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Albert Barnes

NEWS
May 25, 2007 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Fairmount Park Commission in a special meeting last night approved a proposed lease that would allow the Barnes Foundation's museum and school to move to Philadelphia. Now it will be up to the City Council to approve the lease which Joseph Grace, Mayor Street's spokesman, said the administration hopes will happens before the Council ends its session next month. For a payment of $10, the foundation, now based in Merion, would get a 99-year lease on the site of Youth Study Center on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Once the hoopla of its grand opening has subsided in May, the Barnes Foundation will be open six days a week, Wednesday through Monday, from 9:30 in the morning until 6 at night. Adults will shell out $18 for a ticket to enter the gallery, opening officially to the general public May 19 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. (Seniors will pay $15 and students $10; children 5 and under are free.) A series of opening events will culiminate in 60 hours of round-the-clock free public access over Memorial Day weekend, May 26 to May 28. "The general admission prices and the membership benefits are in line with our sister institutions," said Andrew Stewart, a Barnes spokesman.
NEWS
March 26, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The state attorney general and the Barnes Foundation have asked Montgomery County Orphans' Court to dismiss the eleventh-hour legal effort to block the relocation of the foundation's renowned art collection from Merion to Philadelphia. The latest turn in the lengthy legal proceedings over the Barnes and its trove of Cezannes, Renoirs, Matisses, and other masters came after opponents of the move filed a court petition last month to reopen the case. In that petition, the Friends of the Barnes asked Judge Stanley R. Ott, who has presided over the case since 2002, to take another look, based largely on quotes from the 2009 documentary movie The Art of the Steal . The Barnes and the attorney general argue in their responses that there is nothing new in the opponents' legal briefs or the movie, and that the Friends of the Barnes and its members cannot intervene in the case anyway because they have no legal standing.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Once the hoopla of its grand opening has subsided in May, the Barnes Foundation will be open six days a week, Wednesday through Monday, from 9:30 in the morning until 6 at night. Single adults will shell out $18 for a ticket to enter the new gallery, opening officially to the general public May 19 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. A series of opening events will culiminate in 60 hours of round-the-clock free public access over Memorial Day weekend, May 26 to May 28. After that the new pricing structure kicks in. "The general admission prices and the membership benefits are in line with our sister institutions," said Andrew Stewart, a Barnes spokesman.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Barnes Foundation announced today that it has surpassed the $200 million fund-raising target for construction of its new facility on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia. The foundation, which has struggled financially in its longtime location in Merion, also reported that it has seen rapid growth in museum membership - from 400 members two years ago to over 10,000 now. "Surpassing our initial fund-raising mark and attracting thousands of members clearly demonstrate enthusiasm for the Barnes Foundation's compelling vision of access and openness," said Bernard C. Watson, chairman of the foundation's board of trustees, in a statement.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joanna McQuail Reed, 85, whose four-acre garden near Malvern attracted visitors from all over the world, died Monday of congestive heart failure at Phoenixville Hospital in Chester County. Mrs. Reed, who until about a year ago could be found working in her garden at almost any time of the day, gardened for more than 60 years at Longview Farm, creating what many considered a living work of art. Garden and gardener were featured in about 100 articles in magazines and newspapers over the years, said her daughters Jane Lennon and Susie Novoa, as well as in six or seven books.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2004 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the fate of one of the world's greatest private art collections in his hands, Montgomery County Orphans' Court Judge Stanley Ott will issue a decision this morning on the Barnes Foundation's proposal to move its gallery from its garden setting in Lower Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Center City. The judge's office said yesterday that he would meet privately with attorneys in the case at 11 a.m. today. After that, the opinion will be made public. Harvey Wank, one of three Barnes art students who contested the foundation's proposal in court, learned yesterday while on his way to class at the foundation that the decision would come down today.
NEWS
May 3, 2004 | By Robert Zaller
Moving the Barnes Foundation collection to Center City is the worst idea anyone in Philadelphia has had since the decision to bomb MOVE. The Barnes estate in Lower Merion is, as Albert Barnes designed it to be, the ideal site for his unrivaled trove of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterworks. The next-worst idea about the Barnes is stripping it of its assets, chief among them the Ker-Feal estate in West Pikeland Township, Chester County, to prop up its profligate administration.
NEWS
November 26, 2003
How much control should the Pew Charitable Trusts exert over the Barnes Foundation if its famed art collection moves to Philadelphia? The question is important, timely and very sensitive. The move would, on balance, be good for the Barnes collection, despite the understandable qualms of many who love the foundation as it is. It would be great for Philadelphia, where the collection would become part of a world-class art constellation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Pew and its leader, Rebecca Rimel, are prime movers in this proposed resolution to the Barnes' long battle against bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
EVERY ART LOVER and his mother-in-law's brother's third cousin will be at the Barnes Foundation this weekend looking to get in on its first free fete. But, um, you guys know the art isn't going to disappear in an Impressionist-style puff of smoke, right? So be a rebel and skip the crowds this weekend in favor of some other Barnes-related activities. Themed museums Our big cultural institutions — a club the Barnes is now a member of — get all the attention, but what about the little guys?
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