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Alexi Lalas

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SPORTS
July 5, 1994 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexi Lalas, who seemed to be a gimmick when this World Cup started - a rock 'n' roller playing soccer - left the field yesterday as probably the biggest American star. As long as the United States was in the World Cup, there was no way around the gigantic redhaired defender with the raging goatee. Yesterday, Brazil would slink the ball toward the United States goal only to find Lalas heading the ball or tangling up one of the superstar scorers or just getting a toe on the ball.
NEWS
June 13, 1993
U.S. SOCCER COMES OF AGE Only a year and a half ago, Alexi Lalas was playing soccer for Rutgers against Textile and Temple. But last Wednesday night, the tall red-haired sweeper helped make soccer history when he scored the second goal in the United States' 2-0 victory over England - the country where the modern game was born. The story was buried in sports sections here, but in humiliated England, it was a front-page sensation. The victory also marked a milestone in American sport because it was no fluke.
SPORTS
May 10, 1994 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The long curls of strawberry blond hair are kept in a plastic bag under the bathroom sink. Alexi Lalas had them cut off so he could make the U.S. national soccer team in 1991, but the shorn locks are neither forgotten nor gone. Lalas, a modestly talented defender whose hard work has made him a favorite of U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic, needs reminders these days. So, the hair stays. Even as the U.S. team prepares for the World Cup, the ultimate stage for any soccer player, Lalas chooses to recall that seven years ago he was a modestly talented high school player without a college recruiter dialing his number.
NEWS
June 13, 1998
All right, class, let's repeat our word for the day: GOLLLLLLLLLLLL! That wasn't so hard, was it? Let's try again: GOLLLLLLLLLLLL! It's the word gol, Spanish for goal. And it's what Andreas Cantor, soccer commentator for Univision, bellows when a soccer ball finds its way into the net. It's World Cup time. In the next month, the best soccer team in the world will be crowned. America may find soccer boring, incomprehensible, irrelevant - but who's asking America? The rest of the world has begun a month of lunatic worship in which the altar is a playing field and the acolytes wear cleats.
SPORTS
September 8, 1997 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a day marked by dramatic upheaval on the field, the U.S. soccer team played one of its most stable and satisfying matches in recent memory. Alexi Lalas, the most recognizable face in American soccer, was benched for the first time in years. Eric Wynalda, the team's star striker, decided 10 minutes before the game that an injury would prevent him from playing. Two previously dismissed players, Roy Wegerle and Preki Radosavljevic, returned to the national team after a sustained absence to perhaps punch their own tickets for the 1998 World Cup. And Tab Ramos, a scrapping midfielder whose attitude can ignite this team, finished his comeback from knee surgery with a laser shot in the 78th minute that gave the United States a 1-0 win over Costa Rica in a vital World Cup qualifying match.
SPORTS
June 26, 1998 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At halftime of last night's final World Cup match for the United States, when even a reprieve from the eventual 1-0 loss to Yugoslavia would not have diminished the overall disappointment, five veterans gathered on the field for a poignant group picture. Alexi Lalas, Tab Ramos, Eric Wynalda, Marcelo Balboa and Jeff Agoos threw arms around each other's shoulders and produced wry, ironic grins for the photographer. "I wanted at least one picture of me on the field," Lalas said later.
SPORTS
June 22, 1994 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Writer
The thing about being an emerging soccer nation is that, with no tradition to lean back on, each succeeding game takes on more significance. Tonight in the World Cup, the U.S. national soccer team will play the latest biggest game in its history when it takes on Colombia in front of an expected sellout crowd of more than 92,000 at the Rose Bowl. ESPN is televising the game beginning at 7:25 p.m. "Every time we do something well, I think we're just climbing up the ladder and setting another precedent for soccer in the United States," U.S. defender Cle Kooiman said.
SPORTS
October 24, 1993 | By Gene Morris, FOR THE INQUIRER
With his Mitch Williams-like hair flapping almost as wildly as his gangly, 6-foot, 3-inch frame, red-headed Alexi Lalas was the most noticeable player yesterday for the U.S. national soccer team. He was also the most notable, as he consistently rushed up from his defensive position to join the offensive play. Lalas nearly scored three times, but the United States came up short, falling to Ukraine, 1-0, before 7,896 at Lehigh University's Goodman Stadium. The game was the U.S. team's latest in its quest to prepare for the World Cup next summer (the team must pare its roster to 22 players)
SPORTS
June 25, 1994 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If soccer is truly a game in which style can be as pleasing as substance, the best moment for the U.S. team in its win over Colombia came when defender Marcelo Balboa launched a spectacular bicycle kick shot at the goal. Balboa, part of the lanky central defense unit, redirected a long crossing pass just wide of the right post, missing soccer immortality by the width of a ball. "I love Pele, but Marcelo would have replaced Pele as far as bicycle kicks go," said goalkeeper Tony Meola.
SPORTS
November 20, 1991 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alexi Lalas is lead guitarist and vocalist for a band that often plays the top dives in New York's Greenwich Village. "He's a rocker," the band's drummer said in praise. But this fellow with a mop of tangled red hair is also a sweeper, possibly the top college soccer player in the nation. A starting defender for the United States Olympic team, Lalas captains the Rutgers soccer team, which is 19-2-1 and was ranked No. 1 in the country for a stretch earlier this year. The Scarlet Knights reached the championship game of the NCAA tournament last year before losing to UCLA, and are now ranked fourth in the nation.
