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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Barbara Surk, Associated Press
BEIRUT - The battle for Syria's second-largest airport intensified Saturday as government troops tried to reverse recent strategic gains the rebels have made in the northeast in their quest to topple President Bashar al-Assad. Assad's forces have been locked in a stalemate with rebels in Aleppo since July when the city, the largest in Syria, became a major battlefield in the two-year-old conflict the United Nations says has killed at least 70,000 people. For months, rebels have been trying to capture the international airport, which is closed because of the fighting.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1995 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Next time you're at Philly International, give a closer listen to the airport public-address system. You may hear some familiar voices. Beginning Thursday night, Boyz II Men crooning "On Bended Knee"; the Patti LaBelle-Michael McDonald duet "On My Own"; Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes' toe-tapper "Wake Up Everybody"; and Sister Sledge's anthem "We Are Family" will be among the 15 homegrown acts and composers whose tunes will sound through the...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You know who you are, but how do you prove it if you have no documentation? Lost in Transit puts Arturo Conti, a respectable, middle-aged Frenchman, into that Kafkaesque predicament when he flies from Montreal to Paris. In Montreal, someone lifted his carry-on baggage containing his passport and his billfold with all his credit cards, driver's license and money, and even stole his shoes. In Paris, immigration officials refuse to let him leave the airport. What is he supposed to do? Stay there, until he can prove he is who he says he is. So Conti, played by Jean Rochefort (The Tall Blonde Man with One Black Shoe)
NEWS
March 10, 2003
DAILY NEWS reporter Don Russell scoffed at the airport's use of Hummers. He obviously has not seen our remote topography where 75 deer were living on wooded, uneven terrain a few years ago. We chase geese and deer away from our runways because an animal ingested into a jet engine can cause millions of dollars in damage and untold human casualties. Hummers help our employees monitor 12 miles of fence line, portions of which are otherwise inaccessible. These inspections were prioritized by the events of 9/11.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Not again. For the second time in two months, Mayor Street's tenure in office has been marked by a nasty, public, high-level firing. City Aviation Director Alfred Testa was dumped from his $150,000-a-year post yesterday, escorted from his airport office by police and city lawyers after he refused to resign. By one account, Testa felt compelled to tell the small crowd of onlookers gathered in the corridor that he wasn't being arrested. Just fired. In contrast to the explosive jettisoning of Communications Director Ken Snyder in January, the administration tried to handle this departure quietly.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
One of the giddy perks of getting elected, Mayor Street joked when he first took office, was that everyone waits for the mayor - even planes about to take off. The same must go for planes that have just landed, even when the plane is Air Force One and the passenger is the president of the United States. With Street running late due to navigational difficulties yesterday, President Clinton had to wait about 15 minutes before he could make his ceremonial, wave-to-the-cameras descent and shake hands with the mayor at the bottom of the stairs.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
The group exhibited no exceptional signs of nervousness as it walked through the airport toward the Eastern Airlines jetliner. No sweaty palms or rapid pulse rates. No thoughts of escaping through the nearest door. A quick check of its SUDS level, short for Subjective Units of Discomfort, confirmed that the fearful flyers class from Temple University's Agoraphobia and Anxiety Program was handling the trip to the airport surprisingly well. Then they boarded the plane, and their SUDS level shot up like a 727 on takeoff.
NEWS
April 23, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
ST. LOUIS - Lambert Field in St. Louis has been closed after an apparent tornado tore through the airport last night, lifting a roof off the terminal and injuring several people. Broadcast reports, citing airport officials, said most of the injuries last night were believed to be minor. Airport officials say the airport was shut down and planes were diverted to other locations. Crews were assessing damage at all the terminals. Plate glass windows were torn out, largely in Concourse C, where the most of the damage appeared to occur.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Patrick Quinn and Rahim Faiez
ASSOCIATED PRESS KABUL, Afghanistan - At least five heavily armed insurgents were engaged in an hours-long gun battle with security forces on the perimeter of Afghanistan's main airport Monday after they tried to attack NATO's airport headquarters with rocket-propelled grenades, assault rifles, and at least one large bomb, the army and police said. The airport was closed to civilian air traffic because of the attack, an airport official said. It was unclear whether the attack had damaged facilities inside the airport itself.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | by Joseph R. Daughen Daily News Staff Writer
Councilman Jim Kenney wants to know if Rosenbluth International, the Philadelphia-based travel giant, was squeezed out of an airport contract it held for four years because it failed to donate money to Mayor Street's campaign. "The airport is a regional asset that contributes $6 billion to the area's economy and is not someone's personal domain to reward campaign contributors," said Kenney. "To take a company like Rosenbluth, which has been here since 1892 and has 1,200 employees, and boot it out because it didn't contribute or contributed to the wrong candidate is not a good sign to the business community.
