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Alternative Education

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NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
An alternative education program that keeps potential drop-outs, pregnant teens, drug users and problem kids in school has been saved - at least temporarily - from the budget ax of the Wissahickon school board. After much discussion Monday night, board directors agreed to ask five neighboring school districts to pay full tuition costs for their students who participate in the program. The district houses the program at Wissahickon High School and pays the salaries of the program's three part-time teachers.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A Bala Cynwyd alternative-education company under federal investigation has been warned it could lose its approval for a disciplinary school in Reading because it allegedly is not complying with state and federal laws. The Pennsylvania Department of Education has told the for-profit Delaware Valley High School it has begun proceedings to revoke its approval because the school did not provide required academic and counseling programs and failed to address violent incidents that endanger students and staff.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Education Law Center of Pennsylvania is expected to ask the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday to conduct a civil rights investigation into the placement of Pennsylvania students in state-funded alternative-education programs. The complaint being lodged with the civil rights division alleges that school districts across the state are removing a disproportionately high number of African American students and those with special needs from their regular schools and placing them in "educationally inferior" alternative-education programs, including disciplinary schools.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time, the Philadelphia School District is offering an alternative education program for students in the primary grades, announcing yesterday that behavioral services will be offered to violent and disruptive third and fourth graders. The district has several alternative placement programs for students from fifth through 12th grades, but the service is now authorized for students as young as 8 and 9 years old. "This is brand new for the district," Gwen Morris, the district's executive director of transitional and alternative education, told the Philadelphia School Reform Commission.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Reading School District is cutting its ties with an embattled alternative-education firm in Bala Cynwyd. Reading's school board voted unanimously Wednesday night to terminate a $1.1 million contract with Delaware Valley High School to operate a disciplinary school for troubled students as of Feb. 6. "We are acting in the best interest of our students," the district said in a statement Thursday. "We have a transition plan in place for our alternative education services, and that will be communicated to our parents and students.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The North Penn and Souderton Area School Districts sit side by side in eastern Montgomery County. Their students are mostly middle and upper-middle class. Both districts have paid millions in contract and transportation costs in the last decade to send their violent, their troubled, their disruptive students outside district boundaries for alternative-education programs, sometimes to Philadelphia or as far as Lehigh County. But when each began planning for local alternative education - to begin this September - their paths diverged.
NEWS
June 18, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District is poised to expand programs that deal with dropouts or students in danger of dropping out while it reduces the number of spots for students with discipline problems. If a recommendation made to the School Reform Commission yesterday is approved next week, the district will more than double the seats in its alternative-education program, from 1,275 to 2,755 next year, and cut the number of disciplinary seats by nearly a third, from 3,150 to 2,240.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former employee of an embattled alternative-education company has denied the owner's allegations that he and five other former staffers tried to incite students to commit violence at a campus in Reading last month. Andre Bean, the former regional director of Delaware Valley High School and former director of the for-profit company's site in Reading, said David T. Shulick's claims in court documents last month were false, "ridiculous," "wild," and "defamatory. " "We have not contacted any current or former students of DVHS Reading," Bean said in a filing in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Friday.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Without a $216 million cash infusion, the Philadelphia School District faces yet another unthinkable situation in September - class sizes as big as 41, layoffs of more than 1,000 employees, and further cuts to special education services, nurses, and other basics already in short supply. "Short of that $216 million, our schools will go from insufficient to empty shells that do not represent what I consider a functioning school," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said at a grim Friday news conference introducing the district's 2014-15 budget: a $2.8 billion plan that keeps the status quo. The $216 million is a floor that buys only what the district has right now, Hite said, but he is requesting $440 million to improve the schools' bare-bones conditions.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE U.S. Department of Justice has launched a civil-rights investigation into the Pennsylvania Department of Education's program for disruptive students, the Daily News has learned. The probe was prompted by a complaint last August from the Center City nonprofit Education Law Center alleging that the statewide Alternative Education for Disruptive Youth (AEDY) program had a disproportionate number of African-American students and students with disabilities. Deborah Gordon Klehr, a senior staff attorney with the law center, said that as a result of state policies, "school districts across Pennsylvania are discriminating . . . through the misuse of the AEDY program.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 29, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester High School freshman Jameisha Johnson is the first to admit that school was not working for her. She struggled academically, had serious behavioral issues, and was placed in an alternative-school program. Then two Widener University professors and their cadre of student tutors stepped in with a pilot program aimed at increasing literacy for at-risk students, simultaneously providing hands-on experiences for their education majors. "My grades went up. My behavior improved.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Without a $216 million cash infusion, the Philadelphia School District faces yet another unthinkable situation in September - class sizes as big as 41, layoffs of more than 1,000 employees, and further cuts to special education services, nurses, and other basics already in short supply. "Short of that $216 million, our schools will go from insufficient to empty shells that do not represent what I consider a functioning school," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said at a grim Friday news conference introducing the district's 2014-15 budget: a $2.8 billion plan that keeps the status quo. The $216 million is a floor that buys only what the district has right now, Hite said, but he is requesting $440 million to improve the schools' bare-bones conditions.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE U.S. Department of Justice has launched a civil-rights investigation into the Pennsylvania Department of Education's program for disruptive students, the Daily News has learned. The probe was prompted by a complaint last August from the Center City nonprofit Education Law Center alleging that the statewide Alternative Education for Disruptive Youth (AEDY) program had a disproportionate number of African-American students and students with disabilities. Deborah Gordon Klehr, a senior staff attorney with the law center, said that as a result of state policies, "school districts across Pennsylvania are discriminating . . . through the misuse of the AEDY program.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Education Law Center of Pennsylvania is expected to ask the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday to conduct a civil rights investigation into the placement of Pennsylvania students in state-funded alternative-education programs. The complaint being lodged with the civil rights division alleges that school districts across the state are removing a disproportionately high number of African American students and those with special needs from their regular schools and placing them in "educationally inferior" alternative-education programs, including disciplinary schools.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
By Raymond Lamboy Gov. Christie has set the stage, and Mayor Dana L. Redd has cleared the path for a grand experiment in urban public education that will unfold in Camden. As with every well-thought-out experiment, a thesis or hypothesis statement is presented to measure success or failure. In this instance, the thesis seems to be this: The introduction and expansion of alternative-education models will lead to a functioning education system that will provide the children of Camden with an education on par with their suburban neighbors and will result in greatly increased student achievement.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Education is investigating a Bala Cynwyd company's alternative-education program in Bucks County after finding a series of problems in the company's program in Reading. Department spokesman Timothy Eller confirmed Tuesday that state authorities were gathering and examining information about Delaware Valley High School's operations in Warminster. The program serves students with academic and disciplinary problems from school districts in Bucks and Montgomery Counties.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Reading School District is cutting its ties with an embattled alternative-education firm in Bala Cynwyd. Reading's school board voted unanimously Wednesday night to terminate a $1.1 million contract with Delaware Valley High School to operate a disciplinary school for troubled students as of Feb. 6. "We are acting in the best interest of our students," the district said in a statement Thursday. "We have a transition plan in place for our alternative education services, and that will be communicated to our parents and students.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
An embattled alternative education firm in Bala Cynwyd has denied state allegations that its disciplinary school in Reading is not complying with state and federal laws. Lawyer David T. Shulick, owner of Delaware Valley High School, sent documents to the Pennsylvania Department of Education last week that he said refute the department's contention that the Reading school's approval should be revoked because it does not provide required academic and counseling programs, and failed to address violence.
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