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Algae

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NEWS
May 30, 1987 | By Andrew Maykuth, Doreen Carvajal and Chris Conway, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey environmental officials said yesterday that an enormous brown slick that had forced about 35 miles of the state's beaches to close was actually dead algae - not sewage sludge - and that it was perfectly safe. Local officials, happy at the news, reopened the beaches. "It is not sewage. It is naturally occurring," Richard Dewling, the commissioner of the state Department of Environmental Protection, said of the foamy slick that had created alarm at the shore. He said the algae, which periodically die and turn brown, passed through an offshore sludge-dumping site and apparently picked up some sewage, trash and "grease balls," which bear a close resemblance to fecal matter.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The annual spring algae bloom on the Wissahickon Creek, combined with Friday's torrential rains, has produced foul-smelling and odd-tasting water for a number of Philadelphians. Even though the tap water may reek, Water Department officials said yesterday that it was safe to drink. They are working to make the water taste like water again. Neighborhoods that got the algae-tainted water included Manayunk, Roxborough, Mount Airy, Germantown, Fairmount and several other areas north of the Schuylkill and west of Broad Street, according to Joan Becker, a Water Department spokeswoman.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County has started removing out-of-control algae from Newton Lake, but longer-term measures, including costly dredging, may be needed to maintain it, according to consultants and county officials. For the bulk of the next two weeks, Princeton Hydro, hired for about $25,000, will work on algae at the lake, which touches parts of Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Oaklyn. The workers will use an amphibious machine called a Truxor to rake up and remove the algae mats that all spring have been choking the lake and zapping its oxygen.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Brown has caught bass, sunfish, and three kinds of catfish in Newton Lake, a man-made lake and favorite fishing spot that winds through Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Oaklyn. "They're all fun to catch," Brown, of Oaklyn, said Sunday, leaning next to his tackle box on a railing overlooking the lake, a line lowered into the algae-spotted water below. In the last year, algae grew so thick Brown said fish were coming up to the surface, searching for air. The situation has improved, he said, one week into an algae-removal project led by Camden County, which owns the 103-acre park surrounding the lake.
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Last year, you wrote about what to do about black marks on roofs. You said it was algae that built up from the product used in the shingles, and you gave a remedy for cleaning it off the shingles. Well, I cut your article out for a spring project and, yep, you guessed it, now that spring is here, I cannot find the article. I wonder if you can tell me again how I can remove the unsightly black marks from my roof easily. Answer: Fiberglass asphalt shingles these days have a limestone filler instead of the traditional rag filler, and the limestone promotes the growth of algae that shows up in horrible streaks on roof areas that don't get much sun. Have your roofer nail copper or zinc strips on the peaks above these areas, so rain running over the strips will kill the algae.
NEWS
June 29, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Mayor Bill Pikolycky, Woodbine's old landfill has been a big headache. Closed for decades, the 45-acre property is covered with scruffy vegetation and needs an environmental cleanup that would cost the tiny Cape May County borough millions of dollars. The site began to look like an opportunity, however, after the mayor heard Andrew Greene's unusual proposal. Greene sees the landfill as a prime location for Garden State Ethanol, a $200 million biofuel plant that would use more than 100 bioreactor tanks to convert algae into ethanol and biodiesel oil. And Pikolycky sees the venture as a way to generate tax income and jobs and to have the site remediated at no expense to the borough.
NEWS
September 9, 1995 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rena Ocone, of Wyndmoor, recently noticed a peculiar bouquet emanating from her tap water. The taste was something else. "I made a cup of tea, and it didn't taste like tea," she recalled yesterday. "I threw it out. " Her neighbor, Oscar Teller, knew what she was talking about. "I don't know how much dirt you've eaten in your life," he said, "but to me, it tastes like earth. " The persistent drought, which has been blamed for almost everything else, is also the culprit in this case, water company officials said yesterday.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | By Heather Dewar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
From the Bahamas to Belize, many of the Caribbean's best-loved coral reefs have fallen victim for the first time to a mysterious, potentially deadly wave of coral bleaching. The phenomenon, unknown to science until the late 1960s, strips the electric-hued corals of their purples, reds and browns, leaving them a ghostly white and sometimes causing them to die. Though poorly understood, it has been linked to unusually high water temperatures and levels of ultraviolet radiation, prompting some to speculate that it is a sign of global warming.
