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NEWS
May 22, 1988 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
So, you're boarding an aircraft, and you want to know its age. If you are flying on an aircraft made by McDonnell Douglas Corp., a plate in the jamb of the left forward door should carry the model type, the serial number and the date the plane was built. If the aircraft was made by Douglas' only U.S. competition, Boeing Co., you'll have to be more resourceful. The manufacturer's plate on a Boeing plane, also in the jamb of the left forward door, does not include the date the plane was built.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Two Roman Catholic priests and two others associated with the peace movement were indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia on charges of damaging four military aircraft last month at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station. The four were arrested on the Montgomery County base Jan. 6 after allegedly striking the aircraft with pointed hammers, causing an estimated $350,000 damage, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael R. Lazerwitz. The two priests, the Rev. Dexter A. Lanctot, 37, of St. Francis of Assisi Church, Norristown, and the Rev. Thomas A. McGann, 36, of Resurrection of Our Lord Church, Chester, have been suspended by Cardinal John Krol as a result of their arrests.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
The Navy yesterday awarded a $1.7 billion, seven-year contract to Boeing Vertol Co. of Ridley Township and Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, to build the first operational tilt-rotor aircraft. Only experimental versions of the aircraft have been flown before. Boeing Vertol and Bell had been working since April 1983 under a Navy contract to design the aircraft, which will be known as the V-22, or Osprey. The aircraft will be able to take off like a helicopter but fly forward at the speed of a turboprop airplane.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
An ultralight aircraft with one person on board crashed at Smoketown Airport in Lancaster County about 5:45 p.m. Saturday, Federal Aviation Administration officials said. The county coroner's office identified the dead man as 30-year-old Michael Blank, but information on his hometown was not available. The Lancaster Intelligencer Journal reported Saturday night that the crash occurred shortly after takeoff. The cause of the crash was as yet unknown, pending an investigation at the scene.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AIMING TO crack down on losers who point lasers at aircraft, the FBI announced yesterday they'll give rewards of up to $10,000 for tips leading to the arrest of illegal laser pointers. Such incidents have skyrocketed 1,100 percent since 2005, when the FBI and Federal Aviation Administration began tracking the deliberate targeting of aircraft by people with handheld lasers. In 2013, 3,960 laser strikes were reported, averaging almost 11 incidents a day, according to the FBI. The FBI's regional reward program will run for 60 days in 12 FBI field offices, including Philadelphia's.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Legislation has been proposed that would bar state officials from using state-owned or state-leased cars or aircraft for political or personal trips and would require officials to account for their use of state cars and aircraft. The measure is sponsored by Assemblyman Joseph Bocchini, a Democrat from Mercer County. With Republicans in control of the General Assembly, the measure, introduced last week, faces an uncertain future. Bocchini said yesterday that he decided to sponsor the legislation after reading news accounts of Gov. Kean's use of state helicopters.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a nickel-size hole was found in the exterior fuselage of a U.S. Airways plane that safely landed in Charlotte from Philadelphia on Monday afternoon, US Airways Group Inc., called the FBI to investigate what may be a bullet hole in the Boeing 737-400. "Given the size and appearance, we decided to involve the authorities," said US Airways spokeswoman Michelle Mohr in Charlotte. According to Fox29, quoting an unidentified source, the FBI in Charlotte has recovered a bullet from the aircraft.
