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Algeria

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NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
Breaking News update: ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) - Algerian official: 20 foreign hostages, including Americans, escape from their captors. More to come; the original story is below:   ALGIERS, Algeria - As Algerian army helicopters clattered overhead deep in the desert, Islamist extremists hunkered down for the night in a natural gas complex they had assaulted Wednesday morning, killing two people and taking dozens of foreigners hostage in...
NEWS
October 11, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
President Chadli Bendjedid, speaking to the nation last night, vowed to address economic complaints that caused the rioting in which an estimated 300 people died in battles with troops. He also hinted he may not run for another term. His address came hours after troops fired machine guns into a crowd of more than 10,000 in the Algiers district of Bab-el-Oued. Witnesses estimated that 25 to 30 people were killed. Dozens of others were wounded, some seriously. The government has provided no casualty figures, but reliable reports from police, hospitals and other sources indicate that as many as 300 have died in the week of unrest.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Algeria marked a fateful anniversary Jan. 12. It has been five years since the military-backed regime canceled national elections, aborting a bold experiment in democracy that had little precedent in the Arab world. Nearly every day the last two weeks, Algerians have been reminded of the staggering cost of that decision, which unleashed a horrific torrent of bloodletting. Last week, five car bombs rocked Algiers, the capital, and outlying towns. Entire families have been massacred by shadowy militants.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The red carpet curling up a spiral staircase in city hall to the mayor's second-floor office is roped off now, like some museum relic. The current fundamentalist mayor walks up a modest concrete stairwell to the rear of city hall, better to remind the people that it is more than religious piety that sets him apart from the men who ran Blida and the country for 30 years. Up in the Atlas Mountains overlooking Blida, three men from town sit nursing a bottle of red wine and shivering in an unheated bar appropriately named Le Terminus, or the end of the line.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
A powerful earthquake which struck western Algeria early today killed at least 126 people and injured 237, Algeria radio, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corporation, reported. The quake, which hit about 250 miles west of Algiers, registered a magnitude of 5.4, according to the Global Physics Institute in Strasbourg, France. There was considerable damage to buildings and property, according to rescue officials, quoted on national radio. Many people were left without shelter, the report said.
SPORTS
June 23, 2010 | By FRANK BERTUCCI, bertucf@phillynews.com
A year ago the United States needed a miracle in South Africa, a three-goal win over Egypt and a three-goal loss by Italy to Brazil, to advance to the semifinals of the Confederations Cup. This year a simple one-goal win will eliminate the need for divine intervention. A win over Algeria this morning in the teams' final first-round Group C game and the U.S. team marches on to the World Cup's second round, England and Slovenia be damned. A tie with the Desert Foxes, who unfortunately do not have someone named Rommel on their roster, and that England-Slovenia game, which will be played at the same time as U.S.-Algeria, becomes the game of the year.
SPORTS
June 19, 2010
The United States would advance with a victory over Algeria, which would give it five points. Because England plays Slovenia, one of those teams can't finish with five. The United States would advance with a draw against Algeria, which would give it three points, as long as England loses to Slovenia or England-Slovenia ends in a draw and the U.S. maintains a goal advantage over England. Currently, the U.S. has three goals and England has one. One scenario could lead to lots being drawn for who advances.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
WHY IS IT that we forgave Great Britain, forgave the French, forgave Morocco, forgave Algeria, forgave Tunis, forgave Tripoli, forgave Great Britain (again), forgave Algeria (again), forgave Tunis (again), forgave Tripoli (again), forgave Canada, forgave Mexico, forgave the South? Forgave Spain, forgave the Philippines, forgave Mexico (again), forgave Germany, forgave Bulgaria, forgave Turkey, forgave Austria-Hungary, forgave Germany (again), forgave Italy, forgave Japan, forgave China, forgave Vietnam, forgave the Soviet Union, forgave Kosovo, forgave Afghanistan and are in the process of forgiving Iraq - yet we continue to punish Cuba?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It is 1962 in a peaceful Gallic village far from Algeria, which has just been made independent of France. But in Wild Reeds, that nation's involvement in Algeria has mortal repercussions for the secondary school students in the village, teenagers struggling to define themselves intellectually and sexually as their country sorts itself out politically. In his involving film, one of the best in the festival, director Andre Techine creates living characters instead of sociopolitical symbols.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | Daily News wire services
LONDON THREATENING LETTERS FROM HIJACK GROUP A series of letters, purportedly from the Muslim extremist group that hijacked an Air France jet, threatened to kill Americans, Britons and Germans in Algeria if their embassies do not close by Saturday. The letters were signed by the Armed Islamic Group, the most radical group fighting a three-year-old insurgency against Algeria's military-installed government. Britain and the United States said their embassies in Switzerland received warning letters signed by the group.
