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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Barbara Surk, Associated Press
BEIRUT - The battle for Syria's second-largest airport intensified Saturday as government troops tried to reverse recent strategic gains the rebels have made in the northeast in their quest to topple President Bashar al-Assad. Assad's forces have been locked in a stalemate with rebels in Aleppo since July when the city, the largest in Syria, became a major battlefield in the two-year-old conflict the United Nations says has killed at least 70,000 people. For months, rebels have been trying to capture the international airport, which is closed because of the fighting.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1995 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Next time you're at Philly International, give a closer listen to the airport public-address system. You may hear some familiar voices. Beginning Thursday night, Boyz II Men crooning "On Bended Knee"; the Patti LaBelle-Michael McDonald duet "On My Own"; Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes' toe-tapper "Wake Up Everybody"; and Sister Sledge's anthem "We Are Family" will be among the 15 homegrown acts and composers whose tunes will sound through the...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You know who you are, but how do you prove it if you have no documentation? Lost in Transit puts Arturo Conti, a respectable, middle-aged Frenchman, into that Kafkaesque predicament when he flies from Montreal to Paris. In Montreal, someone lifted his carry-on baggage containing his passport and his billfold with all his credit cards, driver's license and money, and even stole his shoes. In Paris, immigration officials refuse to let him leave the airport. What is he supposed to do? Stay there, until he can prove he is who he says he is. So Conti, played by Jean Rochefort (The Tall Blonde Man with One Black Shoe)
NEWS
March 10, 2003
DAILY NEWS reporter Don Russell scoffed at the airport's use of Hummers. He obviously has not seen our remote topography where 75 deer were living on wooded, uneven terrain a few years ago. We chase geese and deer away from our runways because an animal ingested into a jet engine can cause millions of dollars in damage and untold human casualties. Hummers help our employees monitor 12 miles of fence line, portions of which are otherwise inaccessible. These inspections were prioritized by the events of 9/11.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Not again. For the second time in two months, Mayor Street's tenure in office has been marked by a nasty, public, high-level firing. City Aviation Director Alfred Testa was dumped from his $150,000-a-year post yesterday, escorted from his airport office by police and city lawyers after he refused to resign. By one account, Testa felt compelled to tell the small crowd of onlookers gathered in the corridor that he wasn't being arrested. Just fired. In contrast to the explosive jettisoning of Communications Director Ken Snyder in January, the administration tried to handle this departure quietly.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
One of the giddy perks of getting elected, Mayor Street joked when he first took office, was that everyone waits for the mayor - even planes about to take off. The same must go for planes that have just landed, even when the plane is Air Force One and the passenger is the president of the United States. With Street running late due to navigational difficulties yesterday, President Clinton had to wait about 15 minutes before he could make his ceremonial, wave-to-the-cameras descent and shake hands with the mayor at the bottom of the stairs.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
The group exhibited no exceptional signs of nervousness as it walked through the airport toward the Eastern Airlines jetliner. No sweaty palms or rapid pulse rates. No thoughts of escaping through the nearest door. A quick check of its SUDS level, short for Subjective Units of Discomfort, confirmed that the fearful flyers class from Temple University's Agoraphobia and Anxiety Program was handling the trip to the airport surprisingly well. Then they boarded the plane, and their SUDS level shot up like a 727 on takeoff.
