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Alfa Romeo

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NEWS
August 3, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
For the last 15 years or so, Alfa Romeo has been laboring mightily to achieve mediocrity. Often, the attempts to earn a C didn't work out, as suggested by an assortment of sour citrus that included the Alfetta and the Milano. Recently, the Italian automaker decided to do something about a lemon legend that was beginning to rival its sporting heritage. It set out to build an automobile that exuded quality as well as an exciting image. The result was the 164, which Alfa believes is the most advanced, highest- quality car it has ever built.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
Sergio Pininfarina, 85, whose design firm created the rakish and elegant auto bodies of some of the most popular, and fastest, cars ever made by Ferrari, Alfa Romeo, Maserati, and Fiat, died Tuesday at his home in Turin, Italy. In 1961, Mr. Pininfarina took the reins of the family company from his father, Battista, who founded it under the name Carrozzeria Pinin Farina in 1930 and then rebuilt it virtually from scratch after Allied bombers destroyed its plant along with the rest of Italy's industrial base in World War II. The younger Pininfarina, who brought a flair for marketing as well as design to the family business, scored his first successes in collaboration with Ferrari, the race-car maker known for its lucrative business in rich men's toys.
NEWS
October 3, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The connections between Philadelphia and Italy run deeper than great cuisine, including influences on colonial architecture and politics. Andrea Canepari, Italy's consul general in the city, rightly wants to strengthen them with Ciao Philadelphia, the second annual monthlong celebration of Italo-Philadelphian links. Held through October, this year's festival (ciaophiladelphia.com) is to include tours of Independence Mall and the Union League that highlight Italian contributions to American history.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Frank Lawlor, Special to The Inquirer
As Frank Havnoonian walks around the basement of his Drexel Hill home, each frame and sprocket in his scope inspires a new cycling story. "See this frame? This was my first racing frame. I retired it after 20,000 miles before anything could happen to it. "You know what's neat about a wheel spinning? Because of the motion of the wheel, you can balance it with only one hand. " "They have discovered through computers that a relatively smooth tire tread is better for bicycles than the deep treads that are used for car tires.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Patrons and sponsors of the Harcum Junior College 75th Birthday Ball were feted at the Bryn Mawr home of Sandy and Tom Pew last Thursday evening. The Pews and Arthur and Marilyn Klein chaired the sponsor and patron event, which was attended by more than 50 people. Sandy Pew is a 1972 graduate of the school. Elizabeth Schoch of Haverford and Bernard Guth of Andalusia are general chairmen for the ball, which will take place at 7 p.m. on Nov. 30 at the Merion Cricket Club in Haverford.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
Baldwin-United Corp., operating under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act since 1983, said yesterday that it hoped to emerge from the proceedings next week and operate as PHLCorp Inc., with headquarters in Philadelphia. Baldwin-United has had its headquarters in the IVB Building, 1700 Market St., since the spring, when it moved from Cincinnati. The company has been managed under contract by Palmieri Co., an arrangement that is to continue after it emerges from bankruptcy. The one-time financial-services conglomerate said its new structure would focus on S&H trading stamps, motivation services, travel services and life, health and accident insurance through various subsidiaries.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
A doctor who grew up in Kensington collects what others overlook, displaying his finds in a quirky manner and gaining more notice abroad than at home. Think of Fred Simeone as the Albert Barnes of classic racing cars. On Wednesday, Simeone, 75, of Chestnut Hill, a retired Philadelphia neurosurgeon, will don black tie in London, where his Simeone Foundation Museum is short-listed for an International Historic Motoring Award. A big deal. But there's a good chance you've not visited the Simeone museum, unless you happened to be driving among the gentleman's clubs and rental-car lots in the wastelands off Essington Avenue and followed the placards pointing to the "race car museum.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
2016 Alfa Romeo 4C Spider: Spinning a web of fines and court costs. Price: $74,295 as tested. The base price is $63,900, and the test vehicle added $2,200 for the Spider Track Package, which put a lot of lightweight carbon fiber in spots; more options discussed throughout. Marketer's pitch: "Exhilaration exposed. " Conventional wisdom: Car and Driver says "the 4C practically anticipates road challenges, but the seats are tight, there's almost no luggage room, and it's so low it's tough to get out of. ... " Reality: "Well, hello, Officer.
SPORTS
December 27, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Free-agent pitcher Kevin Millwood reached a preliminary agreement yesterday on a $60 million, five-year contract with Texas, giving the Rangers the legitimate No. 1 starter they have been seeking. Texas can void the fifth year of the deal if Millwood, who pitched a no-hitter for the Phillies in 2003, does not pitch a certain number of innings. Millwood is expected to undergo a physical today in Texas, and the deal likely will be finalized tomorrow. Millwood was 9-11 this year in his only season with the Cleveland Indians.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Aubrey Whelan
Saturday Start your engines Classic cars once driven for 24 Hours of Le Mans will be displayed Saturday at the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum, 6825-31 Norwitch Dr. The race, first held in 1923, is one of the world's best-known endurance racing competitions. Among the cars will be a 1933 Alfa Romeo that once led the race, a 1934 MG K3 Magnette that finished fourth, and a 1936 Aston Martin Le Mans, built specifically for the race. You can see the cars being driven on a three-acre lot at the museum and attend a brief lecture on their historical significance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
2016 Alfa Romeo 4C Spider: Spinning a web of fines and court costs. Price: $74,295 as tested. The base price is $63,900, and the test vehicle added $2,200 for the Spider Track Package, which put a lot of lightweight carbon fiber in spots; more options discussed throughout. Marketer's pitch: "Exhilaration exposed. " Conventional wisdom: Car and Driver says "the 4C practically anticipates road challenges, but the seats are tight, there's almost no luggage room, and it's so low it's tough to get out of. ... " Reality: "Well, hello, Officer.
