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Albert Barnes

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
February 18, 1998 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Richard H. Glanton most likely never said, in the manner of Louis XIV, "Le Barnes c'est moi," but he certainly acted as if it were. Through seven and one-half years as board president and de facto director of the Barnes Foundation, Glanton achieved a remarkable feat of magic. He made four adult human beings - his fellow trustees - virtually disappear. Largely through his own efforts, he came to personify the foundation at home and abroad. To the public, he became a savior who liberated the foundation's fabulous secret art collection for the enjoyment of art-lovers around the world.
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fund-raising at the Barnes Foundation can continue, despite the protest of a neighbor of the art museum who complained that the will of the late Albert Barnes explicitly banned such events. A three-judge panel of state Superior Court has upheld a Montgomery County Court ruling that threw out a petition by Robert Marmon, who lives across the street from the world-famous museum in Lower Merion Township. The museum's celebrated collection includes early French modern and post-impressionist paintings, including masterpieces by Renoir, Cezanne, and Matisse.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
Some writers, Woody Allen once observed, "try to achieve immortality through their work. I personally prefer to achieve immortality by not dying. " Woody Allen had it right. You can't take it with you, but that fact of life hasn't stopped many foolish people from trying to control the future from beyond the grave. On his death in 1831, the great merchant Stephen Girard left $2 million to the city of Philadelphia to establish a school for "poor white male orphans. " His will stipulated the operations of Girard College in such obsessive detail that the school remained racially segregated as late as 1968.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Laura Leggett Barnes was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1874 into an old family that came to colonial America from the island of Barbados in the 18th century. She is remembered as petite, blond, blue-eyed and a faultless dresser. Those who knew her well described her as quiet, reserved, bright, and very much a lady. She was in sharp contrast to Albert Barnes of Philadelphia who, although he had a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania, came from a working-class family in the city's Kensington section and was a self-made man. Throughout his lifetime, Barnes developed a reputation as being abrasive, arrogant and contentious.
NEWS
June 10, 2003 | By Bruce H. Mann
Opponents of the Barnes Foundation's petition to move from Lower Merion to the Parkway claim that part of that petition - the proposal to expand the board of trustees - is a racially-motivated effort by white-dominated foundations to wrest control of the Barnes from Lincoln University, the oldest historically black college in the nation. This serious charge has given both donors and the public pause in considering whether to relocate the magnificent art treasure that is the Barnes Foundation.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Barnes Foundation, which parted ways with director Kimberly Camp in June, has named a search firm to find a new director who would lead the effort to move the Barnes' art gallery from Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Malcolm MacKay, a New York-based headhunter for nonprofit organizations at the international recruiting firm Russell Reynolds Associates, will lead the search, the Barnes said yesterday. It selected MacKay at its board meeting Friday and Saturday, said Claire Whittaker, outside spokeswoman for the Barnes.
NEWS
July 8, 2003
LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, the historically black college in Chester County that is desperately trying to hold onto control of the Barnes Foundation, fought to have a forensic audit on the institution released to the public. It's not hard to see why. The audit strongly suggests that when Lincoln had control, it didn't use it. Former president, Richard Glanton, a Lincoln appointee, did pretty much what he pleased, without accountability. The evidence makes it harder for Lincoln to show why it should continue to have control over a potentially expanded board of directors, as it has petitioned the Montgomery County Court.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2004 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moving its priceless collection of art to a new Center City gallery has been the Barnes Foundation's goal for the last 17 months. Since it proposed the move, the Barnes has received more than $100 million in pledges and zeroed in on a potential site for the museum. And it went to court last month to get approval for the move. But before the judge even considers the feasibility of the move to Center City, he must wrestle with whether he should grant the Barnes the right to move at all. Last month, after a four-day court hearing in Norristown on the Barnes proposal, Montgomery County Orphans' Court Judge Stanley Ott asked for more information from both the Barnes Foundation trustees and from three students who went to court to oppose the move.
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania Attorney General Mike Fisher has asked the Barnes Foundation to make more than a dozen changes to its petition requesting court permission to rewrite its governing laws and move its famed art collection from Lower Merion to Center City. Among the changes Fisher proposed are a ban on selling any of the art that is on display in the Barnes gallery, and the preservation of founder Albert C. Barnes' arrangements of the artwork in unique ensembles. The Barnes board is to meet today at 9 a.m. to consider the changes, said Kimberly Camp, the foundation's executive director.
