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Alan Dershowitz

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NEWS
August 27, 1991 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
For our first-ever chutzpah lesson, mind you, we are not situated in the Capital of Chutzpah. "This is just a suburb," says our teacher, Alan Dershowitz, gesturing toward the East River. "Over there - Brooklyn - that's the capital of chutzpah. Just to survive, you need maximal chutzpah. " Our teacher thinks we may not require chutzpah lessons, maximal, lite or otherwise. After all, long-stemmed songthrush Carly Simon paid $800 for her class (the fee went to charity). But we asked Dershowitz - Harvard law professor, best-selling Chutzpah author, Nightline staple, and a stranger to us - for ours gratis, which is Latin for bubkes.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It's an all-star team like no other, featuring the flamboyance of an F. Lee Bailey, the craftiness of an Alan Dershowitz and the laser-beam focus of a Robert Shapiro. Hall of Famers of the law. They might not fill a football stadium, but in the staid legal world, they are every bit as powerful and dominant as O.J. Simpson was in his. With Simpson's very life and freedom hanging in the balance, some of the keenest and the best-known legal minds in the country have leapt to his defense.
NEWS
April 18, 1992
Leona Helmsley is in jail, and Alan Dershowitz, the man who sees an important human rights issue every time somebody filthy rich gets in trouble, is livid. He says the Queen of Mean doesn't belong in the joint. After all, it is reasoned, she didn't murder or rape anybody. A flexible man, Dershowitz doesn't believe rich rapists belong in jail either, having secured Mike Tyson as a client, but that's another matter. So is the concept of actually punishing white-collar criminals.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just days before he was scheduled to be executed, convicted murderer Antuan Bronshtein changed his mind yesterday about refusing to pursue his right of appeal and was granted a 120-day stay of execution in federal court. Bronshtein, 28, a Philadelphia man found guilty in the 1991 murder of King of Prussia jeweler Alexander Gutman, was scheduled to die May 4. He was to face the executioner in April, but Gov. Ridge agreed to postpone the date until after the Jewish holiday of Passover.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | By Alissa Rubin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The nomination of John M. Walker to the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ran into criticism Tuesday over a family matter: He is President Bush's first cousin. At a lively hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, a Harvard Law School professor argued that the President, who nominated Walker for the job, had violated the federal anti-nepotism law. The law prohibits any federal employee, including the president, from appointing a relative to a position over which the person has supervision or control.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Shaun D. Mullen The New York Daily News and New York Post contributed to this report
DAYS OF WHINE AND ROSES. If a conservative is a liberal who has been mugged, Alan Dershowitz might be described as a civil libertarian who has heard one excuse too many. Dershowitz is a one-man P.R. machine who has parlayed a successful career as an academic and courtroom lawyer into a Niagara of op-ed pieces, TV talk- show appearances and books. He'll supervise the appeals O.J. Simpson's legal team files after the trial - if they need to. His latest tome is "The Abuse Excuse. " It was written before he joined the Simpson team, but is uncannily apropos of aspects of the case and arrives at a time when the backlash against the "excuse gifted" even pervades election campaigns.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angered by Alan Dershowitz's recent allegations that police are trained to lie, about 60 officers and their supporters last night picketed an Elkins Park synagogue where the famed defense lawyer was scheduled to speak. "I feel it's totally unfair," said John Stanton, a Cheltenham Township police officer for 23 years, as he marched outside of Congregation Adath Jeshurun on Old York Road. "It's an outrage. It's a slap in the face for everybody out here doing law enforcement. " Dershowitz, a member of O.J. Simpson's defense team, said March 15 on ABC's Good Morning America that "Not only do police departments tell their detectives it's OK to lie, they learn it in the academy.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's not easy becoming a famous mouth. But once you get there, you've got it made. You become a hot commodity for the audio genre. Take Rush Limbaugh. The "most popular radio talk show host in America," if the publicists are to be believed, carries on for 2 1/2 hours for the adaptation of his book, The Way Things Ought To Be, and Simon & Schuster charges 17 bucks. Not a bad deal (for the company), especially considering that that's the upper end of the going rate for a longer, three-hour package.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
The legal experts are debating whether the William Kennedy Smith trial should have been shown on TV. Or whether any trial should be on the tube. There's nothing new about this dispute. Some lawyers argue that courtroom cameras can make witnesses self-conscious or hams and ruin a fair trial. Other lawyers say that in a democracy, the legal process should be open for all to see. Then there is the view of Alan Dershowitz, the colorful law professor who seems to spend as much time on talk shows as he does at Harvard.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
"Terrorist on Trial: the United States vs. Salim Ajami" (10 p.m. Sunday on Channel 10) is a strange duck of a show. Its plot and focal character are supremely prejudicial. The message its producers are presenting is pompous. Its subject matter panders indelicately to the basest fears of many average Americans that someone is always out to get us. And yet "Terrorist on Trial" is amazingly good entertainment with something to say, if not about the world geopolitical situation, then about the complexity of the human condition.
