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Al Dente

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FOOD
December 10, 1989 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
If we're not careful, al dente is liable to die from misuse. Born of the best intentions, al dente was to be the savior of olive-drab string beans and sodden spinach. In a revolution of crispness and color, it redefined what vegetable cooking was, rescuing the downtrodden side dish from decades of boiling abuse. Al dente - an Italian phrase that describes the fleeting moment in cooking when an ingredient has lost its crispness but is not yet fully soft - literally translates as "to the tooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
1 whole egg 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese or part pecorino and part Parmesan ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon salt 4 ounces spaghetti 2 teaspoons unsalted butter (or use salted butter and less salt) 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces pancetta cut into ¼-inch-thick slices (substitute 4 strips crumbled bacon or 4 tablespoons bacon bits)   1. In a large bowl, whisk together egg, cheese, and pepper. Keep bowl near stove.
FOOD
March 21, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Pasta that boils to al dente in 10 or 12 minutes is always a boon to cooks in a hurry. Pasta that doesn't need to be boiled at all is even more of a busy-day helper. In the recipe that follows, thin spaghetti, called spaghettini, is broken into two-inch lengths and added to stir-fried broccoli rabe with a small amount of chicken broth. The pasta cooks with the broccoli in about 10 to 12 minutes. And no, the result is neither starchy nor mushy. Broccoli rabe is the distinctive, thin-stemmed broccoli beloved by Italian cooks for its interesting, slightly bitter flavor.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fast proliferating, Italian restaurants are all the rage these days; indeed, dozens of new places have been opening the past year or so in seemingly endless splendor. But few can match the quality of the home cooking at the new Riviera Ristorante & Pizza in Sharp's Run Plaza outside Medford. Riviera shares space with a pizza operation on one side, but make no mistake: The restaurant side has memorable cuisine at low prices you'll long remember. Small enough for intimate dining (it seats only 36)
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now and then a menu comes along that is so appealing that the temptation to order everything on it is nearly irresistible. That's the case with Dolly's Place, a little-known restaurant in Blackwood with a mouth-watering selection of southern Italian dishes. Open since January, Dolly's is akin to those South Philadelphia neighborhood restaurants where the owner knows most of her customers and makes the rounds to ensure that everyone is happy. There's little worry of that, for the food is pleasant - although sometimes over-spiced - and prices are moderate.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Riding the boom in Italian restaurants that is sweeping South Jersey, Filomena Cucina Italiana has quickly become a fine place for good, home-cooked southern Italian cuisine. The small, attractively decorated restaurant opened several months ago in the Commerce Plaza I shopping center in Clementon with pleasant dishes at affordable prices. The mirrored dining room is decorated in a warm, vaguely Art Deco style. Ocean-green booths are spacious and comfortable, while tables with chocolate- colored covers are set with white cotton napkins, an oil-fed wick with hurricane shade and a bouquet of baby's breath and both white and beet-red carnations.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
There seems to be something special about the intersection of Fulton and Roebling Streets in the Chambersburg section of Trenton that attracts good restaurants. Johnny Boston's Cafe, generally acknowledged to be one of Trenton's best restaurants, occupied this location for many years until being succeeded in 1985 by Sal DeForte's Ristorante, a worthy replacement. Indeed, in an area filled with notable Italian restaurants, DeForte's is one of the best, although it is no match for nearby Francesco's.
FOOD
February 14, 2013
Makes 8 to 10 servings 1 onion, peeled and    quartered 6 ounces (approximate-    ly 11 slices) bacon or    pancetta Small handful fresh    parsley 1 clove garlic, peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups lentils, brown or    green, rinsed 14-ounce can diced    tomatoes, plus 12/3    cups cold water to    rinse out 2 bay leaves 21/2 quarts chicken or ...
