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Aliens

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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Roger Moore, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
The standard-issue alien abduction thriller gains a few paranormal touches and a taste of the living dead in Dark Skies , a sometimes hair-raising riff on all the Communions that have come before. It's a passably chilling bit of nonsense that builds on the past, the tropes of the genre, and relies on them for the odd jolt and the occasional ironic laugh. Yes, the aliens are abducting us, but only those of us who didn't heed the warnings of Signs . Keri Russell and Josh Hamilton play struggling suburbanites - she's a real estate agent, he's an unemployed architect - who suddenly have weird lights, weirder noises, nightly kitchen rearranging, and unseen threats to their two boys to go along with a battered marriage, long-term unemployment, and a mortgage in arrears.
NEWS
August 2, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In only two weeks, Aliens has scared up $25 million at the box office, but the man who created the powerhouse sequel came within 25 cents of not doing the film at all. James Cameron, the slightly built, 31-year-old Canadian now basking in rave reviews and listening to the busy jingle of the cash register, says the idea of topping Ridley Scott's Alien (1979) sometimes seemed more terrifying than the monster stalking the spaceship. "It was such a bind that I got the point where I was going to flip a quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
July 30, 1986
My anger rose over the contents of Meredith M. Henry's July 20 article "Kennett Square tense over workers' housing. " Did it ever occur to the officials doing the housing inspections to hire someone who speaks the primary language of the tenants to understand their needs and concerns? Of course not. These people don't deserve the same basic rights as the rest of us. After all, they're just aliens from Mexico. Why am I not surprised that the article mentions mainly the complaints of the residents of the area without attempting to find out what, I would think, are the valid and more pressing complaints of the workers themselves?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | By Renee V. Lucas, Daily News Staff Writer
John Carpenter's latest nightmare, "They Live," is a lot of things. It's a little bit "V" and a little bit "Lethal Weapon. " A little bit "1984" and a little bit "Rambo. " It's got sledgehammer political satire, humor, goofiness and little bit of Wrestlemania thrown in to boot. Once the action get going, former pro wrestler Roddy Piper is terrific as John Nada, your average out-of-work citizen. Unlike his friend Frank (played to the hilt by Keith David), Nada "believes in America," and "follows the rules.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The aliens in "Mars Attacks" have come to destroy our way of life, and they are doing us a favor. At least in the decidedly eccentric opinion of director Tim Burton - his heroes, remember, include Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood and Pee-wee Herman - whose perspective on American culture is decidedly unique. His is a disaster movie with a twist: We are the disaster. The characters in this movie represent the worst from all walks of American life. They include an image-conscious president (Jack Nicholson)
NEWS
November 13, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Depending on whom you ask, Whitley Strieber is either a genius of make- believe, as evidenced by his Wolfen and The Hunger, or a true believer in parapsychological phenomena, as evidenced in Communion, a first-person account of his encounters with extraterrestrials. Because of their imagistic subjects, Strieber's books are eminently adaptable to the screen. Wolfen hypothesized new forms embodying the spirits of our Native American ancestors. The Hunger put a fresh face on vampires.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Any good farmer knows that corn should be knee-high by the Fourth of July. Apparently, movie producers know this as well. "Independence Day" has arrived, and corn is flourishing in this cheerfully goofy sci-fi epic about an intergalactic army bent on destroying the human population of Earth. A throwback to the B-grade science-fiction thrillers of the 1950s, and the C-grade Irwin Allen disaster movies of the 1970s (think "The Poseidon Adventure"), "Independence Day" throws a bunch of sort-of-famous actors into the path of a catastrophe while we wait around to see who dies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
Topping this week's DVD releases are an animated tale for the family and what could be the launch of a sci-fi franchise. Gnomeo and Juliet, Grade C-minus: Two gnomes from the opposite side of the fence fall in love. James McAvoy and Emily Blunt provide their voices. It took 11 years to make the animated take on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet using garden gnomes. It feels more like it was made in days. The script lacks originality, the Elton John soundtrack feels forced, and the characters are more creepy than cuddly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
James Cameron confronted a monstrous problem in more ways than one in making Aliens. And those members of the audience not hiding under the seats during this powerhouse sequel can only admire the solution. Cameron had the nerve to attempt an encore to one of the truly frightening films of the '70s, a landmark in the revival of screen science fiction in the last decade, Ridley Scott's Alien (1979). Before bringing his celebrated visual prowess to the story of the ill-fated journey of the space freighter Nostromo, Scott clearly absorbed the structure and technique of another masterpiece in terror tactics - Steven Spielberg's Jaws (1975)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Audiences interested in a crash course in Afro-futurism had a chance to see the genre's past and future in Philadelphia last week. Founding father George Clinton played the Ardmore Music Hall on Wednesday, while current torchbearers Shabazz Palaces landed at Union Transfer on Friday, performing for a small but rapt crowd. The duo plays a warped sci-fi mutation of hip-hop that incorporates equal doses of EDM and old-fashioned eccentricity and makes their music sound like nothing else on the current scene.