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SPORTS
July 3, 2014 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
CHILE'S GONZALO JARA took the slow, long 45-yard walk from the midfield line on the pitch to the penalty area all alone on Saturday. Thousands of Brazilians screamed for him to fail. The hopes of his team, and his country, rested on his right foot. When his shot on Julio Cesar sailed just a few inches more than he would have liked and bounced off the right post, the stadium erupted with joy, and Chile's World Cup dreams were broken. Last weekend highlighted the first games of the Round of 16 in the 2014 FIFA World Cup, which featured two games decided by penalty kicks.
SPORTS
June 25, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
If you're bored at work one day and need a quick distraction, go back and review America's great accomplishments in the World Cup. Don't worry about your boss catching you and complaining that you're slacking off and wasting valuable company time. It won't take long. The (short) list begins with the U.S. side's improbable 1-0 win in 1950 over our former oppressors from England. Though it remains unclear how many people actually celebrated the victory when it happened, it surely was one of the highlights of the year for Americans across our fine land - right up there with the debut of the Peanuts comic strip and not getting turned into a fine powder by a Soviet atomic bomb.
SPORTS
June 26, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
An utter, total wreck of a World Cup for the United States ended yesterday with a 1-0 loss to Yugoslavia in Nantes, France. And then the Americans finally let loose, mostly at their coaches. "I don't think we got the best out of the talent we had here," said veteran Tab Ramos, one of three U.S. players to appear in all three tournaments in the '90s. "From the beginning, this whole World Cup has been a mess. I blame the coaches for the losses. I have no problem saying that. " The Americans, who came to the tournament with the goal of showing Europe that U.S. soccer has come of age, instead proved how far they have to go. The United States (0-3)
SPORTS
June 26, 1998 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At halftime of last night's final World Cup match for the United States, when even a reprieve from the eventual 1-0 loss to Yugoslavia would not have diminished the overall disappointment, five veterans gathered on the field for a poignant group picture. Alexi Lalas, Tab Ramos, Eric Wynalda, Marcelo Balboa and Jeff Agoos threw arms around each other's shoulders and produced wry, ironic grins for the photographer. "I wanted at least one picture of me on the field," Lalas said later.
NEWS
June 13, 1998
All right, class, let's repeat our word for the day: GOLLLLLLLLLLLL! That wasn't so hard, was it? Let's try again: GOLLLLLLLLLLLL! It's the word gol, Spanish for goal. And it's what Andreas Cantor, soccer commentator for Univision, bellows when a soccer ball finds its way into the net. It's World Cup time. In the next month, the best soccer team in the world will be crowned. America may find soccer boring, incomprehensible, irrelevant - but who's asking America? The rest of the world has begun a month of lunatic worship in which the altar is a playing field and the acolytes wear cleats.
SPORTS
September 8, 1997 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a day marked by dramatic upheaval on the field, the U.S. soccer team played one of its most stable and satisfying matches in recent memory. Alexi Lalas, the most recognizable face in American soccer, was benched for the first time in years. Eric Wynalda, the team's star striker, decided 10 minutes before the game that an injury would prevent him from playing. Two previously dismissed players, Roy Wegerle and Preki Radosavljevic, returned to the national team after a sustained absence to perhaps punch their own tickets for the 1998 World Cup. And Tab Ramos, a scrapping midfielder whose attitude can ignite this team, finished his comeback from knee surgery with a laser shot in the 78th minute that gave the United States a 1-0 win over Costa Rica in a vital World Cup qualifying match.
SPORTS
June 12, 1995 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Alexi Lalas and the other members of the U.S. national soccer team, long, strange trips are nothing new. They traveled the distance between virtual anonymity and sudden stardom in the heady days leading up to the 1994 World Cup. And their divergent paths since that tournament have been testament to the rewarding but also fickle nature of fame. Lalas, who played the second half of yesterday's 3-2 win over Nigeria in the opener of the U.S. Cup, has probably enjoyed the benefits of the World Cup more than anyone else.
SPORTS
July 5, 1994 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexi Lalas, who seemed to be a gimmick when this World Cup started - a rock 'n' roller playing soccer - left the field yesterday as probably the biggest American star. As long as the United States was in the World Cup, there was no way around the gigantic redhaired defender with the raging goatee. Yesterday, Brazil would slink the ball toward the United States goal only to find Lalas heading the ball or tangling up one of the superstar scorers or just getting a toe on the ball.
SPORTS
June 25, 1994 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If soccer is truly a game in which style can be as pleasing as substance, the best moment for the U.S. team in its win over Colombia came when defender Marcelo Balboa launched a spectacular bicycle kick shot at the goal. Balboa, part of the lanky central defense unit, redirected a long crossing pass just wide of the right post, missing soccer immortality by the width of a ball. "I love Pele, but Marcelo would have replaced Pele as far as bicycle kicks go," said goalkeeper Tony Meola.
SPORTS
June 22, 1994 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Writer
The thing about being an emerging soccer nation is that, with no tradition to lean back on, each succeeding game takes on more significance. Tonight in the World Cup, the U.S. national soccer team will play the latest biggest game in its history when it takes on Colombia in front of an expected sellout crowd of more than 92,000 at the Rose Bowl. ESPN is televising the game beginning at 7:25 p.m. "Every time we do something well, I think we're just climbing up the ladder and setting another precedent for soccer in the United States," U.S. defender Cle Kooiman said.
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