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Albert Barnes

NEWS
May 25, 2007 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Fairmount Park Commission in a special meeting last night approved a proposed lease that would allow the Barnes Foundation's museum and school to move to Philadelphia. Now it will be up to the City Council to approve the lease which Joseph Grace, Mayor Street's spokesman, said the administration hopes will happens before the Council ends its session next month. For a payment of $10, the foundation, now based in Merion, would get a 99-year lease on the site of Youth Study Center on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Once the hoopla of its grand opening has subsided in May, the Barnes Foundation will be open six days a week, Wednesday through Monday, from 9:30 in the morning until 6 at night. Adults will shell out $18 for a ticket to enter the gallery, opening officially to the general public May 19 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. (Seniors will pay $15 and students $10; children 5 and under are free.) A series of opening events will culiminate in 60 hours of round-the-clock free public access over Memorial Day weekend, May 26 to May 28. "The general admission prices and the membership benefits are in line with our sister institutions," said Andrew Stewart, a Barnes spokesman.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Once the hoopla of its grand opening has subsided in May, the Barnes Foundation will be open six days a week, Wednesday through Monday, from 9:30 in the morning until 6 at night. Single adults will shell out $18 for a ticket to enter the new gallery, opening officially to the general public May 19 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. A series of opening events will culiminate in 60 hours of round-the-clock free public access over Memorial Day weekend, May 26 to May 28. After that the new pricing structure kicks in. "The general admission prices and the membership benefits are in line with our sister institutions," said Andrew Stewart, a Barnes spokesman.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Barnes Foundation announced today that it has surpassed the $200 million fund-raising target for construction of its new facility on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia. The foundation, which has struggled financially in its longtime location in Merion, also reported that it has seen rapid growth in museum membership - from 400 members two years ago to over 10,000 now. "Surpassing our initial fund-raising mark and attracting thousands of members clearly demonstrate enthusiasm for the Barnes Foundation's compelling vision of access and openness," said Bernard C. Watson, chairman of the foundation's board of trustees, in a statement.
NEWS
March 26, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The state attorney general and the Barnes Foundation have asked Montgomery County Orphans' Court to dismiss the eleventh-hour legal effort to block the relocation of the foundation's renowned art collection from Merion to Philadelphia. The latest turn in the lengthy legal proceedings over the Barnes and its trove of Cezannes, Renoirs, Matisses, and other masters came after opponents of the move filed a court petition last month to reopen the case. In that petition, the Friends of the Barnes asked Judge Stanley R. Ott, who has presided over the case since 2002, to take another look, based largely on quotes from the 2009 documentary movie The Art of the Steal . The Barnes and the attorney general argue in their responses that there is nothing new in the opponents' legal briefs or the movie, and that the Friends of the Barnes and its members cannot intervene in the case anyway because they have no legal standing.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joanna McQuail Reed, 85, whose four-acre garden near Malvern attracted visitors from all over the world, died Monday of congestive heart failure at Phoenixville Hospital in Chester County. Mrs. Reed, who until about a year ago could be found working in her garden at almost any time of the day, gardened for more than 60 years at Longview Farm, creating what many considered a living work of art. Garden and gardener were featured in about 100 articles in magazines and newspapers over the years, said her daughters Jane Lennon and Susie Novoa, as well as in six or seven books.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"The Art of the Steal" is a documentary posing as a heist movie - the heist being our city fathers' confiscation of Albert Barnes' priceless art. The movie sides with a coalition of Barnes' friends, students and art lovers who've actively opposed efforts to uproot his suburban collection and convert it into a downtown tourist site and cash machine. Will this rebel alliance succeed, the movie asks, or "will a man's will be broken and one of America's greatest cultural monuments be destroyed?"
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Nicholas M. Tinari Jr
By Nicholas M. Tinari Jr.   The opening of the Barnes Foundation gallery in Philadelphia raises two emotions for me. The first is anger at the gross betrayal of Albert Barnes' remarkable gift, and the second is sadness — for something truly unique is gone, not only an art collection in the perfect setting, but an original idea. Barnes established the foundation in 1922 with an Indenture of Trust to ensure its primary function of systematic education through direct interaction with the art collection.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
When Albert C. Barnes was calling the shots, the door to his incomparable hoard of modern masterpieces was relatively open to the poor, and closed to the privileged. James Michener, the author, figured this out only after he was denied entry on three occasions. The fourth time he posed as a barely literate Pittsburgh steelworker. Access granted. Well, Barnes is long since dead, and now that the elites have his collection, the time apparently has come for the poor to get out. Instead of slumming it to get in, the city's powerful are clearing the slums, lest the presence of homeless men and women offend patrons of the new and supposedly improved Barnes Foundation, set to open on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in May. The official story is that the new ban Mayor Nutter announced last week on the outdoor feeding of homeless people has nothing to do with the Barnes.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2004 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the fate of one of the world's greatest private art collections in his hands, Montgomery County Orphans' Court Judge Stanley Ott will issue a decision this morning on the Barnes Foundation's proposal to move its gallery from its garden setting in Lower Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Center City. The judge's office said yesterday that he would meet privately with attorneys in the case at 11 a.m. today. After that, the opinion will be made public. Harvey Wank, one of three Barnes art students who contested the foundation's proposal in court, learned yesterday while on his way to class at the foundation that the decision would come down today.
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