NEWS
July 22, 1986 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Three years after a fire aboard an Air Canada plane killed 23 people, the Federal Aviation Administration adopted stronger regulations yesterday for fire-resistant materials in the passenger cabins of commercial aircraft. Starting Aug. 20, all new designs for aircraft with 20 or more seats will have to include slower-burning and more fire-resistant materials than are now in use in cabin walls, ceilings, partitions, overhead compartments, galleys and other interior sections. Existing planes and new planes built under old designs will have to meet the new cabin standards by 1990.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By JOSH FERNANDEZ, fernanj@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Drivers need to keep their eyes on the road over Memorial Day weekend and remember that eyes in the sky are watching them. State Police officials, joined by PennDOT and local police agencies, said at a news conference yesterday that they'll be clocking the speed of drivers in and around the city from an aircraft throughout the week. Trooper Danea Durham, a State Police spokeswoman, explained that a patrol officer in the passenger seat of the aircraft clocks drivers' speeds and radios to troopers on the ground the description and license number of vehicles caught driving over the speed limit.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
James G. Groff, 78, of Gloucester City, who retired in 2000 as a captain with the Gloucester City Fire Department, died of complications from dementia Friday, Sept. 9, at Alaris Health at Cherry Hill. Because his middle name was Granville, he became known as Grant, his brother Guy said. A 1955 graduate of Gloucester City High School, Mr. Groff was a Navy aircraft maintenance man, from January 1956 to December 1959. For a time, he was assigned to the USS Ticonderoga, stationed in Japan.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Ira M. Saligman, 53, of Wayne, an aviator, philanthropist, and real estate investor, died Sunday, July 31, of injuries he had sustained six days earlier when his vintage aircraft caught fire as it landed in West Mifflin, Pa. Mr. Saligman got out of the airplane at Allegheny County Airport, but died in the Mercy burn unit at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The cause of the fire in the World War II-era plane, as it pulled to a stop on the tarmac, was unknown. Mr. Saligman was en route to an air show in Oshkosh, Wis., where he intended to meet his pilot friends.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The American Airlines copilot accused of being intoxicated before a scheduled flight to Philadelphia from Detroit on Saturday is from Chadds Ford, the Wayne County, Mich., Prosecutor's Office said Tuesday. John Francis Maguire, 50, has been charged with a misdemeanor crime of operating an aircraft under the influence. Maguire, who was released after being charged Saturday, will be arraigned next week, said Maria Miller, a spokeswoman for Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy. At 6:28 a.m. Saturday, Transportation Security Administration screeners observed that Maguire, while going through crew security screening, "appeared to be under the influence of alcohol," said a report of the Wayne Metro Airport Police Department.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
In time for the holidays, when hundreds of thousands of drones will be received as gifts, the Federal Aviation Administration said Monday that recreational pilots and hobbyists must register drones almost as small as a half-pound. By Feb. 19, 2016, drones weighing between 0.55 pounds and 55 pounds, including attached cameras, will have to be registered. Anyone flying a drone or unmanned aircraft for recreational purposes after that date will face a civil penalty of up to $27,500 and potential criminal charges, including a fine of up to $250,000 and three years in prison, the agency said.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. Raymond Hellings, 87, of Cinnaminson, a former aircraft quality control manager, died of complications from heart problems Friday, Oct. 9, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Hellings retired at age 65 after a career of more than a decade at the Boeing Co. plant in Ridley Township, his daughter, Beth Albasi, said. He was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the Cinnaminson Township school board in the 1980s. He moved to the township in 1978, she said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Hellings grew up in the Tacony section, graduated in 1946 from Northeast High School, and studied electrical engineering in night classes at Temple University.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU RARELY SAW Howard Wells without a camera around his neck. What started as a hobby eventually became a passion and ultimately a source of income. You weren't safe from the prying lens of Howard's camera. Nor would you want to be. His photographs captured the daily doings of his native city and its denizens. He also worked for a time for African-American newspapers the Philadelphia Tribune and the Afro-American, recording the events of the day, especially those of interest to African-Americans.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Federal Aviation Administration report details 765 sightings of unmanned small aircraft, commonly called drones, in the nation's airspace - a surge in encounters with remotely piloted mini-planes. It contains a new list of pilot, air traffic, and citizen reports of possible unmanned aircraft sightings covering Nov. 13, 2014, through Aug. 20, 2015. "Because pilot reports of unmanned aircraft have increased dramatically over the past year," the agency said, "the FAA wants to send a clear message that operating drones around airplanes and helicopters is dangerous and illegal.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the camera attached to its underbelly snapped pictures, the drone glided a few hundred feet above the quiet, tree-lined suburban streets of North Coventry Township. It was tracing the path of a killer, investigators say. Chester County prosecutors are hoping the images captured by the unmanned device, driven by four propellers and weighing less than a half-gallon of milk, will help prove that a man arrested last month carefully planned his fatal attack on a rival who was involved with his ex-girlfriend.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sikorsky Aircraft said Tuesday that it will lay off 160 full-time employees and 560 contractors at its facility in Coatesville because low oil prices have cut demand for its helicopters from oil and gas exploration companies. The Coatesville facility is headquarters for the commercial division. About 80 percent of its products go to oil and gas companies or firms in related industries. "Sustained decreases in oil prices continue to drive significant declines in capital investments by oil companies in offshore oil exploration projects impacting Sikorsky and resulting in reduced production levels," Sikorsky spokesman Paul Jackson said in a statement.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventy years after the end of World War II, military aircraft from the era live on to connect people with the nation's - and in many cases, their family's - history. The Commemorative Air Force, devoted to U.S. military aviation history, has brought four planes to the Northeast Philadelphia Airport for a five-day AirPower History Tour, on display through Sunday. Visitors may enter the aircraft where they are parked or take 30-minute flights, though those can cost more than $1,000.
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