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Alexander Calder

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1998 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
If your angle is right and the sky is clear, you can stand on the stairs inside the rotunda of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and see the grand works of three generations of a Philadelphia art dynasty. Off in the distance, City Hall looms, the sculptures that adorn it mightily designed by Alexander Milne Calder. A little closer is Logan Square Fountain, its stately statues done by Calder's son, Alexander. And up in that Art Museum rotunda hangs what we all now know is a mobile, this one done by that most prolific and whimsical sculptor of the mid-20th century, Alexander Calder, the son and grandson of those far-from-whimsical artists whose work appears up the Ben Franklin Parkway.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maker Brad Litwin, 59, makes kinetic sculptures in his East Oak Lane studio, including a line he calls MechaniCards - intricately laser-cut paper made into tiny, greeting-generating machines. They're sold online, at MechaniCards.com, and at museum stores, including those of the Princeton Art Museum and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His start Litwin can't really pinpoint it: He's worked as an engineer, animator, musician, and artist. "In 2010, I was sitting in my studio and looking at some boxes I had on the shelf, CD mailers actually . . .. I was thinking it'd be neat to have a machine inside one of those.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lisa Maxine Reisman Halterman, 57, of Rittenhouse Square, owner of an eclectic gallery who was a patron of the arts, died at home Wednesday, June 6, of breast cancer. In 2005, after careers as a real estate agent and college administrator, Ms. Halterman pursued her love of art and opened Lisa M. Reisman et Cie off Rittenhouse Square. The gallery displayed original paintings, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, Baccarat crystal, handmade items for babies, old posters, and art nouveau and art deco soap and perfume labels she had collected over 20 years.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | By Thomas Hine, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The immense 40,000-square-foot metal-and-glass sculpture that's suspended from the ceiling of the Pennsylvania Convention Center's grand hall isn't a Virgo after all. And despite what it says in the center's art brochure, it isn't Untitled, either. When the work, by New York artist Judy Pfaff, is dedicated today as part of a celebration of the completion of the center's ambitious art program, it will be called cirque Cirque. The title refers to the two steel-and-aluminum rings, one of them 130 feet in diameter, that are the sculpture's largest elements.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leon Sitarchuk, a sculptor and artist praised for the power, grace and craftmanship of his works and loved by four decades of students, died Saturday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. He was 71 and had lived in North Wales. Mr. Sitarchuk, the son of Ukrainian immigrants, was born in Philadelphia. Throughout his life, he gave numerous one-man shows at galleries and art institutions in the city. His works of abstract, welded steel can be found in private collections, including the Sun Oil world headquarters and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and at outdoor locations, including South Street.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As part of the 127-year-old museum's fund-raising efforts, it's hosting "Treasures," a four-day baublefest starting Thursday that features a private reception, talks with jewelry historians, and fall fashion advice from local stylists. In addition, 26 jewelry designers will be selling handmade, one-of-a-kind accessories to shoppers with a sweet spot for frippery.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you summarize 50 years of performance in 105 minutes? Pennsylvania Ballet, celebrating its half-century this year, did it Thursday night with a mini-tour of its repertory as it opened a four-day run at the Merriam Theater. The program began with "Serenade," one of the company's signature ballets. Founder Barbara Weisberger was a child in 1935 when she sat under a piano at the newly formed School of American Ballet and watched George Balanchine create it. The choreographer later gave "Serenade," along with a number of his other masterpieces, to Weisberger to get her young troupe on its feet.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia knows its families of artists, families in which the spark of creative vision is passed from one generation to the next and ignites in each. Just stand in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, beneath Alexander Calder's white mobile, Ghost , look down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to Swann Fountain's sculptural figures by Alexander Sterling Calder, and on to City Hall's tower, where Alexander Milne Calder's William Penn presides. Son, father, grandfather - three generations of artists defining one city boulevard.
REAL_ESTATE
October 27, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
To display their art collection properly, Rob and Debbie Cohen renovated their condominium at the Residences at the Ritz-Carlton in Center City with an eye to outfitting the space as a personal gallery with specially designed lighting. With the help of Mary MacElree Interior Design of Haverford and supplier Rittenhouse Electric, the Cohens transformed their apartment into a true haven for their paintings, sculpture and family portraits. Last year, Debbie Cohen, formerly a partner with law firm Pepper Hamilton, and Rob Cohen, who owns and operates the Frog Hollow Racquet Club in Lansdale, moved out of the Philadelphia suburbs and into the city.
NEWS
March 18, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
In the heady days of the '60s, '70s and '80s, corporations bought and developed art collections to line their wood-paneled offices and hallways. Having the works of Picasso or Frank W. Benson on the wall impressed clients and conveyed a message to employees: We're a company of quality and taste. But in the '90s, as corporations lay off thousands and close dozens of offices, that same art - often worth millions - is being donated, sold or auctioned. Having art, for some, "went from being an asset to being a liability," said Heather Gibson of ArtSouth, an art management consultant firm based in Manayunk.
