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Alf

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
A Saturday morning cartoon version of "ALF," the weekly NBC comedy series that stars a furry little extraterrestrial from a planet called Melmac, will debut next fall on the peacock network. In the animated edition of ALF (whose name stands for Alien Life Form), viewers will see the smart-mouthed, ill-mannered alien as he makes his way to Earth after his planet explodes. A TIMELY RERUN With current front-page stories dancing in their heads, NBC programmers have decided to rerun "Secrets of the Red Bedroom," a spy yarn about a Soviet vamp who seduces, then blackmails, American officials and industrialists.
NEWS
September 22, 1986 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two comedy series premiere tonight as network television officially begins its 40th fall season. If you're hungry for novelty, you can easily watch both and still have plenty of time to sleep off the experience. ALF, sort of a science-fiction sitcom, will premiere at 8 p.m. on NBC (Channel 3). Together We Stand, a family situation comedy from the creator of Gilligan's Island and The Brady Bunch, will try to win your sentimental heart at 8:30 p.m. on CBS (Channel 10). After the prime-time period of 8 to 11 p.m. has run its course this evening, the three commercial networks will have introduced more than half (13 out of 23)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Although he burps at the kitchen table, clips his toenails in the living room, and regularly insults his hosts, NBC likes him so much he's been given the nod for a full season (22 episodes) run. His name is ALF, which stands for Alien Life Form, and he's a muppet-like creature who finds refuge with a middle-class family after he crash-lands on Earth. He becomes as much a part of the family as an extraterrestrial can. What makes ALF so appealing? Series co-creator Tom Patchett says it's not only the creature's looks, but also his ready wit. "ALF is funny in the same way that Rocky and Bullwinkle were," Patchett said.
LIVING
November 6, 1988 | By David Walstad, Special to The Inquirer
Alf star Max Wright is in his third NBC series of the 1980s. "I only work at this network," he says. "Brandon Tartikoff is a fan of mine. " It can't hurt to have such fans as Tartikoff, the NBC Entertainment president, but Wright, 46, has a wide range of acting experience, too. "I'm like the William Demarest of 1988," he says, referring to the crusty character actor who played Uncle Charley on My Three Sons. ALF turned out to be a case of the third time being the charm. The series, which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. on Channel 3, ranks regularly in the Nielsen Top Ten, while Wright's earlier series, the critically acclaimed Buffalo Bill and the forgettable Misfits of Science, were ratings duds.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Alf - the dog, not the television character - saved the Pineview Care Center in Sewell from a major robbery, but Arthur Frisch saved Alf. Frisch, 29, of Cherry Hill, is the administrator at the center and responsible for the residents, the facility and Alf. So when he discovered that Alf was loose from his run outside the activities room Feb. 16, Frisch wondered what was going on. The run gives Alf access to the room, so the dog only could...
SPORTS
November 5, 1992 | By Arlene J. Newman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Terry Rudd of Berwyn easily cleared a 6-foot-8 wall to win the Puissance Class competition at the National Horse Show last night. Rudd described the jump as "effortless" for her mount, Alf, a 10-year-old Hanoverian stallion owned by Paul Gansky of Newtown Square. "I thought he could have gone higher," Rudd said of Alf. "He landed easily and had no problems. " Alf was the only horse in a field of 11 to clear the wall at 6-8. Rudd said that last night was only the second time Alf had been in a high- jumping competition.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | By Paddy Noyes, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
As Evette steps into the Adoption Center, she announces that she has lost her green hair ribbon. Alf, her brother, nods in sympathy, because they're going to have their picture taken, and if they're going to look nice, Evette needs her ribbon. So Evette backtracks - into both elevators (even though she had ridden in only one), to the restaurant (where she had a snack), and then back to the office. No luck. A ribbon of another color is found for her in a desk drawer. And she and Alf beam, satisfied, as she admires herself in a compact mirror.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
Two of NBC's new fall series were showcased in back-to-back news conferences here yesterday, and the difference in style, and substance, was nothing short of astounding. One series is L.A. Law, the new co-creation of Steven Bochco, formerly of Hill Street Blues. It's adult and thoughtful and, unless ABC comes up with a quality "sleeper," which seems unlikely, is easily the best new offering among this year's fall crop. The other series is Alf, about an "Alien Life Form" who visits Earth and decides to stay.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | By Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Kathy Brennan contributed to this report
The office of a University of Pennsylvania professor who has frequently defended laboratory experimentation on animals was vandalized over the weekend, according to university security officials. A national underground group called the Animal Liberation Front said it stole files, videotapes, slides and computer discs on Saturday night from the office of Professor Adrian Morrison, head of the anatomy laboratory at Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine. The ALF said it singled out Morrison for his defense of two animal experimenters it deems appalling.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
Adriana Falcon Trafford, whose job at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving is deciding whether to give people money or not, was troubled by an application that hit her desk earlier this year. It was from a local organization that built low-cost housing. It was asking for $50,000 to purchase a right of way from the local electric utility. The foundation had the money for a worthwhile purpose such as this. That wasn't the trouble. It just seemed to Trafford, as she studied the application, that the electric company was asking for too much money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alf Ake Winte, 83, a lifelong pastry chef who emigrated from Sweden and later owned a pastry shop in Havertown, died Friday, Oct. 18, at his home in Newtown Square from a stroke brought on by heart disease complications. Mr. Winte honed his culinary skills as an apprentice pastry chef in Stockholm and Sala, which is about 65 miles outside the Swedish capital. By 1951, Mr. Winte and his future wife, Britt Lundvik, had opened their first bakery in Stockholm, Grev Ture. The two married a year later, and in 1955 they came to America, settling in Denver, where one of his sisters was living.
