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Alphabet

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NEWS
June 19, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
They are the alphabet soup of city government: PAID, PIDC, PMA, PFMC, PHDC, RDA, PLC and many more. These non-profit corporations and authorities are the shadow government of Philadelphia. Their advocates say these agencies cut red tape and creatively finance important projects. But they also operate in virtual secrecy, frustrating attempts by the news media and the city controller to find out who they hire and how they spend their money. The state Senate's intergovernmental affairs committee yesterday held a hearing on the Philadelphia Gas Works and its management agency, Philadelphia Facilities Management Corp.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
If I went to South Korea I would have a heck of a time reading their street signs. What's wrong with permitting those who live in Philadelphia but whose alphabet is different from ours to write "Olney" in their own alphabet? It might even help them read the English signs. Edward Harrison Bernstein Bala Cynwd.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Once Upon a Shoe, a children's play by Joseph Robinette, will be performed at 11 a.m. Saturday at Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley. The show is presented by the Hedgerow's Advanced Teenage Acting Class as part of the theater's Saturday morning children's performances. The theater is at 64 Rose Valley Rd. Tickets are $5. For information, call 610-565-4211. The Emperor's New Clothes will be performed on Saturday and Sunday by the Marple Newtown Players Children's Theater.
SPORTS
April 17, 2002 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Ring magazine, long known as the Bible of Boxing, is seeking once again to have the last word on professional boxing champions. With three major sanctioning bodies awarding their own title belts, the meaning of world champion no longer carries the significance it once did. The Ring, an 80-year-old publication with editorial offices near Ambler, intends to remedy that by recognizing one champion in each division. For more than 50 years, the magazine's titleholders were the champions of record.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Howard Benjamin Benzenhafer, an ambulance driver and former Philadelphia firefighter, was shot to death Saturday morning in West Kensington. He was 44 and lived in Southwest Philadelphia. Benzenhafer was killed during an apparent drug deal that went sour, said his brother, Charles Benzenhafer. No one had been arrested. Benzenhafer became a Philadelphia firefighter in 1978, but lost his job a dozen years later because of his drug addiction, said his brother. Drug-treatment centers over the years helped curb his drug use. As an ambulance driver, he rarely missed a day of work, said his brother.
NEWS
January 13, 2003
GUYS - you blew it again. I love the Eagles as much as anyone (my 2 1/2-year-old daughter learned to chant E-A-G-L-E-S before she learned the whole alphabet). That said, with the Falcons-Packers game covered on the back page, you should have devoted the front cover to the death of Detective Anthony Johnson. The man is a hero who died going beyond the call of duty to help our city's children. As much as I love McNabb and the rest of the Eagles, Detective Johnson seems to have been the kind of role model who does not get enough coverage in the press.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
West Conshohocken's council president testified at his drunken-driving trial yesterday that he refused to take breath-alcohol tests Dec. 3 because he believed he was being set up by the police. "I believed I couldn't get a fair test . . . from the police departments involved," John T. Lawless said in Montgomery County Court. ". . . I didn't trust the machine. I didn't trust what was going on. I was afraid. " Lawless testified that when he was stopped by West Conshohocken Officer Steven Walker and asked to breathe into a portable breath-alcohol sensor, he refused.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
For children learning to read, an "A" could stand for anything from an apple to an armadillo. In an exhibition that kicks off today, Beaver College in Glenside is devoting a month to the study of various artistic interpretations of the alphabet. Entitled Artist's ABCs, Artistic Interpretations of the Alphabet, the exhibit will display original art work from award-winning children's ABC books. On display are the works of 13 artists, photographers, writers and illustrators. Works by Caldecott winners such as Leonard Baskin, Marcia Brown, Diane and Leo Dillon, Rachel Isadora and Alice and Martin Provensen and others will be on display in the Beaver College Art Gallery until Nov. 21. Caldecott Awards are the most prestigious awards given for children's book illustrations.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
West Conshohocken's council president was convicted of drunken driving yesterday after four days of testimony and five hours of deliberation by a Montgomery County Court jury. "My story still hasn't been told," John T. Lawless said after the jury rendered its verdict. He said later that he was referring to the fact that Judge Albert R. Subers did not allow him to testify on the political climate in the borough and on his problems with the police department. Lawless, 52, had testified that he was an outspoken advocate of reducing the department's budget and staffing.
