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Aircraft Carrier

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NEWS
July 26, 1998 | By David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from the Associated Press
President Clinton commissioned the Navy's newest nuclear-powered aircraft carrier yesterday, the 97,000-ton USS Harry S. Truman, named after the nation's 33d president. Recalling President Truman's relentless optimism, Clinton told the crowd of a letter that young Harry wrote to his future wife, Bess, in 1913 after some business failures. "My ship is going to come in yet. " "We all know that Harry Truman was a man of his word," President Clinton said. "It took 85 years, but here on July 25, 1998, Harry Truman's ship has come in. " Besides the President, the first commander-in-chief in 23 years to commission a new carrier, the event drew a host of military and political leaders, including a sizable contingent of Missourians.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Chris Brummitt, Associated Press
ON BOARD THE USS GEORGE WASHINGTON - A U.S. aircraft carrier group cruised through the disputed South China Sea on Saturday in a show of American power in waters that are fast becoming a focal point of Washington's strategic rivalry with Beijing. Vietnamese security and government officials were flown onto the nuclear-powered USS George Washington ship, underlining the burgeoning military relationship between the former enemies. A small number of journalists were also invited to witness the display of maritime might in the oil-rich waters, which are home to islands disputed between China and the other smaller Asian nations facing the sea. The visit will likely reassure Vietnam and the Philippines of U.S. but could annoy China, whose growing economic and naval strength is leading to a greater assertiveness in pressing its claims there.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | By Charlie Frush, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony S. Miller Jr. soon will be taking his nine-foot aircraft carrier out for a shakedown cruise on the cranberry bog behind his home in Indian Mills. The USS Dwight D. Eisenhower doesn't pull much of a draft. Maybe a few inches, but it looks pretty seaworthy. Miller's naval task force now will consist two ships. They represent the two biggest classes of ships in the U.S. Navy. The other is his six-foot-long battleship, the USS New Jersey, now in drydock in a case in his living room.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2008 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy, overhauled here in the mid-1990s as the final task of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, is returning to the city for long-term storage. Generally, the public is not allowed aboard vessels at the inactive-fleet facility, part of the former Navy Base on the Delaware River. With its 4.6-acre flight deck, the Kennedy would be a visible landmark for planes landing at Philadelphia International Airport and boaters on the river. Lt. Clay Doss, a Navy spokesman, would confirm only that the Kennedy, also known as CV67, would be towed here for "safe storage" pending a decision on its future.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Kuwaiti tankers and U.S. warships carefully navigate the Persian Gulf, the main element in their defense - the aircraft carrier Constellation - will be silently guarding the gulf from a station hundreds of miles to the south, in the Arabian Sea. The gulf - the international centerpiece of the Iran-Iraq war - will become the focal point for a few highly trained American sailors, who, sitting in the Constellation's air-conditioned combat center,...
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. - The world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was retired from active service on Saturday, temporarily reducing the number of carriers in the U.S. fleet to 10 until 2015. The USS Enterprise ended its notable 51-year career during a ceremony at its home port at Naval Station Norfolk, where thousands of former crew members, ship builders and their families lined a pier to bid farewell to one of the most decorated ships in the Navy. "It'll be a special memory.
SPORTS
March 9, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
The widow of boxer Beetha-vean Scottland is suing New York City officials, contending they allowed her husband to be beaten to death during a fight aboard an aircraft carrier in the Hudson River. Denise Scottland says in her lawsuit the officials permitted the fighter to be "unreasonably and violently pummeled" during the bout on June 26, 2001. The 26-year-old light heavyweight from North Brentwood, Md., was knocked out by undefeated George Khalid Jones in the last 37 seconds of a nationally televised 10-round fight aboard the Intrepid, a floating air-sea museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
On Sept. 27, 1983, Washington Post defense correspondent George C. Wilson boarded the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy at the Norfolk, Va., naval base. The ship would not return home until May 2, 1984. The adventures that ensued - Wilson also got to fly - are reported in the nonfiction nail-biter Supercarrier (Berkley, $3.95). Here is Wilson on the book's raison d'etre: "Ever since World War II the United States has been without enough land bases overseas to project its military power.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Rusty Miller, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - As Jim Foster grows older, his thoughts often flood back to those he has known who have passed on. Maybe that's expected for a 64-year-old who spent three years in the Army, including 18 months in Vietnam, before a lifetime as a teacher and coach. "As you age, you start to think a little bit more relative to guys who you went to school with and served with that died in the service," he said softly. That his Ohio State team opens its season Friday on an aircraft carrier, surrounded by servicemen and women, enhances his memories.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Brock Vergakis, Associated Press
