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Allergy

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NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Pet allergies, which can be triggered by plants, gardening products, flea and tick sprays or collars, are common in summer. They cause skin and coat problems, respiratory difficulties, and more serious reactions. Pets can suffer from the common allergy of hay fever, although the symptoms are not the coughing and sneezing that a human shows. For a dog or cat, hay fever usually involves continual scratching and digging at the skin - the same way that animals react to a flea-bite allergy.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Louis Tuft, internationally prominent allergist, teacher and author, died Tuesday. He was 91 and lived in Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery County. Tuft, who practiced medicine for 65 years, was living on his own, driving his own car and maintaining a Center City medical practice until the day he died. He was professor emeritus at Temple University School of Medicine, retiring only because it was mandatory at age 65. He was widely known for five textbooks and more than 130 medical papers he wrote and for his pioneering work in allergy research.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Allergies in the family are a major reason that animals are taken to pounds or turned loose to die, but there are other ways to deal with the problem. Have a family member who is not allergic brush the pet thoroughly once or twice a day, discarding the brushings in a tightly closed receptacle outdoors. Also, vacuuming furniture and rugs daily can be helpful, as can a discussion with an allergy specialist about the possibility of shots. The breed of the pet may be significant, although length of coat seems not to be a factor: Some flat-coated breeds of dogs, basset hounds, for example, seem to affect adversely many allergy-prone individuals.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The auction to sell the home of Elizabeth Munro Kapner has been delayed pending the outcome of her court appeal. Kapner, 53, who said her Charlestown Township home was built to accommodate her many allergies, filed an appeal in U.S. Bankruptcy Court - an action that stopped the auction. The sale of her two-story home was ordered by Chester County Judge Lawrence Wood in 1984 - the culmination of a long-running divorce battle between Elizabeth Kapner, an artist, and her ex-husband, Alex Kapner, an attorney who works as a federal mediator.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Everywhere you look, people are sneezing. Rubbing their eyes. Rubbing their noses So many people have allergies - an estimated 35 million Americans with pollen allergies - that it makes you wonder. Maybe we're falling apart. As a group, that is. "No, I don't think we're evolving into a weak species," said Dr. Marc Goldstein, Hahnemann University allergist and clinical immunologist. "Our environment is becoming more hostile. We're living in air-polluted environments, outdoors and indoors.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
For the family and friends of Lynn Darren, it just doesn't add up. A medical examiner's ruling - a year later - that Darren, a Rowan University student, wasn't murdered but died of an accidental overdose of cold and allergy medicine, has raised more questions than it answered. Darren, 22, a junior elementary education and psychology major, called her mother in Long Island, N.Y., almost every day. Her family was suspicious of the ruling. "There are a lot of questions we still have," said Darren's stepfather, Clifford Biehl.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
You have allergies? Join the party. Your misery has loads of company. More than 37 million Americans suffer. Better make that party BYO Kleenex, huh? Better not try to tough it out until last call, either. According to Dr. Stephen McGeady, an allergist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, this year's big sneeze-and-wheeze fest won't draw to a close for weeks. Here's what else McGeady said when we called to inquire about spring's big pollen blast: Where's all this pollen coming from?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I seem to be allergic to latex, as I get a rash whenever I put on dishwashing gloves - but I want to paint my living room. Are there other environmentally safe options to latex paint? - K A: I am very sorry you have to deal with this. Allergic responses to latex products aren't unusual, but they can range from a very serious reaction to an irritating rash. If you suspect you're allergic to latex, you should visit a doctor. The good news - as far as your living room goes - is that what we've been calling "latex" paint hasn't had real latex in it for a long time.