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BUSINESS
May 13, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia International Airport plans a 2015 job fair Tuesday at Temple University to fill more than 600 openings at the airport. More than 30 businesses, including airlines, restaurants, car-rental companies, retailers, and government agencies, will interview candidates for jobs that include customer-service representative, sales associate, bartender, server, bookkeeper, massage therapist, cosmetologist, manager, cashier, and others. The airport's fair will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Liacouras Center, 1776 N. Broad St. Applicants can meet with employment specialists to have their resum├ęs reviewed and attend workplace-etiquette workshops for interview tips.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day pilots Richard Poch and Joseph Deal were killed when their small plane plunged to the ground near West Chester, an airplane of the same model also crashed, killing its pilot, just 200 miles south, in Orange, Va. By numbers alone, the crashes - just two of six accidents involving small planes in the United States that March 29 - could have been enough to spook casual observers. But they didn't rattle local airport officials. "That's like saying two Nissan Sentras crashed yesterday," said Jeff Suveg, assistant manager of Brandywine Airport in West Chester, from which Deal and Poch departed.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In response to requests from traveling mothers, Philadelphia International Airport and Minute Suites, a micro-hotel inside security and near the airline gates, are making private rooms available to mothers to breast-feed or pump breast milk between flights. Minute Suites opened at the airport in spring 2011 between Terminal A and Concourse B, with 13 private rooms for passengers to nap, relax, or work. The rooms, seven feet by eight feet, will be free to nursing mothers for the first 30 minutes, and cost $14 for an additional half-hour.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A NEWARK, N.J.-BOUND flight made an emergency landing in Philly yesterday after one of its engines became engulfed in flames, officials said. United Airlines Express Flight 4882, out of Raleigh, N.C., touched down at Philadelphia International Airport about 4:15 p.m., said Mary Flannery, an airport spokeswoman. None of the 75 people on board was injured in the landing, Flannery said. One male passenger was taken to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center from the Tarmac after complaining of chest pains.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of Philadelphia, Delaware County, and that county's Tinicum Township signed a multimillion-dollar financial settlement Wednesday to end long-simmering tensions between the city-owned Philadelphia International Airport and its municipal neighbors over a massive plan to expand the airport. Terms of the agreement, announced in May 2014 and finalized with Wednesday's signing, includes funding to protect tax revenues for Delaware County, Tinicum Township, and the Interboro School District.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade ago, city health inspectors would see occasional mouse droppings at Philadelphia International Airport, black residue and slime inside ice machines, and eggs and other cold foods kept at temperatures too warm. In 2011, the airport approved the hiring of two former city health inspectors, and the results have been dramatic. Violations for risk factors known to cause food-borne illness have significantly declined. Today, the airport's 27 eat-in restaurants have a better average than the citywide numbers for 5,000 non-airport eat-in restaurants.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FIVE TO SIX hundred airport baggage handlers, airplane cleaners and wheelchair attendants skipped work yesterday to protest that many are still earning minimum wage or close to it despite passage of a city law last year that called for them to have gotten raises. The nonunion employees started the day protesting where they work, Philadelphia International Airport, then moved on to City Hall, where they rallied in solidarity with City Council members Kenyatta Johnson, Ed Neilson, Blondell Reynolds Brown, Maria Quinones-Sanchez and Curtis Jones.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Kristen A. Graham, and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two people were killed Sunday afternoon when a small airplane crashed in a field near the Brandywine Airport in Chester County. Authorities said the plane, a Piper PA28 Cherokee, crashed about 1:34 p.m. in West Goshen Township, less than two miles from the airport. Emergency crews at the crash site said the plane was in flames. The victims, both men, were not identified. The fixed-wing, single-engine plane had just taken off from the airport and crossed over Route 202 before crashing near the 1000 block of Saunders Lane, police said.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airlines nickel and dime passengers to check a bag, for seats with extra legroom, and to change a ticket. Spirit and Frontier charge to put a carry-on in the overhead bin. Now, airports want to increase the passenger "facility fee" added to every airline ticket - from $4.50 to $8.50, to pay for construction projects and infrastructure needs. That would be $8.50 each way - when you get on a plane to leave for a trip, and when you board the flight home. In Philadelphia, the usage fee generates about $61 million annually, and has helped pay debt on bonds to build the international Terminal A West, Terminal F, and the expansion to Terminals D and E, as well as airfield and other improvements, said Philadelphia International Airport CEO Mark Gale.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
So, where does your checked bag go after you drop it at the airline ticket counter? Like many passengers, bags may have a quarter-mile journey from the ticketing lobby to the aircraft. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Wednesday offered a rare glimpse behind the scenes at how baggage is screened at Philadelphia International Airport, where an in-line system of conveyor belts and explosive-detection machines can process up to 1,000 bags an hour. "Some people think the TSA opens and physically screens every single bag," said TSA spokesman Michael McCarthy.
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