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SPORTS
October 5, 2008 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who once was a maverick you could root for has become a buffoon that nobody can work for. Known for his catchy slogans like, "Just Win Baby" and "Commitment to Excellence," Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis was the NFL's biggest rebel, a force to be reckoned with because of how good his teams were on the field and how fierce his bite was off it. With his slicked-back, jet-black hair, Davis looked like he should be hanging out with Classy...
SPORTS
December 2, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In the latest legal battle with maverick Al Davis, fellow NFL owners closed ranks around commissioner Paul Tagliabue by voting unanimously yesterday not to investigate charges that he raided millions of dollars from the league. Davis, owner of the Oakland Raiders, said the decision was expected and vowed to return to court with his claims against Tagliabue and outgoing NFL president Neil Austrian. "I'm not disappointed," Davis said after the five-hour meeting at a downtown Atlanta hotel.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
To borrow a term from TV news jargon, the National Football League strike produced so much "bang-bang" yesterday that the latest smart maneuver by Al Davis went almost unnoticed. Davis is the majority owner of the Los Angeles Raiders, a team that used to be known as the Oakland Raiders, but that ultimately will be known as the Irwindale Raiders, whenever the latter community's new $115 million "state- of-the-art" stadium is completed. Even though Irwindale has already sweetened the deal by giving Davis a non- refundable $10 million bond up front, other NFL club owners are saying Commissioner Pete Rozelle will never permit the Raiders to relocate in that small industrial town 25 miles outside of L.A. Of course, these same owners were equally confident that Rozelle would never allow Davis to move the Raiders out of Oakland, and we all know how that battle of wits turned out. Davis has been described as the Frank Sinatra of pro sports, because he thumbs his nose at convention and does it his way. Naturally, this does not endear Davis to the old-boy clique among NFL owners, whose franchises have overcome their own mismanagement and grown fat on TV royalties.
SPORTS
July 7, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Looking like a middle-aged Elvis Presley and sounding like a capitalist version of Fidel Castro, Al Davis used the Raiders' storied history to explain his team's proposed return to Oakland. Combative at times and effusive at others, Davis used a crowded news conference in Oakland yesterday to attack his perceived enemies, cajole his fans and justify his status as the NFL's resident maverick. He got in swipes at the NFL, which will meet in Chicago next week to discuss the proposed move, and at the San Francisco 49ers, who Davis implied are trying to block his return from Los Angeles to Oakland.
SPORTS
April 10, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis testified yesterday that negotiations for a state-of-the-art stadium collapsed in a matter of days in June 1995 after terms of the deal were suddenly changed. Taking the witness stand for the first time in his $1 billion lawsuit against the NFL, Davis said he grudgingly accepted the notion of a second team playing at the proposed stadium in suburban Inglewood until being informed it could start playing there the same year as the Raiders. "That to me meant the deal was dead," he said under questioning from Raiders attorney Joseph Alioto.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
Al Davis, managing general partner of the NFL's Los Angeles Raiders, yesterday announced his intention to move his franchise back to Oakland by the 1992 season. Davis, who is attending the NFL's owners meeting in Orlando, notified Oakland Mayor Lionel Wilson and Don Perata, head of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, of his decision by telephone. The Raiders played in Oakland from 1960 to 1982, when Davis moved the club to Los Angeles over the NFL's objections. "We've been on the 10-yard line, then on the 5-yard line, now we have to call the play and get in the end zone," said the man who has come to symbolize what many regard as the league's renegade franchise.
SPORTS
June 22, 1995 | By Dave Caldwell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Al Davis might be taking his mangy pompadour, his white Elvis jumpsuit, and his pro football team back to Oakland. Then again, he might not. Word spread quickly yesterday that Davis was ready to announce he will move the Raiders out of Los Angeles - the very city that Davis had successfully sued the NFL to move to in 1982. The Associated Press and two San Francisco-area radio stations reported that Davis was set to announce that he had struck a sweetheart of a deal with the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to play there in 1995, and possibly beyond.
SPORTS
January 10, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Jon Gruden went through a second day of interviews with the Oakland Raiders yesterday, the agent for the Eagles' offensive coordinator predicted a quick decision. "I don't think it's going to be a long, protracted thing," agent Bob LaMonte said. "Jon is very pleased with how it went. He's going to go home [to Philadelphia today]. I don't expect anything to happen imminently, but I think Jon has a good feel about where things are. " Gruden met with Raiders owner Al Davis for six to seven hours yesterday, LaMonte said.
SPORTS
August 30, 1992 | By Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Al Davis, the Los Angeles Raiders owner, has a knack for collecting cash that must make his colleagues - yes, even the Eagles' tight-fisted Norman Braman - green with envy. For the second time in five years, Davis stands to receive $10 million because of an unkept stadium promise. Spectacor Management Group, a company one-third owned by Ed Snider, has pulled out of its deal to renovate the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, citing the recession and its inability to sell luxury boxes to fund the project.