NEWS
April 29, 2009
FURTHERMORE ... Hidden costs in moving the Youth Study Center The editorial criticizing "councilmanic privilege," in connection with Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell's holding up a site for the new Youth Study Center at a price to the city, state, and the PHA of $12 million, was commendable ("While families wait," Thursday). However, not included in that figure are the millions of taxpayer dollars in expenses, caused by the delay necessitating an interim move, and the cost of rehabbing the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute for use as a temporary YSC. Plus, there is the questionable giveaway of valuable city property to a private institution, particularly in view of the fact that it appears that the city did not engage in a feasibility study of its merit.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending an often testy and sometimes distant 25-year coexistence, the Barnes Foundation will merge with the foundation established by the estate of Violette de Mazia, Albert C. Barnes' longtime colleague. The Violette de Mazia Foundation - whose sole purpose has been to promulgate and support art education based on the formalist pedagogical principles of Barnes, de Mazia, and the philosopher John Dewey - will form the core of the Barnes-de Mazia Education Program, to be based at the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Barnes Foundation has selected Thomas Collins, head of the resurgent Pérez Art Museum in Miami, to be its new chief executive and president, the museum announced Wednesday. A native of the Philadelphia area, Collins, 46, will assume the post in March at an institution that is now in its third year on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. He succeeds Derek Gillman, who guided the Barnes from 2006 to 2013, when the Barnes successfully, if sometimes contentiously, moved its spectacular collection of impressionist and early modernist art from its longtime home in Merion to Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Derek Gillman, the British-born executive director and president of the Barnes Foundation who guided it through the latter stages of a controversial move from its longtime home in suburban Merion to a grand new gallery on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, announced his resignation Tuesday. Gillman, 60, will become a visiting professor at Drexel University's Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, where he will teach in a new museum leadership program and in the art history department.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
For Albert Barnes, the French impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir was a magnificent obsession on a scale that defies both reason and understanding. Between 1912, when he acquired his first nine Renoirs, and 1942, when he bought his last two, the founder of the Barnes Foundation gathered under his roof 178 Renoir oils of various sizes and subjects (as well as a pastel drawing, a lithograph, and a sculpture). Perhaps the best explanation of this amazing prodigality comes from the collector himself, as quoted on page 33 of the foundation's new comprehensive catalog of its Renoirs: "I have never experienced from Renoir's work the ennui or disgust with the platitudinous emptiness and general damn rot that I have found in the work of practically every other man represented in my collection from Delacroix to Picasso.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Donald Eckard
The shotgun wedding of the Barnes Foundation and Philadelphia has finally taken place, complete with preview parties and self-congratulations among the city's movers (literally) and shakers — precisely as cranky old Dr. Barnes would have hated. The new home of the fabled art collection has not impressed some of Albert Barnes' disciples, who insist on pesky reminders that the new place on the Parkway is an egregious violation of his will. Supporters of the move comically argue that the new open-door museum is what Barnes really would have wanted, even though he kept his galleries closed to all but the foundation's students during his lifetime.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
It has been said in various bits of commentary and reportage surrounding this month's opening of the new Barnes Foundation building that Albert Barnes wanted his collection to be shared with the general public.   Not so. Albert C. Barnes didn't want hoi polloi cluttering up his galleries because he believed that wandering into any art museum unprepared by the kind of instruction his school offered was nonsensical and a waste of time. Obviously, if he had wanted an open-door policy, he would have initiated one. He had 26 years to do so before he died.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2012 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
It took decades for Albert Barnes to amass his eclectic collection and years of negotiations to get it into a new home on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, so its momentous opening weekend will be celebrated with 56 consecutive hours of free events. "This really is a celebration, and we want to do as much as possible, since public programming is clearly new to the Barnes," said Kathleen Greene, the public programming manager. Most of the timed tickets for the opening weekend sold out weeks ago, but the Barnes is holding back a few tickets a day for walk-up visitors, plus whatever may be turned back by those who bought them earlier.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Surrounded by the great squares of scored limestone quarried from the Negev Desert and now gracing the walls of the light court of the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the city's business, political, social and civic elite gathered Thursday evening to honor two of their own: Joe Neubauer and Aileen Roberts, winners of this year's Philadelphia Award. Neubauer, who just stepped down as chief executive of Aramark Corp., the food services giant, and Roberts, a philanthropist trained as a landscape architect, were instrumental in bringing the Barnes Foundation to Philadelphia from its original and only home on 12 arboreal acres in Merion.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Matt Huston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stalwarts of Philly's museum district are welcoming their new neighbor, the Barnes Foundation, with biblical scrolls, Barnes-inspired selections, and answers to big questions. The Barnes opens its treasure trove of impressionists and modernists this weekend, but art and culture seekers don't have to stop there. Art and anthropology await visitors to other museums on and near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The biggest rival to the Barnes kickoff is best introduced with an ancient declaration: "In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
EVERY ART LOVER and his mother-in-law's brother's third cousin will be at the Barnes Foundation this weekend looking to get in on its first free fete. But, um, you guys know the art isn't going to disappear in an Impressionist-style puff of smoke, right? So be a rebel and skip the crowds this weekend in favor of some other Barnes-related activities. Themed museums Our big cultural institutions — a club the Barnes is now a member of — get all the attention, but what about the little guys?
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