SPORTS
March 24, 2013
Regardless of how you might be feeling right now about the Flyers as a hockey team, you've got to admit that their charitable arm is a winner, giving more than $700,000 annually to great causes like Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philabundance and the Ed Snider Youth Hockey Foundation, among others. Along with big marquee fundraisers, the Comcast-Spectacor Charities ( fondly known as the Flyers Charities) also run a little souvenir kiosk at Flyers games. Look for it outside the Cure Club bar area in section 116. Items for sale include Hartnell Down T-shirts and caps (including Wayne Simmonds "Wayne Train" gear)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2014
R OE GALLO, 50, of South Philadelphia, owns Alphabet Academy, which operates four day-care centers on East Passyunk Avenue. The Treehouse, near 11th Street, is green, eco-friendly and also teaches about civic engagement. A second green day care for toddlers is slated to open in September. Q: What was the genesis of the Treehouse? A: Alphabet Academy started in 1998. As we grew, [Treehouse initially] became our pre-K. We bought and renovated this building [near Dickinson Street]
SPORTS
January 26, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
IF ANYONE at Bishop McDevitt was unclear as to what exactly La Salle's Shawn Witherspoon enjoys on the basketball court, the 6-2 junior guard stretched his lungs yesterday to eliminate any confusion. Witherspoon crouched low in a defensive posture as McDevitt star Tyrell Long, a 6-5 forward, approached with the ball. After a few herky-jerky moves by Long, Witherspoon held his ground and forced the big man to pick up the ball. "I love it! I love it!" Witherspoon growled. Long was forced to pass the ball, and the play eventually resulted in a McDevitt turnover.
SPORTS
March 24, 2013
Regardless of how you might be feeling right now about the Flyers as a hockey team, you've got to admit that their charitable arm is a winner, giving more than $700,000 annually to great causes like Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philabundance and the Ed Snider Youth Hockey Foundation, among others. Along with big marquee fundraisers, the Comcast-Spectacor Charities ( fondly known as the Flyers Charities) also run a little souvenir kiosk at Flyers games. Look for it outside the Cure Club bar area in section 116. Items for sale include Hartnell Down T-shirts and caps (including Wayne Simmonds "Wayne Train" gear)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if you became sick - violently, seriously ill - everytime your children uttered a word? That's the nightmare world unleashed by Ben Marcus in his stunner of a novel The Flame Alphabet (Alfred A. Knopf, $25.95), due out Tuesday. The novel tells the story of Sam and Claire, an ordinary Jewish couple from Rochester, N.Y., who realize to their horror that the mysterious illness that has gripped them is caused by their daughter, Esther. Or, rather, by her words.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
RE FATIMAH Ali's column on Dr. Laura and the n-word: We all know this won't be the last time white folks will use the n-word (openly or discreetly). What we need to do as a race is stop giving them this word to use. But this won't happen until we take the time to educate the ignorant. The greatest of all riches in the universe is the golden knowledge of self. The destiny of a people is determined by their image of themselves. Jahi Osayande, Philadelphia Fight the crime, Mike!
NEWS
August 30, 2010
THE CARL GREENE saga promises to remain riveting for some time, especially as the PHA board and HUD undertake their independent investigations. But the reality is, Carl Greene is just a sideshow in this circus. The main event is how the structure of the agency contributed to its problems, and that structure begins and ends with its board of commissioners. The troubles at PHA - including the settlement of three sexual harassment claims, with a fourth pending - without the knowledge of any of the five board members is certainly an indictment of a board that has been insulated from reality, and from the actions of its executive director.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2010 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Pasta has been very, very good for the financial health of Philadelphia Macaroni Co. So good that Campbell Soup Co. , a longtime customer, said it agreed to sell an Ohio pasta factory to the family-owned Philadelphia Macaroni. Terms of the transaction, which is expected to close in mid-July, were not disclosed. But Philadelphia Macaroni, which has pasta factories in Warminster; Grand Forks, N.D.; and Spokane, Wash., doesn't intend to operate the German Village Products plant in Wauseon, Ohio.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Christopher Paslay
Two words, both 14 letters long and beginning with the letter A, have become quite trendy in the world of public education. The first is accountability, and the second is accommodations. Accountability is used mainly by superintendents and politicians who want to show the public they mean business. Addressing the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce last year, President Obama called for a "new culture of accountability" when it comes to America's teachers and schools. In an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal the next month, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrote, "We need a culture of accountability in America's education system if we want to be the best in the world.
FOOD
February 12, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Jayson Grossberg has revived Alphabet Soup, his BYOB in Audubon, Camden County. Mindful of the economy, Grossberg is calling it Alphabet Soup Cafe (34 W. Merchant St., 856-310-0605), and he's pricing the menu to encourage people to eat there more frequently. Sort of what he did for a spell in the kitchen at the now-closed 707, near Washington Square. "Instead of butter-poached lobster, I'm doing lobster rolls," he explains, adding that he'll favor sustainable/organics. (With 48 hours' notice, though, he'll do up one of his old tasting menus.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art will host the Every Family Party on Saturday for caregivers and children ages 2-11. The party, formerly known as the Enchanted Forest Family Party, will celebrate the museum's first children's book. Titled A Is for Art Museum, the book takes preschoolers on an alphabetical tour of the museum's collections. Kids can enjoy alphabet-themed attractions and activities, including 15 art stations on the museum's ground and first floors celebrating works of art in the book.
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