NEWS
April 23, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
ST. LOUIS - Lambert Field in St. Louis has been closed after an apparent tornado tore through the airport last night, lifting a roof off the terminal and injuring several people. Broadcast reports, citing airport officials, said most of the injuries last night were believed to be minor. Airport officials say the airport was shut down and planes were diverted to other locations. Crews were assessing damage at all the terminals. Plate glass windows were torn out, largely in Concourse C, where the most of the damage appeared to occur.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Patrick Quinn and Rahim Faiez
ASSOCIATED PRESS KABUL, Afghanistan - At least five heavily armed insurgents were engaged in an hours-long gun battle with security forces on the perimeter of Afghanistan's main airport Monday after they tried to attack NATO's airport headquarters with rocket-propelled grenades, assault rifles, and at least one large bomb, the army and police said. The airport was closed to civilian air traffic because of the attack, an airport official said. It was unclear whether the attack had damaged facilities inside the airport itself.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | by Joseph R. Daughen Daily News Staff Writer
Councilman Jim Kenney wants to know if Rosenbluth International, the Philadelphia-based travel giant, was squeezed out of an airport contract it held for four years because it failed to donate money to Mayor Street's campaign. "The airport is a regional asset that contributes $6 billion to the area's economy and is not someone's personal domain to reward campaign contributors," said Kenney. "To take a company like Rosenbluth, which has been here since 1892 and has 1,200 employees, and boot it out because it didn't contribute or contributed to the wrong candidate is not a good sign to the business community.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Mayor Kenney wants 37 merchants at the city-owned Philadelphia International Airport to raise the pay of 1,200 full- and part-time workers to $12 an hour, in keeping with a "living wage" standard approved by Philadelphia voters in May 2014. The merchants had signed leases with the airport in 2014 or earlier, before the wage ordinance was in effect. The mayor said in a statement that 20 other airport merchants already pay their workers $12 or more an hour, including 489 unionized employees with collective bargaining agreements.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
German maintenance-technology firm Pruftechnik Inc. has selected Philadelphia for its U.S. headquarters, a move that will create 35 new specialized full-time jobs, according to Gov. Wolf's office. The company, which supplies high-end testing and measuring systems for industrial maintenance, will lease 9,000 square feet of warehouse and distribution-center space at 7821 Bartram Ave. near Philadelphia International Airport, state Department of Community & Economic Development spokeswoman Lyndsay Kensinger said said in a email Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Food delivered to your gate at the touch of a screen is coming to Philadelphia International Airport. More than 1,000 Apple iPads will be installed at Terminal B in a collaboration among American Airlines, the airport, concessions-and-retail manager MarketPlace PHL, and the New York-based food and beverage provider OTG Management. With iPads at seats in 15 gate areas and eight new restaurants, passengers will be able to get flight updates, browse the web, play games, and order food and drinks and have them delivered right to them.
REAL_ESTATE
May 9, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. You hear it at least several times an hour on the radio: an announcer giving the current temperature at Philadelphia International Airport. You probably ask yourself: Who cares? No one lives at the airport, right? Wrong. Well, sort of wrong. PHL may have no human full-time residents, but its international terminal, the western end of the airfield, and runways 9L/27R and 9R/27L are in Tinicum Township, Delaware County.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A PERFECT storm is brewing at U.S. airports ahead of the busy summer travel season: longer lines to get through security screening. Airlines and airports are warning fliers to get to the airport two hours early for domestic flights and three hours for international trips. Traffic is up, TSA staffing is down, and the security workers who remain are charged with carrying out more stringent measures after recent terror attacks. Passengers on American Airlines in Philadelphia and in four other cities got a taste of the longer waits over spring break, March 14 to March 20, when lines through screening checkpoints were an hour or longer.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The calling card of Atlantic City International Airport long has been convenience. Compared with larger airports in the greater metropolitan area - including Philadelphia International and Newark Liberty International - passengers at ACY could expect easy travel to and from the airport, relatively inexpensive parking, and fairly quick security screenings. But cutbacks that began in March in Transportation Security Administration personnel at the facility have limited the hours that security checkpoints are manned - now until only 8 p.m. daily.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A new Federal Aviation Administration report details 583 drone sightings in the nation's airspace, a dramatic increase, the agency said. Ten of the nearly 600 incidents were in airspace around Philadelphia International Airport. None of these was described as a "near miss. " Nationwide, the sightings came from pilots, citizens, and, air traffic controllers from Aug. 21, 2015, to Jan. 31, 2016. Each month, the FAA receives more than 100 reports of remotely piloted drones in the skies, many in restricted space around airports.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
A version of this story ran in some editions Monday. WHILE PHILADELPHIA condemns a hero to a lonely corner of our airport, the Florida Aviation Historical Society next month will induct Mary Frances Housley into its Hall of Fame. She was the flight attendant, known as Frankie, who surrendered her life on Jan. 14, 1951, in the only fatal crash at Philadelphia International Airport. She was 24. On a flight from Newark to Norfolk, National Airlines Flight 83, with 28 aboard, made a scheduled stop in Philly early on a Sunday afternoon.
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