LIVING
September 2, 1994 | By Ro Logrippo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Caution! Children's bedrooms can be hazardous to their health. As ridiculous as that may sound, the message is no laughing matter to millions of kids with allergies or asthma linked to their indoor environment. For them, dust, dander, smoke and other common substances provoke respiratory ailments. Their coughs, sneezes, wheezes and, in some cases, gasps for breath are not only irritating but at times debilitating, causing more school absence than any other illness. Some children with asthma outgrow it when their airways reach adult size, but the condition may recur.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Earl S. Vollmer, 83, an old-fashioned family doctor who practiced in Glenside for 54 years and founded several allergy clinics in the area, died Wednesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. He lived in Rydal, Montgomery County. Dr. Vollmer opened his practice in Glenside in 1935, the same year he joined the staff of Abington Memorial. In the years that followed, he treated patients with ardent interest and old-school style. Medicine was Dr. Vollmer's 54-year love. "He was not afraid to go out and make house calls at night," said his son, Earl Jr. "Out into the night he would go - at the bat of a hat. And his practice was not the carriage trade; his practice was serving the public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I seem to be allergic to latex, as I get a rash whenever I put on dishwashing gloves - but I want to paint my living room. Are there other environmentally safe options to latex paint? - K A: I am very sorry you have to deal with this. Allergic responses to latex products aren't unusual, but they can range from a very serious reaction to an irritating rash. If you suspect you're allergic to latex, you should visit a doctor. The good news - as far as your living room goes - is that what we've been calling "latex" paint hasn't had real latex in it for a long time.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Aaaaa-choo! At least a quarter of the U.S. population has allergies. Billions of dollars are spent on treatment and lost workdays. Sufferers often endure agonies of sneezing, runny noses, itchy eyes, coughing, and other symptoms. These reactions can be brought on any time of year by dogs, cats, molds, cockroaches, dust mites, and much, much more, alas. In summer, grasses can be a major culprit. In fall, weeds. Right now, we're in the season of tree pollen. Keep the tissues handy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My mother and I have been at odds for the last five years about her cats. My now 11-year-old son has allergies to cats, his eyes swell shut, and he becomes incredibly congested. He was 1 when he was diagnosed. My mother had no cats then, and never seemed to want one. Now she has two. My family lives 1,000 miles away, and before the cats, we would visit regularly. About four years ago, we visited, but my son became very sick due to his allergy, and we had to leave early.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burton Zweiman, 82, of Haverford, longtime chair of the allergy and immunology division at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died Tuesday, Dec. 24, at his home. The death, possibly from heart failure, was sudden for Dr. Zweiman, who had remained active in personal and professional affairs, said his daughter Amy Harwood. Dr. Zweiman, formerly of Wynnewood, served as president of the American Academy of Asthma and Immunology, chairman of the American Board of Allergy and Immunology, and editor of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a painful past marked by time in Nazi labor and concentration camps, relatives said, Peter Siegler's warm and humorous personality never hardened. Dr. Siegler, 89, of Haverford, died Wednesday, June 5, of heart disease at his Naples, Fla., townhouse. The Hungarian native's first impression of America came in 1945, when he was starving and sick after spending about six months in a concentration camp in Austria during his 20s. He was liberated by soldiers, and when he asked for a smoke, a GI handed him not just one cigarette but a pack of Camels.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
By Dr. Christopher C. Chang, a pediatric allergist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Alfred I. du Pont Hospital for Children, in Wilmington.   Children born outside the United States have significantly lower odds of developing allergic disorders, including asthma, eczema, hay fever, and food allergies, researchers reported recently. Their study, in JAMA Pediatrics, also found that kids born outside the U.S. who have lived here longer than 10 years had significantly higher odds of developing any allergic disorders, including eczema and hay fever, than those who resided here for only 0 to 2 years.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Parents are reporting more skin and food allergies in their children, a government survey found. Experts are not sure what is behind the increase. Could it be that children are growing up in households so clean that it leaves them more sensitive to things that can trigger allergies? Or are mom and dad paying closer attention? "We don't really have the answer," said Lara Akinbami of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the senior author of the report released Thursday.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
New hope for allergy sufferers For those with allergies and asthma, a new under-the-tongue treatment to desensitize the immune system to allergens may hold promise, finds a review of 63 studies in last week's Journal of the American Medical Association. Used in Europe and Asia, sublingual immunotherapy administers traditional treatments, usually given as shots, in the form of pills or drops that dissolve under the tongue. The idea is the same: Expose the immune system to extracts of substances causing an allergy until it builds tolerance.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
By Terri Faye Brown-Whitehorn In a typical classroom of 20 children, one is likely to have a food allergy that could cause a severe reaction. And one in six children with a food allergy will have his or her first allergic reaction at school. Despite growing awareness of food allergies, tragedies continue to occur. Earlier this year, a Virginia 7-year-old, Ammaria Johnson, ate a peanut at recess and died from a severe allergic reaction. Epinephrine, a medication that may have been able to save Ammaria's life, was not available at her school.
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