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NEWS
October 22, 1998 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The Allegheny health system beefed up its legal defense team yesterday in response to a broad government investigation that now includes a criminal probe. Allegheny asked U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Bruce McCullough to widen the scope of responsibilities and the doubling to $500,000 the retainer paid to the law firm of Hahn Loeser & Parks. McCullough must approve such moves and expenditures since the Pittsburgh-based health system filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on July 21, listing $1.3 billion in debts.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | BY DAVID B. THORNBURGH
The Allegheny crisis is a vivid example of the seismic shifts in Greater Philadelphia's health-care economy that the Pennsylvania Economy League warned about nearly 2 1/2 years ago. Nothing that has happened since the report's release - including the proposed acquisition of Allegheny's hospitals - has changed the fundamentals of the situation. Allegheny's plight is symptomatic of major stress in the entire hospital industry. In 1996, the largest regional hospitals sustained an operating loss of $222 million dollars, and only 13 of 51 didn't lose money on an operating basis.
NEWS
October 5, 1998
Vince Mariniello is one of 80,000 creditors who will be lucky to get 15 percent of the $200,000 he is owed by the bankrupt Allegheny health system for floors installed by his Grays Ferry company. As Daily News writer Don Russell reported last week, Mariniello also is an Allegheny creditor of another sort. He is a member of the Variety Club, which raised $1.5 million for the pediatric wing at Hahnemann Hospital - which now, like the other Allegheny institutions in this area, becomes part of Tenet, a for-profit chain.
NEWS
March 19, 2000
Pennsylvania's attorney general last week filed the first criminal charges against the leaders of the defunct Allegheny health system, alleging that they misspent $52.4 million in restricted endowments, orchestrated illegal political contributions, and in one case gave away $50,000 in Allegheny funds for the renovation of a high school locker room. A grand jury in Pittsburgh brought felony theft and misdemeanor charges Wednesday against former chief executive Sherif S. Abdelhak, 54; former chief financial officer David McConnell, 45; and former legal counsel Nancy Wynstra, 58. All three face maximum sentences of 10 to 20 years.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Vanguard Health may be second-guessing its $460 million bid for the bankrupt Allegheny health system, prompting speculation that the Nashville company may lower its offer or drop out of the bidding, several sources said yesterday. Such a move heightens the uncertainty surrounding Allegheny's already shaky future, adding to the ripple effect that promises to roil the entire health-care system - the region's largest employer and economic generator. "I haven't heard from Vanguard in a long time," said Henry Nicholas, president of the Hospital and Healthcare Employees Union District 1199C.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2002 | By Karl Stark and Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Stephen Borland helped keep up Allegheny's mainframe computer before the health giant went bust five years ago, and he still keeps in touch with nearly two dozen former employees. His e-mail lighted up with emotional intensity last week when Allegheny health system's former CEO, Sherif S. Abdelhak, was sentenced to 11 1/2 to 23 months in a work-release facility for raiding $30 million in medical endowments. Only 11? months or less! This guy should be spending life in prison.
NEWS
July 17, 1998
Whoa. The air of crisis surrounding Allegheny health system's huge financial problems should not turn into a panicked stampede to accept any Allegheny scheme to avoid bankruptcy. Rumors are swirling and employees are freaked out, but there are more options than the artificial either/or that has been set up: Either Allegheny is allowed to dump some or all of its nine Philadelphia hospitals to a for-profit bidder of its choosing, it is implied, or it will go bankrupt, which will in turn imperil its medical school since $100 million in federal funding would be jeopardized.
NEWS
January 18, 2002
Just think of it as the Philadelphia region's Enron scandal. Before it collapsed into bankruptcy, the Allegheny health system was: Losing $1 million a day. Firing hundreds of workers. Raiding charitable endowments for millions of dollars. Covering its tracks with public relations spin and creative bookkeeping. From the looks of it, the Pittsburgh-based pirates who ran the nine-hospital system did everything but unfurl the skull and cross bones. The Allegheny collapse remains personal and painful for some folks around here - even as the mopping-up operation from the 1998 bankruptcy gathered steam this week.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Joel J. Roslyn, surgeon, teacher, devoted father and behind-the-scene Samaritan during the collapse of the Allegheny health system, died Sunday of melanoma at his East Falls home. He was 48. Dr. Roslyn was among the first of many young medical talents to be recruited by Allegheny, which in 1988 began expanding into the Philadelphia region from Pittsburgh. In 1992, he left the University of California at Los Angeles, where he had spent 15 years, to become chairman of surgery at the Medical College of Pennsylvania (MCP)
NEWS
October 24, 1998 | By Mark Forrest
What Allegheny did here was a terrible thing. A billion and a half dollars run up in debt. Thousands of jobs put in jeopardy with both physicians and patients at risk. The entire face of health care in the region changed, irrevocably and not for the better. Without a strong manager, Allegheny's medical school may be forced to close. Now there are new allegations that some of the research and endowment money was used to pay operating expenses of the floundering Allegheny empire or used for other purposes entirely.
