CollectionsAl Sharpton
IN THE NEWS

Al Sharpton

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 10, 2009
I HAVE some questions regarding the recent article about the school police officers allegedly holding down a student and beating him: Why is the president of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Action Network and Al Sharpton getting involved? Why is it that whenever something negative happens to a black person it is turned into a racial matter? What about the poor Asian students who were physically and emotionally attacked by black students simply because they are Asian?
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contributors include the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post, the New York Post, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Al Sharpton has been offered a "seat of honor" by Cardinal John O'Connor at his St. Patrick's Day Mass and it looks as if the activist will march in the Big Apple parade. He asked the cardinal to get him a "ticket" to Irish festivities after no marching groups invited him. "I am honored that the cardinal has chosen to recognize me," said Sharpton. "I still hope to be an invited marcher. " But he indicated he would march invited or not. GOING FOR THE GREEN Carmel Quinn, who performed on those old Arthur Godfrey TV shows, will sing Irish ditties - you expected maybe Croatian folk songs?
LIVING
April 2, 1996 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The voice on the other end of the telephone responded in a gravelly baritone. "You're here, in the hotel?" he asks. "We'll be right down. " The voice sounded right on. Just the way you had expected the Rev. Al Sharpton to sound. Authoritative. And seasoned with a dash of black Baptist-preacher cadence reminiscent of Jesse Jackson. Would he be an embodiment of TV sound bites and sensational headlines, full of bluster and bravado? This man, after all, has made noise. He's been at the forefront of every African American grievance in New York over the last 10 years.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Al Sharpton's public makeover continues. The feisty, often inflammatory New York civil rights activist, who toned down the rhetoric to broaden his appeal in the 1997 New York City mayoral Democratic primary, offered up an inspired but relatively nonconfrontational pitch to Penn students yesterday to further the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream for social justice and equity. A University of Pennsylvania board of students and faculty had tapped Sharpton to deliver this year's keynote address as part of a six-week flurry of events to commemorate Dr. King and his legacy.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
NEW YORK - Pat Buchanan said that he didn't mean to slur President Obama by referring to him as "your boy" during a discussion with Al Sharpton. The former GOP presidential candidate and current MSNBC analyst appeared on "Morning Joe" yesterday to explain remarks he made on that network's Sharpton show 12 hours earlier. They were discussing Obama's political strength when Buchanan said that "your boy" had caved in past negotiations and was likely to do so again. "My what?"
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Roddie A. Burris INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
The Rev. Al Sharpton might not win a single primary, and even he concedes that a move to the White House next January is unlikely. But he was feeling anything but defeated this week as he toured South Carolina, site of a pivotal Democratic presidential primary Feb. 3. "I'm so happy I can hardly stay seated today," he said in Columbia, minutes after delivering the second of three dynamic sermons in South Carolina. "Al Sharpton can't lose," he told a full sanctuary in Florence.
NEWS
May 12, 2005
RE MICHAEL Smerconish's "Think Rodney King, but Upside-Down": He writes: "We'll be spared an insufferable visit to town by Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and the rest of those who make a living doing nothing but stoking the fires of racial unrest. " I remember he wrote a column seemingly scolding the "black community" for the positive attention afforded Omarosa, the infamous reality-show contestant, by the likes of Oprah Winfrey and the NAACP, while puzzled that these two groups hadn't offered the same to Condoleezza Rice, a woman significantly more accomplished.
NEWS
January 17, 2004 | By Carl Chancellor INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
The Rev. Al Sharpton who appears on television these days is very different from his media image of the past. The transformation was never more clear than on the evening of Dec. 6. Standing in front of NBC cameras, in a conservative blue suit and tie with his trademark slicked-back hair, Sharpton welcomed viewers to Saturday Night Live. His appearance on the comedy show served to highlight, if not a new warm and cuddly persona, at least an affable and much less strident Sharpton.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | By Jill Nelson
It has been kind of a dry political season here in New York City. Along with many others, I was looking forward to the Rev. Al Sharpton's release from prison Aug. 17. The emergence of Sharpton, sentenced to 90 days for trespassing during a protest of the Navy's six decades of using the Puerto Rican island of Vieques as a target for bombing practice, and his reentry into city politics was much anticipated. Given the long line of activists for social change who have been humbled, transformed and deeply enlightened by the experience of imprisonment, a rite of passage, I was eager to see what positive changes Reverend Al's incarceration might have wrought.