SPORTS
August 5, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
ATLANTIC CITY - A day after sending shock waves through the boxing world, Bernard Hopkins arrived at Revel Casino sporting a light-blue sports jacket over a yellow V-neck, a main event on his mind. After obliging a throng of fans' requests to pose for photos, the North Philadelphia native took a seat in a brown fold-up chair, just a step or two from the blue canvas and black ropes constructed in the casino's 5,500-person amphitheater. Hopkins, 49 years young, was there to watch his next opponent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014
ARE YOU just hungover from a night of hard partying - or were you abducted by aliens? Apparently it can be difficult to tell, based on this selection of questions that the Mutual UFO Network asks on a questionnaire to determine if you are "an experiencer. " * Have you awoken in bed to find beings in your bedroom? Did you move your body or cry out and then become paralyzed? * Do you have memories of moving rapidly through the air under someone else's control when you were awake in bed and observed intruders in your bedroom?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THINK of "Edge of Tomorrow" as an overdue Harold Ramis tribute movie. Comparisons to Ramis' "Groundhog Day" have already been widely noted - a soldier (Tom Cruise) battling aliens is fated to live the same combat day repeatedly, until he figures out how to outflank his Earth-invading foe. Less widely noted are similarities to "Stripes," the fish-out-of-water service comedy that had Bill Murray misplaced in the U.S. Army, using his slacker charm to transform a company of misfits into a cohesive unit.
SPORTS
October 29, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It was not the retired "Executioner" or the newly minted "Alien" persona that Karo Murat brought out in IBF light-heavyweight champion Bernard Hopkins in their title fight on Saturday at Boardwalk Hall. Annoyed by several dirty tactics employed by his challenger from Germany, Hopkins went way back in his 25-year boxing career - before he became the oldest man to win a world title, before he became a record-setting middleweight champion, even before he became known as "B-Hop.
SPORTS
October 18, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Hopkins, boxing's oldest world champion, wanted to show off his new purchase. But his black boxing gloves created a challenge for the 48-year-old to grasp the alien mask he had bought last month at a Columbus Boulevard costume store. His strength trainer, Danny Davis, put down the purple Styrofoam noodles he was swinging at Hopkins and helped the fighter pull the mask over his face. "They're really going to be checking my blood after this fight. This guy's the alien," said Hopkins, who will defend his IBF heavyweight title on Oct. 26 against 30-year-old Karo Murat (25-1-1, 15 knockouts)
SPORTS
October 18, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
IN LESS THAN 3 months, future Hall of Fame boxer and North Philadelphia native Bernard Hopkins will celebrate his 49th birthday. Despite his age, the oldest fighter ever to win a world championship continues to fight younger opponents at the sport's highest stage, next defending his IBF light-heavyweight title against Karo Murat, 30, on Saturday, Oct. 26 at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City. Formally known as "The Executioner," Hopkins used yesterday's press conference as an opportunity to prove he is still in fine physical shape and to introduce his new identity: The Alien.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
The Humans A Novel By Matt Haig Simon & Schuster. 256 pp. $25. Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler   On Vonnadoria, there are no comforting delusions, no religion, no love, hate, passion, or remorse, no names, no husbands or wives, no death. Reason reigns, and every action originates in a logical motive. Vonnadorians can travel great distances, rearrange their biological ingredients, renew and replenish them. They understand that if the rate of mathematical advancement of Earthlings "exceeds their psychological maturity, then action needs to be taken.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | BY CAROLYN HAX (INQUIRER)
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My parents asked us to match their contributions to our children's savings accounts. While this is well-intentioned advice, we are focusing (in our early 30s) on shoring up our retirement reserves and paying down debt. Not to mention, we both work, and two kids in day care is a significant expense that won't be there forever. I started explaining all this, and I think I did a decent job doing so, but realize I should have said something more along the lines of "If you want to contribute, that's great, but our financial decisions are our business.
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