NEWS
August 28, 1996 | By James M. O'Neill and Matthew Futterman, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondent Jacqueline L. Urgo contributed to this article
Diehards who toughed it out at the Jersey Shore this summer must have felt a bit like Egypt's ol' Pharoah in the Book of Exodus. First the oil spill and those tar balls. Then the sodden blasts from Hurricane Bertha. Then the weeks of cool and rainy air. Then the prickly bites from swarms of no-see-ums. Then the thousands of pounds of stinky dead fish. What could possibly be next? How about some green slime in the water? No problem. There it was, tinting the waves and staining the sand at numerous beaches along the South Jersey coast this week.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The paintings of algae seem to glow with a greenish light, the slender fronds rendered with painstaking detail at up to 1,000 times actual size. The eye of 19th-century artist Cornelius Varley was involved in creating the images, but something else was at work: A sophisticated optical instrument that gave him the illusion of seeing the algae right on his canvas. Think it makes the artist's job easy? Think again. Varley's algae watercolors, along with a variety of such optical instruments, are on display at the American Philosophical Society Museum through Dec. 29, including three devices that visitors can look through as they attempt their own sketches.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The paintings of algae seem to glow with a greenish light, the slender fronds rendered with painstaking detail at up to 1,000 times actual size. The eye of 19th-century artist Cornelius Varley was involved in creating the images, but something else was at work: A sophisticated optical instrument that gave him the illusion of seeing the algae right on his canvas. Think it makes the artist's job easy? Think again. Varley's algae watercolors, along with a variety of such optical instruments, are on display at the American Philosophical Society Museum through Dec. 29, including three devices that visitors can look through as they attempt their own sketches.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County officials have decided to hold off on plans to treat Newton Lake with a pesticide intended to control algae growth. The backup treatment may not be necessary, Freeholder Jeffrey Nash said Monday. "We'll monitor and make a decision in two weeks," Nash said. Last month, Princeton Hydro, a Ringoes, N.J.-based firm hired by the county, raked up and removed a huge volume of algae mats that had been choking the lake and depleting its oxygen. Treating the lake, which touches parts of Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Oaklyn, with the algicide Captain was going to be the next step.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Brown has caught bass, sunfish, and three kinds of catfish in Newton Lake, a man-made lake and favorite fishing spot that winds through Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Oaklyn. "They're all fun to catch," Brown, of Oaklyn, said Sunday, leaning next to his tackle box on a railing overlooking the lake, a line lowered into the algae-spotted water below. In the last year, algae grew so thick Brown said fish were coming up to the surface, searching for air. The situation has improved, he said, one week into an algae-removal project led by Camden County, which owns the 103-acre park surrounding the lake.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County has started removing out-of-control algae from Newton Lake, but longer-term measures, including costly dredging, may be needed to maintain it, according to consultants and county officials. For the bulk of the next two weeks, Princeton Hydro, hired for about $25,000, will work on algae at the lake, which touches parts of Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Oaklyn. The workers will use an amphibious machine called a Truxor to rake up and remove the algae mats that all spring have been choking the lake and zapping its oxygen.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We moved into a home with 20-year-old sliding glass doors that were treated with what appears to be a thin plastic coating or plastic shield for sun glare. Is there any way to remove this coating? One slider has clouded over, and the coating has chipped and blistered in spots. It could be a broken seal, but the areas that have no coating are perfectly clear. Answer: The best solution I've read is from my buddies the Carey Bros. of San Francisco: Spray the coating with ammonia, cover it immediately with Saran Wrap, wait 45 minutes, and then scrape it off with a broad-blade putty knife.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
City bankruptcy challenge nixed SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The city of Stockton, Calif., can continue in bankruptcy after a federal judge Monday rejected legal challenges by Wall Street creditors. The ruling by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein means that the city of more than 290,000 residents can continue to seek protection from its creditors as the largest city in America to declare bankruptcy. In his 90-minute "finding of facts," Klein portrayed Stockton has having negotiated in good faith with creditors that insured a city pension bond and issued bonds for a downtown redevelopment, including a sports arena.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2012 | Al Heavens
Question: We have dark streaks on our roof that have appeared over the last couple of years. Shingles are cedar color.   Our home is a rancher with a hip roof and 4-inch pitch. Streaks are unsightly, and we don't know what procedure to follow to get rid of them. You may have addressed this issue previously. If so, I missed it. Don't know why because I read you faithfully.   Answer: I've been waiting for the return of this question since 2009.   The "stain" is, of course, black algae.
NEWS
August 20, 2011
TRENTON - Environmental officials are tracking an unusually large algae bloom off the Jersey Shore. Officials say the bloom, which extends nearly 100 miles, is not expected to pose any danger to people or marine life. It is believed to be a naturally driven event, with the mass of microscopic plants growing on nutrients pulled up from deep waters by upwelling. The bloom is several miles offshore and runs along roughly two-thirds of the New Jersey coastline, from the southern end of Monmouth County to Cape May. - AP
LIVING
December 18, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: The roof on my split-level house is "stained," says e-mailer "Bob from the Suburbs. " Is it mold??My roof looks discolored and it looks like I'm ready for a new one. In my development, roofs facing the sun are in excellent condition. Roofs facing away from the sun also have that black stain, so it can't be just me. I'm afraid to put detergent on it after the Home Depot roofing manager said the store doesn't sell a product for this problem. Answer: I talked with Berwyn roofer Dennis Dunbar, owner of Dunbar Roofing & Siding, about the issue.
NEWS
November 6, 2009 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On his way in from the fields, a woman in a windbreaker stopped Tom Jarvis to inquire about the rabbits. His farm keeps four black-and-white floppy-eared rabbits in a hutch out back, and didn't Jarvis think, the woman asked hesitantly, that their algae-stained water bottles could do with a cleaning? "They're refilled every day, but we'll take a look," Jarvis replied. Once inside, he tugged on his baseball cap and shrugged. "Algae? What does she think's in the water they drink out of in the wild?"
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