troops from Kuwait without launching a bloody ground war, despite repeated and prolonged air strikes at entrenched Iraqi troops. While apparently meeting with some initial success in hitting strategic targets such as communications centers and chemical and nuclear facilities, allied warplanes are likely to have less success in damaging Iraqi Republican guards troops in hidden bunkers or tank units dispersed and dug in across the desert.
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NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syrian troops fought intense battles Saturday against rebels trying to capture two military bases in the northwest in order to step up their attacks on army compounds elsewhere in the country, activists said. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and the Local Coordination Committees said the rebels destroyed at least one tank near the town of Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib province. The rebels, who have been battling for weeks to take control of bases in Wadi Deif and Hamdiyeh, are working to cut off supply routes to the compounds, the Observatory said.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Clashes between government troops and rebels on Tuesday forced the international airport in Aleppo to stop all flights in and out of Syria's largest city, while fierce battles also raged in the suburbs of the capital Damascus. The rebels have been making inroads in the civil war recently, capturing a string of military bases and posing a stiff challenge to the regime in Syria's two major cities - Damascus and Aleppo. The opposition trying to overthrow authoritarian President Bashar al-Assad has been fighting for control of Aleppo since the summer, and it has captured large swathes of territory in Aleppo province west and north of the city up to the Turkish border.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
   BEIRUT, Lebanon - Air strikes by Syrian jets and shells from tanks leveled a neighborhood Tuesday in a restive city near the capital of Damascus, killing 18 people, and at least five rebel fighters died nearby in clashes with regime troops, activists said. The air strikes on the city of Douma, northeast of the capital, left residents scampering over a huge expanse of rubble and using their hands to dig up mangled bodies, according to activist videos posted online. Scenes of vast destruction like those from Douma have grown more common as rebels seeking to topple President Bashar al-Assad have made gains on the ground and as Assad's forces have responded with overwhelming air power.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Hamza Hendawi and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's president fired his intelligence chief on Wednesday for failing to act on an Israeli warning of an imminent attack days before extremists stormed a border post in the Sinai Peninsula and killed 16 soldiers. The dismissal, which followed Egyptian air strikes against Sinai extremists, also marked a bold attempt by the Islamist leader to deflect popular anger over the attack. It pointed to a surprising level of cooperation with the powerful military leaders who stripped the presidency of significant powers just before Mohammed Morsi took office June 30. In a major shake-up, Morsi also asked Defense Minister Hussein Tantawi to replace the commander of the military police, a force that has been heavily used to combat street protests since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak 18 months ago. Rights activists have accused the military police of brutality against protesters.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | Trudy Rubin
Kofi Annan, who's been assigned the hopeless task of resolving the Syrian crisis by diplomacy, is calling for "concerned nations" — including Russia and Iran — to confer this week in Geneva. I sympathize with Annan, now the special Syria envoy of the United Nations and the Arab League. The Bosnian and Rwandan genocides happened while he was head of U.N. peacekeeping, and he desperately wants to prevent further slaughter in Syria. "The longer we wait, the darker Syria's future becomes," he rightly said last week, in a plea for key countries to develop a peace plan.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Lolita C. Baldor and Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - With the end of the Libya mission in sight, U.S. officials were looking ahead to where they might shift American aircraft and drones that have played a role there for seven months, right through to the assault on Moammar Gadhafi's convoy. And they were looking toward the formation of a stable Libyan nation, despite worries about the difficulties of forming disparate rebel groups into a unified government. As international leaders tried to sort out the details of the ousted Libyan leader's death, U.S. officials confirmed on Friday that an American Predator drone took part in the air strike that hit Gadhafi's convoy.
NEWS
September 19, 2011
Aw, come on. Fess up. You know you've done it when nobody's looking - stood in front of a mirror and conducted your favorite Mahler or, at least, played air guitar. In 2007, Xavier Le Roy turned his "conducting" of a recording of Le Sacre du Printemps into a marvelous dance performance. He's taken this concept to another level with More Mouvements , not so much choreographing on the musicians in the piece, but allowing the music (or the score) to impel the movement, which looks more like pantomime than dance, especially when the instruments have gone missing and/or are hidden with musical doubles playing them behind screens.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Ryan Lucas, Associated Press
RAS LANOUF, Libya - Moammar Gadhafi's forces hammered rebels with tanks and rockets, turning their rapid advance into a panicked retreat in an hours-long battle Tuesday. The fighting underscored the dilemma facing the United States and its allies in Libya: Rebels may be unable to oust Gadhafi militarily unless already contentious air strikes go even further in taking out his forces. Opposition fighters pleaded for strikes as they fled the hamlet of Bin Jawwad, where artillery shells crashed thunderously.
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the Afghan war effort, has renewed orders to American troops to refrain from calling in artillery or air power when battling Taliban forces unless they are certain that no civilians are present. Petraeus' order, the first since he assumed command last month from ousted Gen. Stanley McChrystal, was an effort to fine-tune a McChrystal directive that had angered some U.S. troops, who said the restrictions on the use of artillery and air power exposed them to greater danger.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Gov. Ridge, who fought in Vietnam as an infantryman, criticized NATO and the Clinton administration for not using ground troops in Kosovo. In response to questions during an interview Tuesday, Ridge said there was "no possible, conceivable way" to stop the Serbs' ethnic cleansing with air power alone. "I think we've backed into something pretty horrible. And we've made the situation worse rather than better," said the governor, who served as an infantry staff sergeant in Vietnam from November 1969 to May 1970.
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