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SPORTS
March 30, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union goalkeeper Rais Mbolhi was a World Cup standout last summer, but he didn't feel like one during a late-season home game against the Chicago Fire. With the game winding down in second-half stoppage time, Mbolhi made an errant pass that turned into a goal as the Fire salvaged a 1-1 tie Oct. 2 at PPL Park. Allowing two points to slip away that day, the Union kept sliding out of playoff contention. That game and Mbolhi's miscue were brought up this past week - not by the team, but reporters - because the Union will visit the Fire on Sunday for a Major League Soccer game between teams looking for their first win. The Union (0-1-2)
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Elaine Ganley, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - The death toll from the terrorist siege at a natural gas plant in the Sahara climbed past 80 on Sunday as Algerian forces searching the refinery for explosives found two dozen more bodies, many so badly disfigured it was unclear whether they were hostages or militants, a security official said. Algerian special forces stormed the plant on Saturday to end the four-day siege, moving in to thwart what government officials said was a plot by the Islamic extremists to blow up the complex and kill all their captives with mines sown throughout the site.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Michael Birnbaum and Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
An attack on a remote natural-gas complex in the Sahara desert was conducted by an international band of Islamist militants, apparently including two Canadians, who wore Algerian army uniforms and had help from the inside, Algeria's prime minister said Monday, in his government's first official accounting of the bloody four-day siege. Three Americans died in the violence and seven U.S. citizens survived, the State Department said Monday. The Algerian government captured three of the militants alive, Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal told reporters in Algiers, in remarks carried by the state-run news agency.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - One American worker at a natural gas complex in Algeria has been found dead, U.S. officials said Friday as the Obama administration sought to secure the release of Americans still being held by militants on the third day of the hostage standoff in the Sahara. The officials identified the dead American as Frederick Buttaccio, a Texas resident, but said it was unclear how he died. They said U.S. officials recovered Buttaccio's remains Friday and notified his family. Officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak publicly on the matter.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
Breaking News update: ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) - Algerian official: 20 foreign hostages, including Americans, escape from their captors. More to come; the original story is below:   ALGIERS, Algeria - As Algerian army helicopters clattered overhead deep in the desert, Islamist extremists hunkered down for the night in a natural gas complex they had assaulted Wednesday morning, killing two people and taking dozens of foreigners hostage in...
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sought Algeria's assistance Monday for any future military intervention in Mali, pressing the North African nation to provide intelligence - if not boots on the ground - to help rout the al-Qaeda-linked militants across its southern border. Clinton, on the first stop of a five-day trip overseas, met with Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika as the United States and its allies ramped up preparations to fight northern Mali's breakaway Islamist republic.
SPORTS
August 7, 2012
AT SOME point during his 800-meter preliminary run on Monday, Taoufik Makhloufi of Algeria determined he had no real shot in the event so he stopped running on the first lap. Speculation is that Makhloufi, the African champion in the 1,500, wanted to conserve energy for that event final on Tuesday, in which he was a strong favorite for a medal. Not so slow, my friend. The International Association of Athletics Federations - track and field's governing body - did not look favorably on Makhloufi's lack of effort.
NEWS
April 14, 2012
PARIS - Algeria's first post-independence president, Ahmed Ben Bella, 95, died Wednesday. He was a charismatic revolutionary who fought alongside the French during World War II before becoming a hero of his own country's liberation struggle. Mr. Ben Bella was born in the town of Maghnia on the Algerian/Moroccan border in December 1916, when Algeria was a French colony. He was called up for military service during World War II, serving first in Marseille, where he briefly played with Olympique Marseille soccer team, and later in Italy, where his bravery saw him decorated by Gen. Charles de Gaulle.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
A year ago, in the opening days of what would become known as the Arab Spring, Tunisian Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi was announcing that he would leave politics after presidential elections were held. But demonstrations forced him to resign a month later and similar protests spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East. Match the listed Arab country that experienced demonstrations or more in the last year with its letter on the map. Answers: C3. 1. Algeria 2. Bahrain 3. Egypt 4. Iraq 5. Jordan 6. Kuwait 7. Libya 8. Morocco 9. Oman 10. Saudi Arabia 11. Syria 12. Tunisia 13. Yemen
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Suzan Fraser, Associated Press
ANKARA, Turkey - Turkey's prime minister on Saturday sharply criticized France for a bill that would make it a crime to deny that the World War I-era mass killing of Armenians was genocide. Saying France should investigate what he claimed was its own "dirty and bloody history" in Algeria and Rwanda, Recep Tayyip Erdogan insisted Turkey would respond "through all kinds of diplomatic means. " Historians estimate that as many as 1.5 million Armenians were killed by Ottoman Turks as their empire collapsed, an event many international experts regard as genocide and that France recognized as such in 2001.
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