NEWS
July 24, 2000 | by Regina Medina and Catherine Lucey, Daily News Staff Writers
About 1,500 people gathered last night inside and outside a North Philadelphia church to hear noted local and national speakers call for an end to what they called police brutality and racism in the wake of the videotaped arrest of Thomas Jones. Earlier in the day at City Hall, a police-friendly crowd showed support in the "Blue Sunday Rally," organized by radio show host Dom Giordano of WPHT-AM (1210). Inside the Morris Brown A.M.E. Church, the cries from 300 to 500 men and women outside who weren't able to get a seat inside were heard as the speakers addressed the standing-room only crowd of 1,000 people.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE REV. Al Sharpton has seen lots of hardball politics, dating back to his stint as youth coordinator for upstart Rep. Shirley Chisholm in the 1972 presidential race, but he says he's never seen anything quite like the way current GOP'ers in D.C. are going after President Obama. "They've handled this president differently than any other president, including preceding Democrats like [Bill] Clinton," the civil-rights activist and MSNBC host said last night in a phone interview. "With all that they gave Clinton, they never asked him for his birth certificate . . . they never fought him like this.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
NEW YORK - Pat Buchanan said that he didn't mean to slur President Obama by referring to him as "your boy" during a discussion with Al Sharpton. The former GOP presidential candidate and current MSNBC analyst appeared on "Morning Joe" yesterday to explain remarks he made on that network's Sharpton show 12 hours earlier. They were discussing Obama's political strength when Buchanan said that "your boy" had caved in past negotiations and was likely to do so again. "My what?"
NEWS
December 10, 2009
I HAVE some questions regarding the recent article about the school police officers allegedly holding down a student and beating him: Why is the president of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Action Network and Al Sharpton getting involved? Why is it that whenever something negative happens to a black person it is turned into a racial matter? What about the poor Asian students who were physically and emotionally attacked by black students simply because they are Asian?
NEWS
July 25, 2008 | By Deneen Borelli
Al Sharpton is making headlines again, but it's not for one of his crusades. Instead, Sharpton, his National Action Network (NAN), and several major corporations that have donated to NAN have been subpoenaed in recent months by federal investigators. While Sharpton's attorneys reported Tuesday that the criminal probe over millions allegedly owed in taxes by Sharpton and NAN has been dropped in lieu of civil action by the IRS, federal authorities remain tight-lipped over the status of any investigations.
NEWS
January 17, 2008 | By Mychal Massie
If a tree falls in the forest with no one there to hear it, does it make a noise? Likewise, if someone says something inappropriate and Al Sharpton isn't around to hear it, is it really racist? Sportscaster Kelly Tilghman of the Golf Channel is likely pondering this right now. She has apologized for a recent ill-considered comment and has been suspended by her employer, but Sharpton - coming in late in the game - wants more. He belatedly wants her fired, and he is taking the Golf Channel to task.
NEWS
March 1, 2007 | By Courtland Milloy
Kunta could tell that some were Foulah, Jola, Serere and Wolof . . . but most were Mandinkas. - From "Roots," by Alex Haley, 1976 And during their African journey from slavery to freedom, they became Jeffersons, Johnsons, Richardsons and Wrights. And Al Sharpton, too. So Sharpton, civil rights activist, is descended from a slave owned by relatives of segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. Big deal. How about whether Sharpton is descended from Mandinka royalty in Mali or sheep herders in Gambia?
NEWS
May 12, 2005
RE MICHAEL Smerconish's "Think Rodney King, but Upside-Down": He writes: "We'll be spared an insufferable visit to town by Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and the rest of those who make a living doing nothing but stoking the fires of racial unrest. " I remember he wrote a column seemingly scolding the "black community" for the positive attention afforded Omarosa, the infamous reality-show contestant, by the likes of Oprah Winfrey and the NAACP, while puzzled that these two groups hadn't offered the same to Condoleezza Rice, a woman significantly more accomplished.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Roddie A. Burris INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
The Rev. Al Sharpton might not win a single primary, and even he concedes that a move to the White House next January is unlikely. But he was feeling anything but defeated this week as he toured South Carolina, site of a pivotal Democratic presidential primary Feb. 3. "I'm so happy I can hardly stay seated today," he said in Columbia, minutes after delivering the second of three dynamic sermons in South Carolina. "Al Sharpton can't lose," he told a full sanctuary in Florence.
NEWS
January 17, 2004 | By Carl Chancellor INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
The Rev. Al Sharpton who appears on television these days is very different from his media image of the past. The transformation was never more clear than on the evening of Dec. 6. Standing in front of NBC cameras, in a conservative blue suit and tie with his trademark slicked-back hair, Sharpton welcomed viewers to Saturday Night Live. His appearance on the comedy show served to highlight, if not a new warm and cuddly persona, at least an affable and much less strident Sharpton.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | By Jill Nelson
It has been kind of a dry political season here in New York City. Along with many others, I was looking forward to the Rev. Al Sharpton's release from prison Aug. 17. The emergence of Sharpton, sentenced to 90 days for trespassing during a protest of the Navy's six decades of using the Puerto Rican island of Vieques as a target for bombing practice, and his reentry into city politics was much anticipated. Given the long line of activists for social change who have been humbled, transformed and deeply enlightened by the experience of imprisonment, a rite of passage, I was eager to see what positive changes Reverend Al's incarceration might have wrought.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|