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Allman Brothers Band

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine bands, two stages, no waiting. So it didn't have the cutting-edge cachet of Lollapalooza or the familial air of the Philadelphia Folk Festival. And there was no attempt to create an era-defining experience a la Woodstock. But Sunday's HORDE (Horizons of Rock Developing Everywhere) Festival - a traveling gypsy caravan of jam-happy musicians and neo-hippy hucksters - featured full sets by Allman Brothers Band and Blues Traveler, and truncated sets by Big Head Todd and the Monsters, the Screaming Cheetah Wheelies, God Street Wine, Rusted Root and others.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Standing side by side, Dickie Betts and Warren Haynes traded guitar runs at the Spectrum last night. It was vintage Allman Brothers Band, with a trace of new flair. Betts represented the old school: Macon, Ga., the Fillmore East and Duane Allman. Haynes, who played on Betts' solo album, was the link to the present - and the possible future - of the Allman Brothers Band, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary on this tour. The two wailed, going back and forth for solos, then combined for some nimble-fingered harmony parts on all-out versions of "Southbound" and "Jessica.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years ago next Tuesday, the wailing stopped. Duane Allman, driving force behind the bluesy Southern rock band the Allman Brothers and an emerging rock icon of the '70s, lost control of his motorcycle on a Macon, Ga., street and was killed. So the wailing stopped, along with the whining, the crying, the squealing and the whimpering that the 24-year-old Allman could wring out of a Les Paul guitar. Rock fans, braced for a spate of million-selling albums from the Allman Brothers, took it hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
When Gregg Allman arrived in Florida on May 22 to plan a summer tour with what's left of the Allman Brothers Band, he couldn't help being taken aback by the fact that it was 20 years ago to the day that he'd arrived in Jacksonville to join his older brother Duane's new band. "My brother had sent me a plane ticket," recalls Allman, who was living in California, "and told me to get my hide to Jacksonville. I was broke, so I put the ticket in my pocket and stuck out my thumb.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were guitar gods of the highest order, and Duane Allman and Stevie Ray Vaughan each revitalized American music in his own way before dying far too young. Two new releases - the seven-CD Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective and the two-CD, 30th-anniversary reissue of Vaughan's Texas Flood - remind us of their enduring brilliance and power. Duane Allman is best-known as the founder of the Allman Brothers Band, the group that pretty much invented and then transcended Southern rock with its adventurous amalgam of rock, blues, country, jazz, and soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Gov't Mule has such a massive catalog of songs that front man Warren Haynes says it's unlikely the band will repeat any of them during its two-night run at the Tower Theater. In fact, he says, it's possible that none of the songs played in Philly will even make their way to New York's Beacon Theatre for the quartet's two-night stand there. "It's literally hundreds of songs," the soft-spoken guitarist and singer said. "We usually go for three hours or so. It ends up being a long night, but you're pleasantly exhausted at the end of it. " Based on the fact that Haynes is a full-time member of both Gov't Mule and the Allman Brothers Band - and has a solo career - you'd expect him to be, uh, pleasantly exhausted offstage, too. But the musician, 52, whose controlled intensity nabbed him the No. 23 spot on Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists" list, says he is quite energized by his musical path.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1986 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press and United Press International contributed to this report.)
Alice Walker, the sharecropper's daughter whose novel The Color Purple won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, returned to her home town of Eatonton, Ga., over the weekend for the local premiere of the movie based on the book. As a child in the central Georgia farming community, Walker was relegated along with other blacks to the balcony seats at the town's only theater, the Pex. But on Saturday, limousines ferried her relatives to the Pex, and residents literally rolled out the red carpet for her at the theater entrance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
New musical beginnings with old references today. DECEMBERISTS IN JANUARY: Portland, Ore.-based Colin Meloy hasn't totally shaken off his devotion to all things "Olde English. " On his new long player leading The Decemberists, "The King Is Dead" (EMI, A) , Colin still leads with a sea-shanty ("Don't Carry It All") boasting imagery of a vessel "pitching hard to starboard. " Then a few songs later, he evokes many a tragic miner's lot on "Rox In the Box. " But unlike high concept Decemberists' albums of yore, the underlying messages here - of carrying on and enduring life's travails - are meant to be taken in a current context.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | by Bruce Britt, Los Angeles Daily News
As its name implies, Bloodline is a band with blues genes. Made up of the progeny of such blues-rock and jazz legends as Miles Davis, Doors guitarist Robbie Kreiger and the late Allman Brothers bassist, Berry Oakley, the centerpiece is a 15-year-old guitar wunkerkind named Smokin' Joe Bonamassa. Some might assume such regal lineage would give Bloodline a tremendous advantage in today's connection-oriented music industry. Indeed, the band's members admit their family ties have helped: "They say you have to have an edge or a gimmick to make it in music, and the family thing definitely makes us different," said Berry Oakley Jr. But Oakley, drummer Erin Davis and guitarist Waylon Kreiger claim some people initially view the band - which includes keyboardist Lou Segreti - as a novelty act. "At first we got some people saying 'you kids just got lucky because of your fathers,' " Oakley recalled.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Susan Tedeschi, whose heart-to-heart vocals range from tender to tough love in ways that leave her Tedeschi Trucks Band fans shaken and stirred, concedes that, yes, that's her in the Facebook photo, all dressed up, holding her Fender guitar in one hand and doing laundry with the other. Her face is as intense about getting those clothes into the dryer one-handed as it is when her voice is wringing every ounce of scorn out of "I Pity the Fool," every ounce of tender longing out of "Always," and every street-tough blues chop out of that Fender.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