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NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maker Brad Litwin, 59, makes kinetic sculptures in his East Oak Lane studio, including a line he calls MechaniCards - intricately laser-cut paper made into tiny, greeting-generating machines. They're sold online, at MechaniCards.com, and at museum stores, including those of the Princeton Art Museum and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His start Litwin can't really pinpoint it: He's worked as an engineer, animator, musician, and artist. "In 2010, I was sitting in my studio and looking at some boxes I had on the shelf, CD mailers actually . . .. I was thinking it'd be neat to have a machine inside one of those.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As part of the 127-year-old museum's fund-raising efforts, it's hosting "Treasures," a four-day baublefest starting Thursday that features a private reception, talks with jewelry historians, and fall fashion advice from local stylists. In addition, 26 jewelry designers will be selling handmade, one-of-a-kind accessories to shoppers with a sweet spot for frippery.
REAL_ESTATE
October 27, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
To display their art collection properly, Rob and Debbie Cohen renovated their condominium at the Residences at the Ritz-Carlton in Center City with an eye to outfitting the space as a personal gallery with specially designed lighting. With the help of Mary MacElree Interior Design of Haverford and supplier Rittenhouse Electric, the Cohens transformed their apartment into a true haven for their paintings, sculpture and family portraits. Last year, Debbie Cohen, formerly a partner with law firm Pepper Hamilton, and Rob Cohen, who owns and operates the Frog Hollow Racquet Club in Lansdale, moved out of the Philadelphia suburbs and into the city.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia knows its families of artists, families in which the spark of creative vision is passed from one generation to the next and ignites in each. Just stand in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, beneath Alexander Calder's white mobile, Ghost , look down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to Swann Fountain's sculptural figures by Alexander Sterling Calder, and on to City Hall's tower, where Alexander Milne Calder's William Penn presides. Son, father, grandfather - three generations of artists defining one city boulevard.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you summarize 50 years of performance in 105 minutes? Pennsylvania Ballet, celebrating its half-century this year, did it Thursday night with a mini-tour of its repertory as it opened a four-day run at the Merriam Theater. The program began with "Serenade," one of the company's signature ballets. Founder Barbara Weisberger was a child in 1935 when she sat under a piano at the newly formed School of American Ballet and watched George Balanchine create it. The choreographer later gave "Serenade," along with a number of his other masterpieces, to Weisberger to get her young troupe on its feet.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lisa Maxine Reisman Halterman, 57, of Rittenhouse Square, owner of an eclectic gallery who was a patron of the arts, died at home Wednesday, June 6, of breast cancer. In 2005, after careers as a real estate agent and college administrator, Ms. Halterman pursued her love of art and opened Lisa M. Reisman et Cie off Rittenhouse Square. The gallery displayed original paintings, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, Baccarat crystal, handmade items for babies, old posters, and art nouveau and art deco soap and perfume labels she had collected over 20 years.
LIVING
May 7, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Three art sales next weekend will offer works by major 20th-century figures - a quintessential example of an Alexander Calder mobile, an untitled oil-on-canvas by Vasudeo S. Gaitonde, and a bronze cast by an artist not usually identified with sculpture, Thomas Eakins. The Calder mobile is among 180 lots of modern and contemporary works of art that will be offered by Freeman's beginning at 2 p.m. May 16 at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. Titled Azul, Amarillo, Blanco, Sobre Rojo and one of three Calders in the sale, it is expected to bring $100,000 to $150,000, according to presale estimates in the $35 catalog, accessible online at www.freemansauction.
NEWS
January 12, 2009 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
For more than two decades, they've been out of public view, feared lost, feared destroyed, feared - at the least - grotesquely faded or damaged. But from a cluster of nondescript plastic tubs stuck in an out-of-the-way storage room in the bowels of a Center City office tower, they were ferreted out at last, still bright and essentially unmarred. And now, for the first time since the mid-1980s, the vanished Alexander Calder banners - part of one of the greatest public art legacies in Philadelphia history - will be on public view until March at the Central Branch of the Free Library on Logan Square.
NEWS
August 3, 2008 | By Steven Siegel
Art may be at its greatest when it is still simple and raw. Then we often glimpse greatness to come; then we often see the artist most clearly. Alexander Calder, the Philadelphia sculptor whose 110th birth anniversary is this year, is a case in point. Like many famous artists, he had all the technical and financial resources a sculptor could hope for, and he used them in the production of his large mobiles and stabiles. But he also sat at his bench, and over a lifetime produced a prodigious body of one-of-a-kind, hand-crafted jewelry, and countless other small works.
NEWS
September 14, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
There won't be an Alexander Calder museum on the Parkway after all. After a year of waiting for negotiations between the Calder Foundation of New York and the city over loans of art, financing and related concerns to be resolved, Gov. Rendell has withdrawn the offer of $15 million in state capital money to help fund the project. The deal-breaker appears to have been the reluctance of Calder family members to commit loans of art for extended periods. Without agreement on this key issue, private fund-raising to match Rendell's offer - a condition for receiving state money - stalled.
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