SPORTS
October 3, 2008 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crazy like a Raider Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie may have made a few mistakes over the years - Ray Rhodes, the "gold standard" comment, Doug Pederson - but he's this close to Mr. Perfect these days when compared to Raiders owner Al Davis. OK, we all know the 79-year-old Davis is, well, crazy. But the cranky old man may have put the icing on his own cake this week, and he did it all in one sitting. Here are some excerpts, courtesy of the Associated Press, of Davis' comments during the announcement Tuesday that he had fired coach Lane Kiffin.
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NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Using Jeffrey Lurie's own remarkable logic, Eagles coach Andy Reid has no choice but to bring back Juan Castillo as his defensive coordinator for his make-or-break 2012 season. Seriously. If Reid wasn't fired for giving Castillo a job he was singularly unqualified for - and blowing an entire season as a result - how can he fire Castillo? If there are no consequences for Reid's failure of leadership in 2011, how can there be consequences for Castillo? How many scapegoats does this coach get, anyway?
SPORTS
October 10, 2011 | Associated Press
HOUSTON - Coach Hue Jackson sank to his knees, buried his face in his hands and finally released the emotions he'd been holding back. The Oakland Raiders won the day after their maverick owner, Al Davis, died, beating the Houston Texans, 25-20, on Sunday behind Jason Campbell's two touchdown passes. Michael Huff intercepted Matt Schaub's pass in the end zone on the final play, and the Raiders ran to celebrate a bittersweet victory unlike any other in the storied history of the franchise.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Laurence Arnold, BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE
Al Davis, 82, the renegade owner of the Oakland Raiders whose battles with the National Football League gave him an outlaw image matching that of his silver-and-black-clad team, died Saturday. The Raiders announced his death on their website, without providing any further details. While imploring his players on the field to "Just win, baby," Davis ran some of football's biggest sideshows. He first faced off with the NFL in the 1960s when, as the hard-charging commissioner of the rival American Football League, he escalated a tug-of-war for top players.
SPORTS
August 27, 2011 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
Tandon Doss is a rookie wide receiver for the Baltimore Ravens, was a finalist for Indiana's Mr. Football Award his senior year of high school, and is Batman . Yes, Batman. Before the Ravens' 34-31 win over the Redskins on Thursday, Doss broke up a knife fight at a Five Guys in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Like any good action hero, he deflected praise. "I saw somebody start fighting, and I broke it up," Doss said, according to NFL.com. "That's all it was to me. " The Baltimore Sun said a police spokesman reported that two men attacked a manager at the restaurant at about 4:30 p.m., cutting his chin with a knife.
SPORTS
May 12, 2011 | by Sam Donnellon
On the loyalty of Flyers fans:   "The basic thing is, people realize that it ain't easy to win. There's 30 teams trying. But they give you credit for trying hard and having a competitive team most of the time. For example, we didn't win last year. But it was probably just as exciting as if we had. Considering everything we accomplished last year. So therefore the fans got value for their buck and they feel like they were entertained and they had a great time. We want to win a championship.
SPORTS
January 7, 2010
EVERYONE KNOWS Raiders owner Al Davis is a yard short of a first down. Which makes us wonder why former quarterback Rich Gannon would call his old boss and offer to help get the woeful Raiders back on track. "I did something yesterday that I can't believe even I did," Gannon said on Sirius NFL Radio. "I picked up the phone and I reached out to Al Davis. So I called Mr. Davis, I have not spoken with him yet, but I'm happy to help out in any way I can. I'd love to help [quarterback]
NEWS
February 26, 2009 | By Rita Giordano and Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The man called in to bring order to Camden High is a tough disciplinarian and former pro football player who won't need long to familiarize himself with the school. Al Davis, whose "emergency" appointment was approved by the Camden school board on Tuesday night, most recently worked as the district supervisor of health and physical education. He was suspended as principal of Camden High School three years ago amid charges of grade-changing. District spokesman Bart Leff said the allegations concerning Davis had been dropped after an internal investigation.
SPORTS
October 9, 2008 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raider-go-round An alert Niffle staffer brought this to my attention late yesterday, and I had to address it. Paul Needell of the Newark Star-Ledger suggested on Sunday that former Giants coach Jim Fassel would be a perfect fit as the new Raiders coach. Needell noted correctly that Fassel worked as a QB coach for Al Davis in the '90s and that Fassel, while never one to connect well with modern players, badly wants to return to the NFL. Left unsaid, however, was: Why in the world would Needell wish the Raiders on anybody?
SPORTS
October 5, 2008 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who once was a maverick you could root for has become a buffoon that nobody can work for. Known for his catchy slogans like, "Just Win Baby" and "Commitment to Excellence," Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis was the NFL's biggest rebel, a force to be reckoned with because of how good his teams were on the field and how fierce his bite was off it. With his slicked-back, jet-black hair, Davis looked like he should be hanging out with Classy...
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