ABOARD THE USS ENTERPRISE - The world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier ended its remarkable career at sea on Sunday when it pulled into its home port for the final time after participating in every major conflict since the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. The USS Enterprise began shutting down its eight nuclear reactors almost as soon as it arrived at its pier at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia, where thousands of cheering family members and friends welcomed the ship home from its 25th and final deployment after nearly eight months at sea. The ship will never move on its own power again and will eventually be scrapped in Washington state.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the middle of a major capital campaign that could reach $900 million, Drexel University recently gave its entrepreneurial president, John A. Fry, a second five-year contract, running to August 2020. The board of trustees unanimously approved the pact Sept. 30, said trustees chairman Richard Greenawalt. Fry received a boost in pay for good performance, Greenawalt said, but declined to provide the amount. Drexel, like most private colleges, does not release pay until it becomes public on tax forms.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Robert Nelson McIntyre, 89, of Doylestown, a pastor in the Reformed Episcopal Church, died Thursday, July 3, of Parkinson's disease at his home. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from Northeast High School in 1942 and attended Philadelphia College of the Bible and Temple University. He graduated from the Reformed Episcopal Theological Seminary in 1956. Mr. McIntyre joined the Navy in 1943 and served in the Pacific. His military discharge papers show that he trained at various naval stations before being assigned to a flight crew.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As commander of the community relations division of the Philadelphia Police Department in the early 1980s, E. Robert Korn enjoyed not only dealing with law-abiding citizens, but also at times being a face of the city, his son Warren said. "He got to travel on behalf of the city as a representative of the Police Department," his son said. One of Mr. Korn's favorite memories was briefing crew members of the aircraft carrier Saratoga at its port near Jacksonville, Fla., in the early 1980s, before joining them on the voyage to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the Saratoga's extensive repairs.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was like living aboard a floating city. There was recreation. Allen Polixa, a crew member on the USS Forrestal from 1980 to 1982, often took "swim breaks" miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, jumping into the water from just below the ship's top deck. There was order. Fight a colleague or steal from another crew member, said Jimmie Stewart, who served on the Forrestal from 1960 to 1962, and it was down to the brig. No questions asked. And there was chaos. In July 1967, a devastating fire and a series of chain-reaction explosions took the lives of 134 sailors aboard the Forrestal.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
Army suspect backs Taliban FORT HOOD, Texas - The Army psychiatrist charged in the mass shooting at Fort Hood asked pointed questions about religion and used several opportunities Wednesday to declare his support for the Taliban and a fellow American-born Muslim who killed a U.S. soldier, as he was allowed to zero in on potential jurors during the second day of jury selection. Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is serving as his own attorney in his military murder trial, participated as nine of the remaining 14 Army officers in the group were questioned.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Brock Vergakis, Associated Press
ABOARD THE USS GEORGE H.W. BUSH - The Navy for the first time Tuesday launched an unmanned aircraft the size of a fighter jet from a warship in the Atlantic Ocean, as it wades deeper into America's drone program amid growing concerns over the legality of its escalating surveillance and lethal strikes. The drone, called the X-47B, is considered particularly valuable because it is the first designed specifically to take off and land on an aircraft carrier, allowing it to be used around the world without needing the permission of other countries to serve as a home base.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States is at risk of becoming a second-rate power if automatic budget cuts go into effect, plunging the armed forces into the most significant readiness crisis they have faced in more than a decade, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta warned Thursday. Panetta, who is retiring soon from his post, told the Senate Armed Services Committee that if the reductions are allowed to stand he would have to throw the country's national defense strategy "out the window. " But he also assured lawmakers the Pentagon would take the steps necessary to deal with possible threats in the Persian Gulf region after he approved the Navy's request to halve its aircraft carrier presence in the area.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. - The world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was retired from active service on Saturday, temporarily reducing the number of carriers in the U.S. fleet to 10 until 2015. The USS Enterprise ended its notable 51-year career during a ceremony at its home port at Naval Station Norfolk, where thousands of former crew members, ship builders and their families lined a pier to bid farewell to one of the most decorated ships in the Navy. "It'll be a special memory.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Rusty Miller, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - As Jim Foster grows older, his thoughts often flood back to those he has known who have passed on. Maybe that's expected for a 64-year-old who spent three years in the Army, including 18 months in Vietnam, before a lifetime as a teacher and coach. "As you age, you start to think a little bit more relative to guys who you went to school with and served with that died in the service," he said softly. That his Ohio State team opens its season Friday on an aircraft carrier, surrounded by servicemen and women, enhances his memories.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Brock Vergakis, Associated Press
ABOARD THE USS ENTERPRISE - The world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier ended its remarkable career at sea on Sunday when it pulled into its home port for the final time after participating in every major conflict since the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. The USS Enterprise began shutting down its eight nuclear reactors almost as soon as it arrived at its pier at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia, where thousands of cheering family members and friends welcomed the ship home from its 25th and final deployment after nearly eight months at sea. The ship will never move on its own power again and will eventually be scrapped in Washington state.
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