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NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By JUDY SHEPPS BATTLE
IT IS NO SECRET that President Bush thinks teens should abstain from having sex. He is submitting a budget to Congress that will award $135 million to "abstinence only" sex-education programs, an incentive for schools to bar discussion of birth control in health-education classes. It is also no secret that many high school students are sexually active. The numbers increase with each high school year (39 percent of ninth-graders have had intercourse, and that rises to 65 percent of 12th-graders)
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
By the time he's a high school freshman, Brian Tomasette may have forgotten all the field trips he took as a student at Indian Mills Memorial School. All but two. "I was kind of of scared when I got off the bus because I couldn't get away from this kid who was yelling at me," he said. "This kid and his friends kept yelling at us because they wanted us to know what it was really like where they lived. They guaranteed we wouldn't smile all day, and they were right. " The place was the youth detention center in Jamesburg, where Tomasette and his classmates, sixth graders at the Shamong Middle School, had traveled last month for a visit that was the first of two field trips designed to make middle school students aware of the consequences of drug and alcohol use. They got an earful from some of the residents of the detention center.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa., has lifted a temporary ban on student consumption of alcohol on campus, after a vote by faculty members Monday night. Professors had imposed the ban last month in response to the death of freshman Steven C. Butterworth, 18, who suffered fatal head injuries when he fell from the third story of a campus fraternity house. It was later determined his blood alcohol level exceeded the legal limit for driving. Elizabeth Skewes, college spokeswoman, said faculty members voted to lift the campus-wide alcohol ban after an administration investigation.
SPORTS
May 1, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
A urine sample submitted by Irish swimmer Michelle Smith contained deadly levels of alcohol, the head of the International Olympic Committee medical commission said yesterday. "The alcohol level was so high that you could not survive with that concentration," said Prince Alexandre de Merode, chairman of the medical commission. "That is strange - that normally indicates manipulation. " Smith, who won three gold medals at the Atlanta Olympics but was dogged by suspicions that she had used performance-enhancing drugs, is under investigation by FINA, the world swimming governing body, over the alleged tampering.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty percent of Delaware County 12th graders binged on alcohol within the last month, according to a youth survey by Holcomb Behavorial Health Systems to be released next week. More county teenagers drive under the influence of marijuana than alcohol, according to the county-funded survey, done as part of the Pennsylvania Youth Survey, a project of the state Commission on Crime and Delinquency. The county data will be presented at a town-hall meeting from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. next Thursday at the Delaware County Intermediate Unit, 200 Yale Ave., Morton.
SPORTS
September 12, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Forward Vin Baker of the Boston Celtics says that he is a recovering alcoholic who used to binge in hotel rooms and at home after playing poorly. In an interview in yesterday's Boston Globe, Baker said Celtics coach Jim O'Brien smelled alcohol on his breath in practice and confronted him about it. The team suspended him Feb. 27, and he did not play again last season. He said that he has not had a drink for six months. Baker said that he began binge drinking during the 1998-99 NBA lockout.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | By Bryon MacWilliams, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Observing that decades of familial alcoholism was a "co-conspirator" in the case, a Burlington County judge sentenced a Bordentown City man to seven years in prison for last year's stabbing death of his younger brother. Superior Court Judge Donald P. Gaydos gave defendant James "Bo" Foster, 32, his sympathy during Friday's sentencing, and said he did not believe that Foster meant to kill his brother, John Wayne Foster, 22, when he plunged a butcher knife into his back after the younger brother struck their mother in a dispute over coming home drunk.
SPORTS
August 18, 2011 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
PENN STATE is without punter Anthony Fera, who has not been practicing due to his second alcohol-related incident. Fera, 20, a redshirt sophomore from Cypress, Texas, pleaded guilty on Aug. 4, to two summary offenses, according to court documents. He was charged with purchasing alcohol by a minor and disorderly conduct/fighting. Fera paid more than $650 in fines for the June 7 incident. In 2010, he was cited for purchase/possession of alcohol by a minor. That charge was dismissed.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
Drug and alcohol use among 11th graders in the Octorara Area School District has declined since 1986, but alcohol remains "the drug of choice" among students, according to a district survey released last week. The questionnaire of 160 high school juniors, given each year between 1986 and 1989, found that students drinking liquor monthly or more often had fallen from 45 percent to 32 percent. It also found similar decreases in the consumption of beer and wine. The survey also found that only 2 percent of the students used cocaine monthly or more often - down from 7 percent in 1986.