NEWS
October 3, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The connections between Philadelphia and Italy run deeper than great cuisine, including influences on colonial architecture and politics. Andrea Canepari, Italy's consul general in the city, rightly wants to strengthen them with Ciao Philadelphia, the second annual monthlong celebration of Italo-Philadelphian links. Held through October, this year's festival (ciaophiladelphia.com) is to include tours of Independence Mall and the Union League that highlight Italian contributions to American history.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The redesigned 2015 Chrysler 200 is not without technological bragging rights: It is the first midsize sedan with a nine-speed automatic transmission (which is standard), and it boasts the most powerful engine in its class. But perhaps what is most notable about the new family sedan is the extent to which it is in a family way. Brandon Faurote, the head of Chrysler brand exterior design, told me that this car is really the first step in establishing "a family resemblance for all Chryslers.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
Sergio Pininfarina, 85, whose design firm created the rakish and elegant auto bodies of some of the most popular, and fastest, cars ever made by Ferrari, Alfa Romeo, Maserati, and Fiat, died Tuesday at his home in Turin, Italy. In 1961, Mr. Pininfarina took the reins of the family company from his father, Battista, who founded it under the name Carrozzeria Pinin Farina in 1930 and then rebuilt it virtually from scratch after Allied bombers destroyed its plant along with the rest of Italy's industrial base in World War II. The younger Pininfarina, who brought a flair for marketing as well as design to the family business, scored his first successes in collaboration with Ferrari, the race-car maker known for its lucrative business in rich men's toys.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
A doctor who grew up in Kensington collects what others overlook, displaying his finds in a quirky manner and gaining more notice abroad than at home. Think of Fred Simeone as the Albert Barnes of classic racing cars. On Wednesday, Simeone, 75, of Chestnut Hill, a retired Philadelphia neurosurgeon, will don black tie in London, where his Simeone Foundation Museum is short-listed for an International Historic Motoring Award. A big deal. But there's a good chance you've not visited the Simeone museum, unless you happened to be driving among the gentleman's clubs and rental-car lots in the wastelands off Essington Avenue and followed the placards pointing to the "race car museum.
NEWS
November 7, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard A. Hanna told an Inquirer reporter in 1961 that he had fallen in love with car racing while still in grammar school. "I've been a racing nut ever since I was 11 years old," he said, "when I got my first Model T Ford. " He didn't say where an 11-year-old was allowed to drive a car - let alone race one - in those less restrictive days of 1930, but it must have been good training. By the time of that 1961 interview, the 42-year-old was in first place in the national championship standings of the Sports Car Club of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Aubrey Whelan
Saturday Start your engines Classic cars once driven for 24 Hours of Le Mans will be displayed Saturday at the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum, 6825-31 Norwitch Dr. The race, first held in 1923, is one of the world's best-known endurance racing competitions. Among the cars will be a 1933 Alfa Romeo that once led the race, a 1934 MG K3 Magnette that finished fourth, and a 1936 Aston Martin Le Mans, built specifically for the race. You can see the cars being driven on a three-acre lot at the museum and attend a brief lecture on their historical significance.
SPORTS
December 27, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Free-agent pitcher Kevin Millwood reached a preliminary agreement yesterday on a $60 million, five-year contract with Texas, giving the Rangers the legitimate No. 1 starter they have been seeking. Texas can void the fifth year of the deal if Millwood, who pitched a no-hitter for the Phillies in 2003, does not pitch a certain number of innings. Millwood is expected to undergo a physical today in Texas, and the deal likely will be finalized tomorrow. Millwood was 9-11 this year in his only season with the Cleveland Indians.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Patrons and sponsors of the Harcum Junior College 75th Birthday Ball were feted at the Bryn Mawr home of Sandy and Tom Pew last Thursday evening. The Pews and Arthur and Marilyn Klein chaired the sponsor and patron event, which was attended by more than 50 people. Sandy Pew is a 1972 graduate of the school. Elizabeth Schoch of Haverford and Bernard Guth of Andalusia are general chairmen for the ball, which will take place at 7 p.m. on Nov. 30 at the Merion Cricket Club in Haverford.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
For the last 15 years or so, Alfa Romeo has been laboring mightily to achieve mediocrity. Often, the attempts to earn a C didn't work out, as suggested by an assortment of sour citrus that included the Alfetta and the Milano. Recently, the Italian automaker decided to do something about a lemon legend that was beginning to rival its sporting heritage. It set out to build an automobile that exuded quality as well as an exciting image. The result was the 164, which Alfa believes is the most advanced, highest- quality car it has ever built.
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