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NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - There are no doubt partisan battles ahead, but for now, Gov.-elect Tom Wolf is trying to set a positive tone with Republicans who control the state legislature. Wolf, a Democrat, surprised some legislative leaders on the other side of the aisle with a phone call shortly after his election. Then he sent a handwritten introductory note that was read aloud to Republican and Democrats in both chambers during caucus meetings. Then he called some top lawmakers a second time.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
As shade fell Saturday evening on the grassy lot where three siblings were killed by the driver of a carjacked vehicle the day before, a group of 50 people gathered for one purpose - prayer. They prayed for the children, whom many in the crowd had never met; for their mother, clinging to life in a hospital bed; and for themselves. For a half-hour, they cupped their hands around flickering candles, nodded as ministers preached about unfathomable tragedy, and joined in hymns as a guitarist lightly strummed.
NEWS
July 26, 2014
ISSUE | COUNTY BUDGETS So much money, so little citizen input In early July, Burlington County passed its 2014 budget, with taxes for operations, libraries, and open space set at $170 million, or $500,000 less than in 2013, which drew praise. Combined spending approximates $280 million. Potential spending is a half-billion dollars, including a six-year capital spending projection of $247 million. Out of 400,000 residents, the shrinking, missing-in-action press, and the minority party, only one person at the budget vote questioned the use of $500 million in taxpayers' money.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Saying "my heart isn't in it," Pennsylvania House Speaker Sam Smith announced Tuesday that he would not seek reelection. His decision sets the stage for jockeying to replace the blunt-talking, cigar-smoking leader sometimes described as "the closer" for pushing through tricky, high-profile legislation. In making his announcement in the Capitol newsroom, Smith, 58, a Republican from Jefferson County, said a number of factors played into his decision. High among them: "The desire to fight the fights as hard as you can has waned, and I have decided it was time to step aside.
SPORTS
June 5, 2013 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
MECHANICSBURG, Pa. - After a few errant shots during warm-ups scattered a crowd behind the La Salle goal, an assistant coach joked, "We wish they were more accurate, too. " Once the game began, the Explorers seemed as if they never missed. La Salle routed North Allegheny, 14-1, in the PIAA state boys' lacrosse semifinals Tuesday night at Cumberland Valley. La Salle (22-2), which has won 20 games in a row, will face three-time defending state champion Conestoga at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at HersheyPark Stadium in a repeat of last year's title game.
SPORTS
March 24, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the game and during the second intermission, the volume of the music from La Salle's locker room rivaled that of the public address system at IceWorks in Aston. La Salle, coming off its third straight Flyers Cup, was loose, confident, and expected to win its second straight Class AAA state ice hockey championship, even trailing by a goal entering the third period. Despite being outshot, 13-5, in the final period, North Allegheny pulled away for a 6-2 win Saturday. "There are an awful large number of seniors in there who had the opportunity to win a state championship last year," La Salle coach Walter Muehlbronner said.
SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
This, Coatesville coach Matt Ortega realizes, is not the same North Allegheny team that captured state gold in 2010. That year, when they closed with a 21-0 blanking of La Salle, the Tigers used a smash-mouth approach on offense. Now, with a Division I-A recruit at quarterback, they run and pass equally well. "That's why they've had so much success this year," Ortega said. "They switch things up, run different personnel groups in there, and keep you guessing. " Coatesville, bidding for the program's first state title, will square off against District 7's North Allegheny, located outside Pittsburgh, in the PIAA Class AAAA final at 6 p.m. Saturday at Hersheypark Stadium.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
County % of vote   Obama   Romney   Other    Adams 100   14,893   26,490   590    Allegheny 98   327,240   238,679   6,790    Armstrong 100   8,694   19,231   397    Beaver 100   36,833   42,118   1,064    Bedford 100   4,696   16,369   202    Berks 100   79,895   80,857   2,501    Blair 100   15,516   31,500   615    ...
NEWS
March 4, 2012
Employees of Allegheny County in Western Pennsylvania will soon be able to extend their health and dental benefits to a gay or lesbian partner. Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald has signed an executive order allowing county workers to enroll an eligible same-sex domestic partner in benefits starting Monday for coverage beginning April 1. Officials say the new policy makes the county the 187th municipality in the nation to extend health...
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