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Alfred Uhry

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The love between composer Kurt Weill and singer Lotte Lenya was real, but their marriage was frequently tortured. Tortured is too strong a description for LoveMusik, the new musical about their relationship that opened under Harold Prince's direction Thursday night on Broadway. The show never works up enough passion for that. Where is the spark? Not in Alfred Uhry's (Driving Miss Daisy) script, which puts on the brakes when the story should glide. Nor in Weill's songs, which often arrive in bits and pieces, and sometimes irritatingly fail to serve the plot.
NEWS
March 12, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you think you know Driving Miss Daisy because you've seen the fine movie that won 1989 Oscars for best picture and Jessica Tandy's title-role performance, you haven't taken the full ride. The movie was meticulously faithful to Alfred Uhry's play about a black chauffeur and the cantankerous Southern Jewish woman he endures as his passenger. But when its two protagonists spar and age, alive before you and without even a real car, the power of the script bursts through the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
No recent movies have attacked racism as effectively as "Do the Right Thing" or "Driving Miss Daisy," although the approaches could hardly be more different. "Do the Right Thing" carved up the issue with the cinematic equivalent of a chainsaw. "Driving Miss Daisy" relies on subtlety and diplomacy. In fact, the word "racist" never surfaces in "Driving Miss Daisy," set in changing post-World War II Atlanta. When the subject is mentioned at all, it's described by the slightly more genteel word of that era - "prejudiced.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Driving Miss Daisy won a Pulitzer Prize and had a long Off-Broadway run starting in 1987. The movie version did well at the box office and won an Oscar for Jessica Tandy. In terms of popular appeal and critical acclaim, Alfred Uhry's script was successful. I'll argue with that success and say that the play (I never saw the movie) doesn't do much for me. Both the 1988 touring version, starring Julie Harris and Brock Peters, and the current production at the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts, which is in lesser but certainly competent hands, leave me unmoved.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
While many know Driving Miss Daisy as the Academy Award-winning 1989 movie, the excellent production that opens the 10th season of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival reminds us that the Pulitzer Prize-winning play is also fine theater. Alfred Uhry's work about the 25-year relationship between an elderly, upper-middle-class Jewish widow and her black chauffeur is well-written and adroitly constructed. It's a play almost totally immersed in its two major characters, and at this production one is more than pleased to spend an hour and half in the company of Charles Dumas and Peg French, who portray them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
The Walnut Street Theatre Co. today announced a tentative schedule for the 1987-88 season in conjunction with the launching of its annual subscription campaign. The initial offering for the Walnut's 5th season as a regional producing company is listed as the Michael Frayn backstage comedy "Noises Off" (Oct. 24-Nov. 22), to be followed by the Jule Styne-Bob Merrill-Isobel Lennart musical, "Funny Girl" (Dec. 5-Jan. 3), based on the life of comedienne Fanny Brice. The season moves briskly into the new year with "The Admirable Crichton" (Jan.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | By Ben Yagoda, Daily News Movie Critic
Legend has it that NBC programming czar Brandon Tartikoff came up with the idea for "Miami Vice" by uttering one word and three initials: "MTV cops. " I have no way of proving it, but I strongly suspect that "Mystic Pizza" was conceived by a Tartikoff wannabe who one day, a faraway look in his eyes, said, " 'Breaking Away' with girls. " The movie is about three 20-ish young women who work in a pizza parlor in the seaside town of Mystic, Conn. Jojo (Lili Taylor) and the sisters Daisy and Kat (Julia Roberts and Annabeth Gish)
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Well, no wonder Johnnie Hobbs Jr. taught acting at the University of the Arts for 30 years: His performance, in the Walnut Independence Studio's production of Driving Miss Daisy as the African American chauffeur, Hoke, is a master class in how to do it. Alfred Uhry's much-loved play is familiar both from many, many stage productions and from the luminous movie starring Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman, so it is a particular challenge to bring...
NEWS
September 22, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Hedgerow Theatre must figure you know all about Driving Miss Daisy, Alfred Uhry's 1987 Pulitzer Prize-winning play that was made into a 1989 Academy Award-winning movie. You probably also know it's about an African American man and the Jewish woman he chauffeurs around Atlanta for the third quarter of the 20th century. You might even know that it was the first installment of Uhry's Atlanta Trilogy, an acclaimed trio topped off by The Last Night of Ballyhoo and the musical Parade. You've probably also already seen it in one form or another and are wondering how Hedgerow might invigorate the old blossom.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1990 | By Martha Southgate, New York Daily News
While Hollywood has long turned to theater for inspiration, it's rare that the movies appear while the play is still running. Except for this year. Right now, two of off-Broadway's most acclaimed recent offerings, "Driving Miss Daisy" and "Steel Magnolias," are making a splash in both neighborhood multiplexes and Off-Broadway theaters. ("Driving Miss Daisy" arrives in Philadelphia on Friday.) The number of similarities between the two plays is remarkable. Both are small plays set in Southern towns and based on members of the writers' families.
