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Allen Ginsberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
America's best-known poet is sitting in the English department at the University of Pennsylvania, trying to eat his macrobiotic lunch. But the beans, carrots and sprouts will have to wait. Allen Ginsberg has too much to talk about. There's so much to recount: the time in 1957 when his culture-rattling "Howl" was on trial on obscenity charges in San Francisco, while he and Jack Kerouac and Peter Orlovsky were in Morocco helping to type and assemble William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Ken Regan, a photojournalist whose reputation for discretion earned him a backstage pass to the private realms of rock stars and other celebrities, including Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, died last Sunday in Manhattan. The cause was cancer, his daughter Suzanne Regan said. Mr. Regan was the official photographer for the Rolling Stones on several tours in the 1970s and Kennedy's unofficial personal photographer in the last four decades of his life. He was also the official photographer for Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975, and the Live Aid concert in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two celebrated American poets, Galway Kinnell and Allen Ginsberg, will appear in the Philadelphia area today and tomorrow to read from their works. Kinnell, appearing this afternoon at the University of Pennsylvania, will read from his ninth and latest book of poetry, The Past. It is his first collection of poetry since his Selected Poems, published in 1982, brought him three awards - the Pulitzer Prize, the American Book Award and the MacArthur Foundation Award - to add to his string.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
Great writers leave behind that which we like best about them, so who needs a movie? But there is an arrogance in film that implies that people don't fully exist until "immortalized" on screen. It's not enough to be an acclaimed author - at some point, says Hollywood, you must submit to your close-up. Shakespeare must be "in love," or the subject of a dreadful movie ("Anonymous"), suggesting that some other guy wrote all his best stuff. Lately the Beats have had a rough go of it - a dull "On The Road," a documentary ("Magic Trip")
NEWS
October 7, 2005 | By Thomas Devaney
Fifty years ago tonight, the 29-year-old poet Allen Ginsberg was fourth to read in a group of five unknown (in this case, all men) poets at a converted garage turned art gallery on Fillmore Street in San Francisco. These are the first words of a new poem Ginsberg read that night: I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked That first line, and this first reading of Howl at the Six Gallery on Oct. 7, 1955, caused a stir that has yet to settle.
LIVING
April 7, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allen Ginsberg, the Beat Generation icon and tireless counterculture guru who died at 70 Saturday, led the most public of poetic lives. For four decades, Ginsberg maintained a hyperactive, agitating presence in American popular culture. The influence of the Paterson, N.J.-raised son of a schoolteacher-poet father and Russian-emigre Marxist mother went far beyond the realm of poetry and literature. His angry and profane poem "Howl" began a celebrated career as a constant advocate of free speech, and sexual and artistic liberation.
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been three decades since Allen Ginsberg wrote in his poem Howl about seeing the best minds of his generation "destroyed by madness. " In 30 years, the society that Ginsberg raged against, cursed and even affectionately embraced in his verse has, like the poet himself, changed a lot. But Ginsberg - his poems now widely anthologized, the poet himself venerated and on the verge of turning 60 - retains some of his old rage. And he has an opinion about what is happening to the best minds of America's younger generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it Fiascogate. Or the Lupe Fiasco fiasco. (Fiasco-squared for short?) The Chicago rapper born Wasalu Muhammad Jaco was escorted off the stage Sunday at the StartUp RockOn inauguration bash in Washington after engaging in a 30-minute version of the antiwar rap "Words I Never Said," which contained some anti-prez dissing. "[ Rush ] Limbaugh is a racist, Glenn Beck is a racist," Lupe sang, "Gaza Strip was getting bombed, [ Barack ] Obama didn't say [obscenity]. That's why I ain't vote for him. " Lupe, 30, refused to move on to the next tune and was ousted by security guards.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
J. Pierrepont Finch by night, Allen Ginsberg by day. For much of the time that Daniel Radcliffe was busy in New York singing and dancing his way through the 2011 Broadway revival of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying , he was also working with John Krokidas , a first-time filmmaker, preparing for the role of the celebrated Beat poet: teenage Ginsberg, just accepted to Columbia University, where he gets caught up...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2006 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
I saw the best minds of the PEN "World Voices" Literary Festival annoyed by overbooking, starving, hysterical, sometimes not remembering why they were there. . . . How to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Howl, the chantaholic 1956 poem by Allen Ginsberg that became a mantra of the Beat Generation, a countercultural update of Whitman's barbaric yawp, a "Mardi Gras of Freedom" (Robert Pinsky's apt phrase) for every outsider who ever felt a victim of large oppressive forces? How to mark a radical, prophetic scream against everything official and boring in poetry, a long-line, free-verse apotheosis of the experimental and uninhibited (drugs, homosexuality, friendship, you name it)
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NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