WARREN Haynes didn't pick up a violin and pursue a career in classical music. He chose the electric guitar and the path of jam-band rock and southern-fried blues. He wound up working the world's stages with his own group, Gov't Mule, and also filling the very big shoes of guitar legends Jerry Garcia and Duane Allman in later iterations of the Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band. But now this busy guy says he's thrilled and delighted to be part of a push by warm-weather music venues, like the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, to broaden their core subscription audience beyond the traditionally "classical music" program with more populist productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were guitar gods of the highest order, and Duane Allman and Stevie Ray Vaughan each revitalized American music in his own way before dying far too young. Two new releases - the seven-CD Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective and the two-CD, 30th-anniversary reissue of Vaughan's Texas Flood - remind us of their enduring brilliance and power. Duane Allman is best-known as the founder of the Allman Brothers Band, the group that pretty much invented and then transcended Southern rock with its adventurous amalgam of rock, blues, country, jazz, and soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Gov't Mule has such a massive catalog of songs that front man Warren Haynes says it's unlikely the band will repeat any of them during its two-night run at the Tower Theater. In fact, he says, it's possible that none of the songs played in Philly will even make their way to New York's Beacon Theatre for the quartet's two-night stand there. "It's literally hundreds of songs," the soft-spoken guitarist and singer said. "We usually go for three hours or so. It ends up being a long night, but you're pleasantly exhausted at the end of it. " Based on the fact that Haynes is a full-time member of both Gov't Mule and the Allman Brothers Band - and has a solo career - you'd expect him to be, uh, pleasantly exhausted offstage, too. But the musician, 52, whose controlled intensity nabbed him the No. 23 spot on Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists" list, says he is quite energized by his musical path.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
New musical beginnings with old references today. DECEMBERISTS IN JANUARY: Portland, Ore.-based Colin Meloy hasn't totally shaken off his devotion to all things "Olde English. " On his new long player leading The Decemberists, "The King Is Dead" (EMI, A) , Colin still leads with a sea-shanty ("Don't Carry It All") boasting imagery of a vessel "pitching hard to starboard. " Then a few songs later, he evokes many a tragic miner's lot on "Rox In the Box. " But unlike high concept Decemberists' albums of yore, the underlying messages here - of carrying on and enduring life's travails - are meant to be taken in a current context.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IF YOU'RE AN average Joe and you're caught soliciting a prostitute, you may get arrested, the prostitute may get arrested, the pimp (or madam) may get arrested and, depending on the circumstances and the local laws, all of you may end up in jail. If, however, you're the law-and-order governor of New York and you're caught paying thousands of dollars to a prostitute, you get a prime-time talk show on CNN. If Lady Justice is blind it could be because some well-connected politician has tied her wrists to the bedpost and put a bag over her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine bands, two stages, no waiting. So it didn't have the cutting-edge cachet of Lollapalooza or the familial air of the Philadelphia Folk Festival. And there was no attempt to create an era-defining experience a la Woodstock. But Sunday's HORDE (Horizons of Rock Developing Everywhere) Festival - a traveling gypsy caravan of jam-happy musicians and neo-hippy hucksters - featured full sets by Allman Brothers Band and Blues Traveler, and truncated sets by Big Head Todd and the Monsters, the Screaming Cheetah Wheelies, God Street Wine, Rusted Root and others.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | by Bruce Britt, Los Angeles Daily News
As its name implies, Bloodline is a band with blues genes. Made up of the progeny of such blues-rock and jazz legends as Miles Davis, Doors guitarist Robbie Kreiger and the late Allman Brothers bassist, Berry Oakley, the centerpiece is a 15-year-old guitar wunkerkind named Smokin' Joe Bonamassa. Some might assume such regal lineage would give Bloodline a tremendous advantage in today's connection-oriented music industry. Indeed, the band's members admit their family ties have helped: "They say you have to have an edge or a gimmick to make it in music, and the family thing definitely makes us different," said Berry Oakley Jr. But Oakley, drummer Erin Davis and guitarist Waylon Kreiger claim some people initially view the band - which includes keyboardist Lou Segreti - as a novelty act. "At first we got some people saying 'you kids just got lucky because of your fathers,' " Oakley recalled.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years ago next Tuesday, the wailing stopped. Duane Allman, driving force behind the bluesy Southern rock band the Allman Brothers and an emerging rock icon of the '70s, lost control of his motorcycle on a Macon, Ga., street and was killed. So the wailing stopped, along with the whining, the crying, the squealing and the whimpering that the 24-year-old Allman could wring out of a Les Paul guitar. Rock fans, braced for a spate of million-selling albums from the Allman Brothers, took it hard.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
It was as if the '80s never happened. The Allman Brothers Band, rock-and- roll's Rip van Winkles, roared into the Mann Music Center on Tuesday with an evening of Southern blues and boogie that proved you don't have to pay heed to fashion to have a lot of style. The band, which reunited for a 20th-anniversary tour last summer, is touring to help promote Seven Turns (Epic), their first album of new material in nine years. For 2 1/2 hours, the Allmans showcased their rediscovered creative momentum with a dignity and ease that's rarely found in contemporary rock halls.
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