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even at holiday times when we may be surfeited with fine food, the cuisine at Positano's, the marvelous northern Italian restaurant in Marple Township, is irresistibly appealing. Almost without exception, the food was memorable - and not only for the high prices. Each dish was perfectly prepared with fresh ingredients and finished in a light, beautifully balanced sauce. My favorite part of a recent meal was the pasta appetizers, notably al dente fettuccine with chunks of salmon and a hint of onion in a rich cream sauce brightened with vodka ($5.95)
FOOD
April 13, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Seven hundred years ago, Marco Polo returned to Italy from China and created what could be called the pasta revolution. Two hundred years ago next year, Thomas Jefferson brought pastamaking equipment from Italy to Monticello. About seven years ago, pasta machines suddenly began washing up on our shores, and an American revolution in the art of making pasta was born. "It came at just about the same time as the Cuisinart and other new kitchen implements," said Joe Lichtenberg, president of the National Pasta Association, in Washington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 14, 2013
Makes 8 to 10 servings 1 onion, peeled and    quartered 6 ounces (approximate-    ly 11 slices) bacon or    pancetta Small handful fresh    parsley 1 clove garlic, peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups lentils, brown or    green, rinsed 14-ounce can diced    tomatoes, plus 12/3    cups cold water to    rinse out 2 bay leaves 21/2 quarts chicken or ...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
1 whole egg 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese or part pecorino and part Parmesan ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon salt 4 ounces spaghetti 2 teaspoons unsalted butter (or use salted butter and less salt) 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces pancetta cut into ¼-inch-thick slices (substitute 4 strips crumbled bacon or 4 tablespoons bacon bits)   1. In a large bowl, whisk together egg, cheese, and pepper. Keep bowl near stove.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
ROME - They twirled, they sniffed, they slurped, they chewed. The dozen homemakers who gathered at a Rome hotel on a recent afternoon took their work terribly seriously, rating plates of pasta for chewiness, saltiness, gumminess, or done-ness - that perfect balance known as al dente, or firm to the bite. Pasta is serious business in Italy, and the recent blind taste test by the world's biggest pasta-maker drove home that an awful lot of thought goes into making the simple combination of durum wheat semolina and water from which Italy's national dish is made.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
It was the summer of our discontent. Where to begin? An earthquake, a hurricane, and a visit from Mother Mary. A disaster trifecta. The perfect storm of catastrophes. The Manny, Moe, and Jack of nightmares. Just kidding. She was here for two months, and now that she's gone back to Miami, I miss her. When I feel sad, I turn on Everybody Loves Raymond , really really REALLY LOUD. And then I don't miss her anymore. She came up because a sewer main broke under her house, necessitating all manner of repair work, and I figured it would be best if she wasn't there to tell the workmen they were working too hard or they were really cute.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It had been seven years since my last visit to Peppino's, and I must confess that the passage of time had dimmed my memory of the spectacular dishes at this popular Somerdale restaurant. A recent visit not only refreshed my memory but showed that Peppino's was as good as ever. Its home-cooked delights are made with incredibly fresh ingredients, and portions are enormous beyond belief. Indeed, it is probably impossible to leave without a wheelbarrow heaped with enough leftovers to last the rest of the week.
FOOD
September 11, 1991 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
Someday maybe we will understand why "spaghetti sauce" automatically means something based on ground meat and canned tomatoes that have been simmered for hours on end: and maybe someday the people who make menus will learn that primavera means spring. But these quandaries need not concern us when the late summer harvest is rolling in. All we need to do at the moment is enjoy. Pasta and fresh vegetables is a concept capable of infinite variety. Tomatoes are not required - try a sauce of grilled eggplant mashed with olive oil and lemon, given texture with a few toasted walnuts.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fast proliferating, Italian restaurants are all the rage these days; indeed, dozens of new places have been opening the past year or so in seemingly endless splendor. But few can match the quality of the home cooking at the new Riviera Ristorante & Pizza in Sharp's Run Plaza outside Medford. Riviera shares space with a pizza operation on one side, but make no mistake: The restaurant side has memorable cuisine at low prices you'll long remember. Small enough for intimate dining (it seats only 36)
FOOD
March 21, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Pasta that boils to al dente in 10 or 12 minutes is always a boon to cooks in a hurry. Pasta that doesn't need to be boiled at all is even more of a busy-day helper. In the recipe that follows, thin spaghetti, called spaghettini, is broken into two-inch lengths and added to stir-fried broccoli rabe with a small amount of chicken broth. The pasta cooks with the broccoli in about 10 to 12 minutes. And no, the result is neither starchy nor mushy. Broccoli rabe is the distinctive, thin-stemmed broccoli beloved by Italian cooks for its interesting, slightly bitter flavor.
FOOD
December 10, 1989 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
If we're not careful, al dente is liable to die from misuse. Born of the best intentions, al dente was to be the savior of olive-drab string beans and sodden spinach. In a revolution of crispness and color, it redefined what vegetable cooking was, rescuing the downtrodden side dish from decades of boiling abuse. Al dente - an Italian phrase that describes the fleeting moment in cooking when an ingredient has lost its crispness but is not yet fully soft - literally translates as "to the tooth.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Riding the boom in Italian restaurants that is sweeping South Jersey, Filomena Cucina Italiana has quickly become a fine place for good, home-cooked southern Italian cuisine. The small, attractively decorated restaurant opened several months ago in the Commerce Plaza I shopping center in Clementon with pleasant dishes at affordable prices. The mirrored dining room is decorated in a warm, vaguely Art Deco style. Ocean-green booths are spacious and comfortable, while tables with chocolate- colored covers are set with white cotton napkins, an oil-fed wick with hurricane shade and a bouquet of baby's breath and both white and beet-red carnations.
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