NEWS
November 27, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The state Superior Court has handed cops a sobering decision. Drunken driving convictions will be overturned if police continue to use a specialized eye test on suspects, the court said. Because the horizontal gaze nystagmus test has not been fully accepted in the scientific or medical communities, its use at the Chester County trial of Gary D. Moore last year was prejudicial, the ruling said. The test is designed to detect an involuntary jerking of the eyes. It is supposed to provide a rough approximation of blood alcohol content.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
It's a custom among some Philadelphians to spend New Year's Day covered in sequins, walking along Broad Street, drinking beer and dancing. Others adhere to an alternative tradition, best practiced in private, involving abundant groaning and clutching of the head and the toilet tank. That is, of course, the New Year's hangover. How best to treat this annual affliction is a matter of some debate. So we turned to the pros - local chefs, who tend to put in late hours and, perhaps, partake in the occasional, end-of-the-night-shift drink.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015
DEAR ABBY: My 7-year-old daughter, "Rosie," recently came home in tears because a classmate, "Emily," told her I was a liar and she was an idiot for believing my lies. Then Rosie asked me if I had been the one putting money under her pillow and presents under the tree all along. Ultimately, I told her that, yes, I had. But I stressed how important it was that she not ruin other kids' belief in the tooth fairy, etc. The cat is out of the bag for my child, but do you think I should mention this to Emily's mother?
SPORTS
December 14, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since America's response to its grotesque gun violence is more guns, it's hardly surprising that in the face of a campus binge-drinking epidemic, more colleges have decided to sell alcohol at sporting events. Having already ceded authority over their athletic programs to boosters, shoe companies, and TV networks, university presidents have more recently been busy surrendering to powerful brewers. "One of the main issues confronting universities is alcohol abuse," West Virginia University president Gordon Gee said earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2015
CANDIED YAMS. Sausage stuffing, dripping with mom's homemade gravy. Good ol' sweet-potato pie. These Thanksgiving favorites taste sinfully delicious, no doubt. And I am the last person to tell you to deprive yourself. But you've worked hard for that physique, and you don't want to blow your waistline on a big meal, right? Here are some strategies to get you through Thanksgiving Day without feeling like a stuffed turkey. 1. Don't starve yourself before the big meal.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2015
Charlie Mooney had his white notebook binder with him, complete with a revenue analysis chart. Mooney is not a high-flying CEO, or a bean counter from Wall Street. He is director of retail operations at the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, which runs the 604 Fine Wine and Good Spirits stores in the state. State stores have long been despised for limited selection, high prices, and poor service. But Mooney uses such terms as "rebranding" and "consumer-friendly" in describing the state's effort since 2010 to revamp the stores to boost sales and fend off privatization, which continues to be a goal of the GOP-run legislature.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
For vintage Pennsylvania liquor law lunacy, 2015 has been a very good year. Whether the Malvern attorney and oenophile Arthur Goldman amassed his vast wine collection for fun, profit, or both, his now-infamous illicit cellar was a direct consequence of the Prohibition-era laws that compel citizens to settle for the State Stores' stunted selection - or else. Now the bureaucracy born of those laws is leading as inexorably as ever to another absurd result: the pointless destruction of more than a thousand bottles of fine wine.
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THOMAS EWING was stabbed 11 times - seven in the chest. His alleged assailant, Angelo "Angel" Maldonado, 40, who was a regular at Owen's Cafe, a neighborhood bar in Mayfair, was held for trial yesterday by Municipal Judge Patrick Dugan on charges including first-degree murder and possession of an instrument of crime. At Maldonado's preliminary hearing, Ewing's best friend and a police detective testified. The evidence so far suggests that Maldonado, of Claridge Street near Luzerne in Juniata Park, may have stabbed Ewing, 21, of Northeast Philly, because he thought Ewing and others had robbed the bar. Whether that was the real motivation behind the chasing and stabbing of Ewing that night may not be known until Maldonado's trial.
FOOD
July 31, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
It's the food you've shunned that has the greatest potential to surprise. Take this summer when I made, on a whim, Dorie Greenspan's citrus berry terrine for a family gathering. Despite the fancy name, it was a straight-up gelatin mold, flavored simply with orange juice, though the jewellike flashes of segmented fruit in every slice made it look fancy and complicated. If I'd told my guests in advance what I would be serving, they might have scoffed, flashing back to pretzel and mandarin-orange studded rings of yesteryear, but their reaction to this fresh-tasting dessert was pure delight.
SPORTS
July 16, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SO NOW we're told Donovan McNabb's blood-alcohol level was twice the legal limit when he was arrested in Gilbert, Ariz., last month. This means the former Bird could become a jailbird. McNabb was involved in a non-injury collision with another vehicle on June 28. Yesterday, police said his blood-alcohol level was 0.17. The legal limit is .08. It was the second DUI arrest in Arizona for McNabb, who spent a day in jail in April 2014 for a misdemeanor DUI offense near Phoenix in December 2013.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The powder looks harmless enough. But when added to water, the packet of Palcohol creates an adult beverage with the same alcohol content of a standard mixed drink. It can also be snorted, creating a choking hazard, or abused, by adding too much powder or mixing it with drugs for a dangerous high, state lawmakers said. Legislation that would prohibit the sale, delivery, or purchase of powdered alcohol is awaiting Gov. Christie's signature following overwhelming approval Monday by the Senate and Thursday by the Assembly.
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