Great writers leave behind that which we like best about them, so who needs a movie? But there is an arrogance in film that implies that people don't fully exist until "immortalized" on screen. It's not enough to be an acclaimed author - at some point, says Hollywood, you must submit to your close-up. Shakespeare must be "in love," or the subject of a dreadful movie ("Anonymous"), suggesting that some other guy wrote all his best stuff. Lately the Beats have had a rough go of it - a dull "On The Road," a documentary ("Magic Trip")
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
J. Pierrepont Finch by night, Allen Ginsberg by day. For much of the time that Daniel Radcliffe was busy in New York singing and dancing his way through the 2011 Broadway revival of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying , he was also working with John Krokidas , a first-time filmmaker, preparing for the role of the celebrated Beat poet: teenage Ginsberg, just accepted to Columbia University, where he gets caught up...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it Fiascogate. Or the Lupe Fiasco fiasco. (Fiasco-squared for short?) The Chicago rapper born Wasalu Muhammad Jaco was escorted off the stage Sunday at the StartUp RockOn inauguration bash in Washington after engaging in a 30-minute version of the antiwar rap "Words I Never Said," which contained some anti-prez dissing. "[ Rush ] Limbaugh is a racist, Glenn Beck is a racist," Lupe sang, "Gaza Strip was getting bombed, [ Barack ] Obama didn't say [obscenity]. That's why I ain't vote for him. " Lupe, 30, refused to move on to the next tune and was ousted by security guards.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Ken Regan, a photojournalist whose reputation for discretion earned him a backstage pass to the private realms of rock stars and other celebrities, including Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, died last Sunday in Manhattan. The cause was cancer, his daughter Suzanne Regan said. Mr. Regan was the official photographer for the Rolling Stones on several tours in the 1970s and Kennedy's unofficial personal photographer in the last four decades of his life. He was also the official photographer for Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975, and the Live Aid concert in 1985.
TRAVEL
December 2, 2012 | By Matt Nesvisky, For The Inquirer
I recently revisited the site of my first great travel adventure - after a half-century, almost to the day. The destination of this foray into nostalgia and rediscovery was San Francisco. Why I had allowed a full 50 years to go by without returning to one of America's most beautiful and appealing cities is not easily explained. I had lived outside of the United States for several decades, and once back on the East Coast I was busy with other concerns. Still, San Francisco had always remained in my memory as a fabulous place.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | Reviewed by Lewis Whittington
Eminent Outlaws The Gay Writers Who Changed America By Christopher Bram Twelve. 384 pp. $27.95   Christopher Bram's 1995 novel The Father of Frankenstein may have been fiction but was so accurate in its depiction of '30s gay film director James Whale that it could have passed for biography. Bram shows even more narrative power in his new nonfiction book Eminent Outlaws: The Gay Writers Who Changed America . Bram's portraits of an often-reluctant gay literary vanguard is fascinating enough, but alongside a 50-year narrative of unexplored gay aesthetic, he also provides a parallel history of the gay-rights movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2006 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
I saw the best minds of the PEN "World Voices" Literary Festival annoyed by overbooking, starving, hysterical, sometimes not remembering why they were there. . . . How to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Howl, the chantaholic 1956 poem by Allen Ginsberg that became a mantra of the Beat Generation, a countercultural update of Whitman's barbaric yawp, a "Mardi Gras of Freedom" (Robert Pinsky's apt phrase) for every outsider who ever felt a victim of large oppressive forces? How to mark a radical, prophetic scream against everything official and boring in poetry, a long-line, free-verse apotheosis of the experimental and uninhibited (drugs, homosexuality, friendship, you name it)
NEWS
October 7, 2005 | By Thomas Devaney
Fifty years ago tonight, the 29-year-old poet Allen Ginsberg was fourth to read in a group of five unknown (in this case, all men) poets at a converted garage turned art gallery on Fillmore Street in San Francisco. These are the first words of a new poem Ginsberg read that night: I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked That first line, and this first reading of Howl at the Six Gallery on Oct. 7, 1955, caused a stir that has yet to settle.
LIVING
April 7, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allen Ginsberg, the Beat Generation icon and tireless counterculture guru who died at 70 Saturday, led the most public of poetic lives. For four decades, Ginsberg maintained a hyperactive, agitating presence in American popular culture. The influence of the Paterson, N.J.-raised son of a schoolteacher-poet father and Russian-emigre Marxist mother went far beyond the realm of poetry and literature. His angry and profane poem "Howl" began a celebrated career as a constant advocate of free speech, and sexual and artistic liberation.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC Inquirer staff writer Dan DeLuca contributed to this article. It also includes information from the Associated Press and Reuters
Allen Ginsberg, 70, the premier "Beat Generation" poet of the 1950s whose visionary passion and radicalism made him a countercultural icon for generations of artists, musicians and activists, died yesterday of a heart attack related to inoperable liver cancer. Mr. Ginsberg, who had been informed on March 27 by his doctor at Beth Israel Medical Center that he had 4 to 12 months to live, died at 2:39 a.m. at his Lower East Side apartment. Famously energetic, Mr. Ginsberg - whose flamboyant poetry "happenings" and wild beatnik beard early on made him an internationally familiar figure even to those with little interest in poetry - had been bedridden at home since Wednesday, experiencing extreme fatigue.
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