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Allegiance

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NEWS
September 10, 1988 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In an undisguised effort to turn the Pledge of Allegiance into a political rallying cry, House Republicans yesterday called for the pledge to be recited before every session of Congress. Angered by what the speaker of the House called a "sleazy" political tactic, Democrats voted against the proposed rule change. But a short time later Speaker Jim Wright (D., Texas) announced that House sessions would be opened with the pledge. The announcement brought cheers from the packed chamber, as did his plea that the pledge not become a partisan issue.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
The words were said happily in Mandarin, Hindi and Romanian: "I'm an American citizen. " But in Hannah Kirchhofer's corner in the Chester County Courthouse yesterday, sign language also was used. The 6-year-old South Korean girl, adopted by an American family soon after birth, was one of 44 people to receive citizenship during naturalization ceremonies in West Chester. Most of those naturalized had learned at least enough English to get through the citizenship ceremony. But for Hannah, who has been nearly deaf since birth, the occasion was a special triumph, and her achievement was shared by her teachers and six of her hearing-impaired classmates from Fern Hill Elementary School in West Chester, who were in attendance.
NEWS
July 1, 2002
THANK YOU for your editorial "It's a Pledge, Not a Prayer. " I'm heartened to know that there is someone in a position of authority and influence willing to counter the overwhelming conventional wisdom about the 9th Circuit ruling on the religious references in the Pledge of Allegiance. Jeremy Pittman, Boston Good for you! Your paper took a brave and reasoned stand after the California court ruling on the Pledge of Allegiance. Jeffrey A. Butts, Washington, D.C. If the Pledge is unconstitutional, then money that puts food on our table and says "In God We Trust" must be unconstitutional also!
NEWS
September 22, 2005
WHEN I went to school, we read the Bible and saluted our flag with the Pledge of Allegiance. Then along came an atheist named Madalyn O'Hair, and one fell swoop took the prayer out of our schools. Now we have one man who doesn't want his child to say "under God," and a judge went along with him. We are slowly bowing to those people and granting their requests, and we are going to end up a society where our children will know nothing but terrorists and the fact that a few people are getting the right to change what we have done for many, many years.
NEWS
July 2, 2002
The federal appeals court ruling proclaiming the Pledge of Allegiance unconstitutional is troubling (Inquirer, June 27). I am an ardent supporter of the First Amendment and believe it was crafted in a brilliant way that protects those who choose any religion or no religion at all, yet ensures the rights of others to freely practice their faith as well. Doesn't this ruling result in exactly the type of governmental interference the founding fathers set out to prevent? Mark Otto Collingswood The Pledge of Allegiance had served us well for about 60 years before Congress' inclusion of the phrase under God made it both a patriotic oath and a public prayer (Inquirer, June 27)
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court said yesterday it will decide whether the Pledge of Allegiance recited by generations of American schoolchildren is an unconstitutional blending of church and state. The case sets up an emotional showdown over God in the public schools and in public life. It will settle whether the phrase "one nation under God" will remain a part of the patriotic oath as it is recited in most classrooms. The court will hear the case sometime next year. The justices agreed to hear an appeal involving a California atheist whose 9-year-old daughter, like most elementary school children, hears the Pledge of Allegiance recited daily.
NEWS
October 22, 2001
WHO WROTE the Pledge of Allegiance? Was it: A) A newly emancipated slave B) A Baptist Socialist C) An Italian immigrant who fought in the Civil War. If you're scratching your head, you should demand a refund from whatever elementary school you attended. But don't feel bad, we're trying to stump you to make a point. Ever since Sept. 11, Americans have struggled with overwhelming feelings of grief and rage. For solace they have reached for touchstones that have been well worn by previous generations during harder times than now. Sales of the Bible are reportedly way up. For weeks after the attack, you could get a prescription for Cipro faster than you could get an American flag.