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NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Well, no wonder Johnnie Hobbs Jr. taught acting at the University of the Arts for 30 years: His performance, in the Walnut Independence Studio's production of Driving Miss Daisy as the African American chauffeur, Hoke, is a master class in how to do it. Alfred Uhry's much-loved play is familiar both from many, many stage productions and from the luminous movie starring Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman, so it is a particular challenge to bring...
NEWS
September 22, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Hedgerow Theatre must figure you know all about Driving Miss Daisy, Alfred Uhry's 1987 Pulitzer Prize-winning play that was made into a 1989 Academy Award-winning movie. You probably also know it's about an African American man and the Jewish woman he chauffeurs around Atlanta for the third quarter of the 20th century. You might even know that it was the first installment of Uhry's Atlanta Trilogy, an acclaimed trio topped off by The Last Night of Ballyhoo and the musical Parade. You've probably also already seen it in one form or another and are wondering how Hedgerow might invigorate the old blossom.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The love between composer Kurt Weill and singer Lotte Lenya was real, but their marriage was frequently tortured. Tortured is too strong a description for LoveMusik, the new musical about their relationship that opened under Harold Prince's direction Thursday night on Broadway. The show never works up enough passion for that. Where is the spark? Not in Alfred Uhry's (Driving Miss Daisy) script, which puts on the brakes when the story should glide. Nor in Weill's songs, which often arrive in bits and pieces, and sometimes irritatingly fail to serve the plot.
NEWS
March 12, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you think you know Driving Miss Daisy because you've seen the fine movie that won 1989 Oscars for best picture and Jessica Tandy's title-role performance, you haven't taken the full ride. The movie was meticulously faithful to Alfred Uhry's play about a black chauffeur and the cantankerous Southern Jewish woman he endures as his passenger. But when its two protagonists spar and age, alive before you and without even a real car, the power of the script bursts through the theater.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Shortly after composer Jason Robert Brown won the Tony Award for the Broadway musical Parade, his telephone answering machine carried a sardonic message: "You can find me flipping burgers at White Castle. " That, from one who's considered one of Broadway's smartest and most sophisticated songwriters since Stephen Sondheim? The 1998 show had closed at a loss, leaving him new-found fame without fortune - or, for that matter, rent money. He'd been plucked from obscurity by director Hal Prince and author Alfred Uhry for a musical about lynchings in the Deep South.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
While many know Driving Miss Daisy as the Academy Award-winning 1989 movie, the excellent production that opens the 10th season of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival reminds us that the Pulitzer Prize-winning play is also fine theater. Alfred Uhry's work about the 25-year relationship between an elderly, upper-middle-class Jewish widow and her black chauffeur is well-written and adroitly constructed. It's a play almost totally immersed in its two major characters, and at this production one is more than pleased to spend an hour and half in the company of Charles Dumas and Peg French, who portray them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Driving Miss Daisy won a Pulitzer Prize and had a long Off-Broadway run starting in 1987. The movie version did well at the box office and won an Oscar for Jessica Tandy. In terms of popular appeal and critical acclaim, Alfred Uhry's script was successful. I'll argue with that success and say that the play (I never saw the movie) doesn't do much for me. Both the 1988 touring version, starring Julie Harris and Brock Peters, and the current production at the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts, which is in lesser but certainly competent hands, leave me unmoved.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
No recent movies have attacked racism as effectively as "Do the Right Thing" or "Driving Miss Daisy," although the approaches could hardly be more different. "Do the Right Thing" carved up the issue with the cinematic equivalent of a chainsaw. "Driving Miss Daisy" relies on subtlety and diplomacy. In fact, the word "racist" never surfaces in "Driving Miss Daisy," set in changing post-World War II Atlanta. When the subject is mentioned at all, it's described by the slightly more genteel word of that era - "prejudiced.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1990 | By Martha Southgate, New York Daily News
While Hollywood has long turned to theater for inspiration, it's rare that the movies appear while the play is still running. Except for this year. Right now, two of off-Broadway's most acclaimed recent offerings, "Driving Miss Daisy" and "Steel Magnolias," are making a splash in both neighborhood multiplexes and Off-Broadway theaters. ("Driving Miss Daisy" arrives in Philadelphia on Friday.) The number of similarities between the two plays is remarkable. Both are small plays set in Southern towns and based on members of the writers' families.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | By Ben Yagoda, Daily News Movie Critic
Legend has it that NBC programming czar Brandon Tartikoff came up with the idea for "Miami Vice" by uttering one word and three initials: "MTV cops. " I have no way of proving it, but I strongly suspect that "Mystic Pizza" was conceived by a Tartikoff wannabe who one day, a faraway look in his eyes, said, " 'Breaking Away' with girls. " The movie is about three 20-ish young women who work in a pizza parlor in the seaside town of Mystic, Conn. Jojo (Lili Taylor) and the sisters Daisy and Kat (Julia Roberts and Annabeth Gish)
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