SPORTS
August 5, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
While bracing for the forthcoming blows, it's time to empty out the mailbag . . .   - Garland   Garland, I'll agree that the story has grown tiresome, but I wouldn't say it's a "non-issue. " A man was shot in the parking lot at a birthday party. That's not a normal occurrence. I thought Bob Ford wrote the best line about the entire saga: "If a dog had been shot in the parking lot of the Guadalajara restaurant on June 25, Vick would be out of work again.
REAL_ESTATE
November 1, 2009 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
When David and Carole Alfe bought a six-bedroom Colonial Revival house in Camden County, they knew it needed a lot of work. "It reminded me of working on a battleship," says Carole Alfe, 55, museum-shop manager at the Masonic Library and Museum of Pennsylvania. "At times, we kicked ourselves for buying it," adds husband David Alfe, 54, a therapist. But all the effort has paid off. The house is now their home, and one that stays as close to the period as possible. The Alfes, who married in 2000, decided to move out of their three-bedroom twin in Ardmore because of David's job in New Jersey.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Bucks County flower grower whose property was vandalized last week, allegedly by animal-rights activists, decided yesterday he no longer intends to house monkeys there for scientific research. "We are not withdrawing our application because of the vandalism or destruction of property," Michael Hsu said in an interview. The reason for the withdrawal, he said, is he realized the zoning application he had submitted to Richland Township on April 27, asking for "commercial kennel use," sought more space than the township might allow.
SPORTS
November 5, 1992 | By Arlene J. Newman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Terry Rudd of Berwyn easily cleared a 6-foot-8 wall to win the Puissance Class competition at the National Horse Show last night. Rudd described the jump as "effortless" for her mount, Alf, a 10-year-old Hanoverian stallion owned by Paul Gansky of Newtown Square. "I thought he could have gone higher," Rudd said of Alf. "He landed easily and had no problems. " Alf was the only horse in a field of 11 to clear the wall at 6-8. Rudd said that last night was only the second time Alf had been in a high- jumping competition.
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Running barefoot, Alf Palema - pinned three deep to the rail and virtually unnoticed turning for home - squeezed through on the inside yesterday at the Meadowlands and nipped his favored stablemate, King Conch, for the most cherished prize in harness racing, the Hambletonian. The victory, the first in eight Hambletonian attempts by 43-year-old driver Mickey McNichol, was worth $552,000, the richest payoff in the 67-year history of the famous championship for 3-year-old trotters.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | By Paddy Noyes, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
As Evette steps into the Adoption Center, she announces that she has lost her green hair ribbon. Alf, her brother, nods in sympathy, because they're going to have their picture taken, and if they're going to look nice, Evette needs her ribbon. So Evette backtracks - into both elevators (even though she had ridden in only one), to the restaurant (where she had a snack), and then back to the office. No luck. A ribbon of another color is found for her in a desk drawer. And she and Alf beam, satisfied, as she admires herself in a compact mirror.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | BY DON HARRISON
Michael Landon meant no more to me than Alf Landon, the Kansas governor who was clobbered by FDR in the 1936 presidential election. As Hollywood deaths go, I was much more concerned with Lee Remick's the same week. What class! But was Lee Remick ascending into Heaven on a Daily News front page? No, Michael Landon was - in a publicity still photo from the TV fantasy-drama series, "Highway to Heaven," unearthed from our files by editors Dan Hawkins and Rick Selvin. Yes sir, on Tuesday, July 2, there was Collingswood-born Michael all over our Page 1 . . . and Page 3 . . . and Pages 27, 28 and 29. You had to go inside the paper to read about the new Supreme Court appointee, another hat in the ring for Bill Gray's Congress seat, more on the continuing coverage of Philadelphia's newest cardinal, the never-ending deadlock over Pennsylvania's budget, the arrest of a cop for murder and Yugoslavia's ordeal.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
We'd been driving on superhighways all day, stopping only to stuff our three kids with Big Macs and Chicken McNuggets at a McDonald's along the road, when we spotted the distinctive sign of the chain motel where we'd made reservations for that night. Within minutes of checking in, the kids were bickering over what to watch on the tube - Alf, or a football game on the cable all-sports channel. Sounds like just another road trip in America, right? Wrong. The McDonald's was in Lille, France, just before we crossed into Belgium, and our chain motel was a Novotel in Aachen, Germany.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
Adriana Falcon Trafford, whose job at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving is deciding whether to give people money or not, was troubled by an application that hit her desk earlier this year. It was from a local organization that built low-cost housing. It was asking for $50,000 to purchase a right of way from the local electric utility. The foundation had the money for a worthwhile purpose such as this. That wasn't the trouble. It just seemed to Trafford, as she studied the application, that the electric company was asking for too much money.
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