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SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
SELDOM DOES a baseball player arrive late for a game and get mobbed by delirious teammates and coaches. These circumstances were rather special, however, and roughly 90 minutes later, they were followed by a wonderful accomplishment. University City High, set to close next month, is in school year No. 40 of Public League membership. These Jaguars now own the only perfect regular season in the school's diamond history (12-0 in Division D), as well as only the third unblemished mark in one of the three major sports (11-0 in basketball in 1995; 4-0 in football in 2008)
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just days before he was scheduled to be executed, convicted murderer Antuan Bronshtein changed his mind yesterday about refusing to pursue his right of appeal and was granted a 120-day stay of execution in federal court. Bronshtein, 28, a Philadelphia man found guilty in the 1991 murder of King of Prussia jeweler Alexander Gutman, was scheduled to die May 4. He was to face the executioner in April, but Gov. Ridge agreed to postpone the date until after the Jewish holiday of Passover.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angered by Alan Dershowitz's recent allegations that police are trained to lie, about 60 officers and their supporters last night picketed an Elkins Park synagogue where the famed defense lawyer was scheduled to speak. "I feel it's totally unfair," said John Stanton, a Cheltenham Township police officer for 23 years, as he marched outside of Congregation Adath Jeshurun on Old York Road. "It's an outrage. It's a slap in the face for everybody out here doing law enforcement. " Dershowitz, a member of O.J. Simpson's defense team, said March 15 on ABC's Good Morning America that "Not only do police departments tell their detectives it's OK to lie, they learn it in the academy.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Shaun D. Mullen The New York Daily News and New York Post contributed to this report
DAYS OF WHINE AND ROSES. If a conservative is a liberal who has been mugged, Alan Dershowitz might be described as a civil libertarian who has heard one excuse too many. Dershowitz is a one-man P.R. machine who has parlayed a successful career as an academic and courtroom lawyer into a Niagara of op-ed pieces, TV talk- show appearances and books. He'll supervise the appeals O.J. Simpson's legal team files after the trial - if they need to. His latest tome is "The Abuse Excuse. " It was written before he joined the Simpson team, but is uncannily apropos of aspects of the case and arrives at a time when the backlash against the "excuse gifted" even pervades election campaigns.
LIVING
October 10, 1994 | This story contains material from Inquirer TV columnist Gail Shister and the Associated Press
California Superior Court Judge Lance Ito may want to ban cameras from the courtroom where O.J. Simpson faces justice, but that won't stop one of the Juice's superstar lawyers, Alan S. Dershowitz, from hitting your network television screens. Dershowitz, never one to be camera shy, on Friday taped a segment of the CBS series Picket Fences, with recent Emmy winner Fyvush Finkel. At the Los Angeles taping, Dershowitz played himself and Finkel portrayed his Fences character, lawyer Douglas Wambaugh.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It's an all-star team like no other, featuring the flamboyance of an F. Lee Bailey, the craftiness of an Alan Dershowitz and the laser-beam focus of a Robert Shapiro. Hall of Famers of the law. They might not fill a football stadium, but in the staid legal world, they are every bit as powerful and dominant as O.J. Simpson was in his. With Simpson's very life and freedom hanging in the balance, some of the keenest and the best-known legal minds in the country have leapt to his defense.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's not easy becoming a famous mouth. But once you get there, you've got it made. You become a hot commodity for the audio genre. Take Rush Limbaugh. The "most popular radio talk show host in America," if the publicists are to be believed, carries on for 2 1/2 hours for the adaptation of his book, The Way Things Ought To Be, and Simon & Schuster charges 17 bucks. Not a bad deal (for the company), especially considering that that's the upper end of the going rate for a longer, three-hour package.
NEWS
April 18, 1992
Leona Helmsley is in jail, and Alan Dershowitz, the man who sees an important human rights issue every time somebody filthy rich gets in trouble, is livid. He says the Queen of Mean doesn't belong in the joint. After all, it is reasoned, she didn't murder or rape anybody. A flexible man, Dershowitz doesn't believe rich rapists belong in jail either, having secured Mike Tyson as a client, but that's another matter. So is the concept of actually punishing white-collar criminals.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
The legal experts are debating whether the William Kennedy Smith trial should have been shown on TV. Or whether any trial should be on the tube. There's nothing new about this dispute. Some lawyers argue that courtroom cameras can make witnesses self-conscious or hams and ruin a fair trial. Other lawyers say that in a democracy, the legal process should be open for all to see. Then there is the view of Alan Dershowitz, the colorful law professor who seems to spend as much time on talk shows as he does at Harvard.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
For our first-ever chutzpah lesson, mind you, we are not situated in the Capital of Chutzpah. "This is just a suburb," says our teacher, Alan Dershowitz, gesturing toward the East River. "Over there - Brooklyn - that's the capital of chutzpah. Just to survive, you need maximal chutzpah. " Our teacher thinks we may not require chutzpah lessons, maximal, lite or otherwise. After all, long-stemmed songthrush Carly Simon paid $800 for her class (the fee went to charity). But we asked Dershowitz - Harvard law professor, best-selling Chutzpah author, Nightline staple, and a stranger to us - for ours gratis, which is Latin for bubkes.
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