NEWS
November 16, 2002
"Patriotism," observed outgoing Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura, "comes from the heart. Patriotism is voluntary . . . A patriot shows their patriotism through their actions, by their choice. " Thus saying, Gov. Ventura this year vetoed a bill that would have required Minnesota schoolchildren to recite the Pledge of Allegiance at least once a week. Minnesota state legislators are not the only ones who erroneously believe patriotism can somehow be forced by government mandate. Post 9/11, several states have rushed to pass laws requiring schools to fly American flags and requiring students to say the pledge.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | BY JAN C. TING
The enlightened news media dismiss the Pledge of Allegiance as a non-issue. They are wrong, and Michael Dukakis is wrong for defending his 1977 veto of a bill requiring Massachusetts teachers to lead their classes in the Pledge. The American people are entitled to judge Dukakis on his understanding of the law, his political ability and record, and his views on eduction and values. His veto of the Flag Pledge bill and his continuing defense of that veto give us valuable insight in all those areas, insight we can and should use next Tuesday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
*  ALLEGIANCE . 10 Thursdays, NBC10. NBC's "Allegiance" brings its reluctant Russian spies - and their CIA agent son - to Philadelphia Thursday. Besides including a cameo for Mayor Nutter, the show, which filmed two episodes here in October, takes viewers inside a local landmark most Philadelphians have seen only from the outside. The Masonic Temple on North Broad Street is the focus of a storyline in which the spies are racing the feds to retrieve something from City Hall on a Sunday without being detected.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Monmouth County, N.J., lawsuit alleging that the words under God in the Pledge of Allegiance violated the rights of an atheist schoolchild and sought to have them stricken has been dismissed. For a local high school senior, that was good news indeed. Samantha Jones, 18, who attends Highland Regional High School; her parents; and two of her siblings had intervenor status in American Humanist Association v. Matawan-Aberdeen Regional School District . The decision "does affirm our right to say under God in the Pledge of Allegiance," Jones said.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blackwood teenager Samantha Jones grew up reciting the Pledge of Allegiance with the words under God , and she is willing to go to court for the right to keeping saying those words. "This is about our freedom as Americans," Jones said. The people who want to see those words taken out of the pledge would say the same thing. Jones, an 18-year-old Highland Regional High School senior, her parents, and her younger sister and brother learned this week that they have been granted intervenor status in a Superior Court case that contends that reciting the pledge violates the rights of atheists and humanists.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2013 | By Scott Mayerowitz, Associated Press
Other U.S. airlines have struggled over the last decade with the ups and downs of the economy and the price of jet fuel, but Allegiant Air has been profitable for 10 straight years. The tiny airline focuses on a niche others ignore: It flies only from small cities, including Allentown, Harrisburg, and Scranton in Pennsylvania, to sunny vacation spots. Allegiant entices people with low fares and nonstop flights. Then it aggressively pitches them hotels, rental cars, show tickets, and other entertainment, earning millions in commissions.
SPORTS
April 29, 2013 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Thursday night, a little after 10 o'clock, Justin Pugh's family and close friends tossed aside their longtime allegiance to Gang Green and became Big Blue Nation disciples. It happened as soon as NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced that Pugh, a 6-foot-4, 310-pound offensive tackle, would be playing for the New York Giants. "I was an Eagles fan growing up, just like all my buddies," the 2009 Council Rock South graduate said. "But with me going to the Giants, everyone is converting over.
NEWS
September 16, 2011
By Sandra Day O'Connor Every morning at the beginning of class, students all over America stand and place their right hands over their hearts to give the Pledge of Allegiance. Sadly, for too many kids, this will be the limit of their civic education and engagement. At a time when our nation is making decisions about fundamental, long-term priorities - economic solvency, budget parameters, health policy, the United States' role in a volatile world, and more - too few Americans are prepared to join or benefit from the debate.
NEWS
May 28, 2011
Jeff Shields' article on Monday ("Allies and allegiances on new City Council") prompts me to pose some questions: Allegiances mentioned included South Philadelphia, the Northwest, and North Philadelphia. OK. But who, specifically, is representing Center City and Northeast Philadelphia, whose residents pay the highest tax bills in the city? Somebody? Nobody? Why is Marian Tasco, a DROP recipient, still a part of the Philly political scene? How did John Dougherty get to be such a power broker?
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
A "new age" in City Council began with Tuesday's primary election, which assured at least six fresh faces on the fourth floor of City Hall, but will the influx bring a new day for Mayor Nutter and the city? More than anything, the election was a victory for a potent but volatile alignment of black political factions from West and Northwest Philadelphia, led by U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah and State Rep. Dwight Evans, respectively. Those camps have feuded on and off since the 1980s, periodically working against each other on campaigns, including the 2007 mayoral primary, in which both Fattah and Evans lost to Nutter.
NEWS
May 14, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
The morning preschool session Friday at St. Mary School in Williamstown was coming to an end for Isabelle Barnes and her classmates, who had heard that a visitor might be dropping by - a soldier who would appreciate the flag they had painted, with their red handprints making stripes. When that visitor arrived, Isabelle was overwhelmed, and eventually ran to him and cried in his arms. It was her beloved uncle Luis Ortiz, back less than 48 hours after a 13-month stint in the Army Reserve in Afghanistan ended.
NEWS
January 9, 2011
Lessons from reading Constitution I was glad to see that Congress opened with a reading of the Constitution ("House GOP says it will stand firm on debt limit," Friday). Tea partyers, including those who believe that the Pledge of Allegiance is found within that document, should listen closely. They may be surprised to learn that the Constitution does not purport to establish a Christian nation, that it does not expand or contract executive power depending upon which party is in office, and that it does not give states or individuals the right to ignore laws with which they disagree.
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