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Alternative Energy

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NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The time is now ripe for cogeneration, an alternative energy source, according to a feasibility study to be completed this week by the Chester County Development Council and a consulting firm. Cogeneration allows areas of concentrated development to operate their own heating plants - and cut their utility bills by a third, according to the study by the Development Council and the Paoli consulting firm Walter A. Smith & Associates. The study was paid for by a $64,000 grant from the Governor's Energy Council.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
By Hal Marcovitz When I converted my Bucks County home to solar power in 2009, I was delighted to learn that utilities in Pennsylvania and elsewhere would pay me for the right to claim the energy produced on my roof as their own. Last year, I earned more than $1,600 selling what are known as alternative-energy credits. Pennsylvania and other states require utilities to generate a portion of their energy from renewable resources such as sun and wind. Since utilities in the Northeast generally don't maintain large solar or wind farms - as their counterparts in places like Arizona and New Mexico do - they satisfy the requirements by claiming ownership of power produced by rooftop systems.
NEWS
March 25, 2009 | By Wallace Nunn
What if there were a way to do the following? Create high-paying jobs in Pennsylvania. Increase demand for a commodity that is abundant in Pennsylvania. Reduce the national debt. Reduce the income of dictators in the Middle East and Venezuela. Decrease tensions among nations vying for a scarce resource. And help the environment. This may be the rare case in which something that sounds too good to be true isn't. Gov. Rendell and the legislature should consider using federal stimulus money, some of which is targeted to alternative energy projects, to switch the state's fleet of diesel-fuel vehicles to compressed natural gas. Every vehicle we run on compressed natural gas is a vehicle that is not run on imported oil. Instead, we would be using a fuel that is produced by American companies paying American taxes and employing American workers making a living wage that could help them pay their mortgages.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rebate program that Gov. Rendell hoped would entice Pennsylvanians to convert to solar energy is proving particularly popular with businesses - just as the state's primary business-advocacy group is ramping up its campaign against a legislative proposal that would require greater use of alternative energy. The Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry acknowledges that House Bill 80's increased requirements for the use of solar and wind energy would create clean-energy jobs.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | By Susan Q. Stranahan and Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Perched behind the new Process Development Unit building, carved into a raw, red hillside here, is a tall cylindrical tank, securely enclosed with a chain-link fence topped with barbed wire. "The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms requires that," explains Brian W. Duff, nodding toward the enclosure. With good reason. The tank contains 100-proof ethanol - pretty heady stuff - made in the Process Development Unit, where Duff is the senior engineer. One day, if all goes according to plan, the output from this $14 million plant, with its maze of pipes and fermentation vats, will go into a different type of tank: automobile gas tanks.
NEWS
November 14, 2008 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oil prices are up to $145 a barrel. No, they're down to $55. The roller-coaster ride may be making U.S. drivers happy - or at least saving them some of the extra money they spent going to work and on vacation this summer. But coupled with the credit drought, it's enough to give the alternative-energy industry vertigo. Or worse. At least 10 U.S. ethanol producers reportedly have filed for bankruptcy in recent months, including VeraSun Energy Corp. of Sioux Falls, S.D., a billion-dollar business.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the controversy persists over a Pennsylvania legislative proposal to increase requirements for alternative-energy use, a major opponent of the measure - the state Chamber of Business and Industry - is launching what it hopes is a viable alternative. Its goal is to create a market for a variety of clean-energy options - without government mandates. "We're going to need wind, solar, natural gas to move forward" as companies increasingly embrace more sustainable ways of doing business, acknowledged Gene Barr, the chamber's vice president of government and public affairs.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun has not yet officially set on this year's legislative session in Harrisburg, but it has on an effort to increase the state requirement for use of solar power. "For all practical purposes, it's dead," Maureen Mulligan, lobbyist for Pennsylvania's two largest solar-advocacy groups, declared in an e-mail Monday. It's the third time in two years that a legislative proposal to boost the state's commitment to alternative energy has failed to even reach a vote in the full House or Senate.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the solar industry in Pennsylvania, Wednesday is a day of envy. At 10 a.m., Delaware Gov. Jack Markell is to sign a legislative measure boosting his state's commitment to alternative energy, including a promise to get 3.5 percent of its electricity from the sun by 2025. It is the sort of event solar installers had hoped to be celebrating by now - in Pennsylvania. Those ambitions fizzled, however, when the legislature recessed right after passing the state budget on July 3, effectively killing any chance this year for adoption of the long-debated House Bill 2405.
NEWS
October 9, 2007 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
For months, lobbyists for everyone from small-town Pennsylvania farmers to multibillion-dollar oil companies have swarmed the Capitol, jockeying for the best seat at the table to exert influence on Gov. Rendell's alternative energy legislation. Some are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on lobbying to make sure they are heard. It is a stark reminder that the fight over the future of alternative energy is not just a legislative brawl between Republicans and Democrats.
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NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Matthew Daly, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, who oversaw a moratorium on offshore drilling after the BP oil spill and promoted alternative energy sources throughout the nation, will step down in March. A former U.S. senator from Colorado, Salazar ran the Interior Department throughout President Obama's first term and pushed renewable power such as solar and wind and the settlement of a long-standing dispute with American Indians. With Environmental Protection Agency chief Lisa Jackson also leaving the administration and Energy Secretary Steven Chu expected to depart, Obama will have a clean slate of top officials overseeing energy and environmental issues.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
DETROIT - Stan Ovshinsky, the self-taught inventor who developed the nickel-metal hydride battery used in the hybrid vehicle industry, has died at his home in suburban Detroit after a fight with cancer. He was 89. Ovshinsky, who ran Energy Conversion Devices, a car battery development company, also created a machine that produced nine-mile-long sheets of thin solar energy panels intended to bring cheaper, cleaner power to homes and businesses. His son, Harvey Ovshinsky, said his father was passionate about science and alternative energy, but also about civil rights and other social causes.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2012 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - The head of the Japanese utility that owns the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant says last year's meltdowns sapped away money it might have used to switch to alternative energy, making it all the more important for the company to stick with nuclear. Naomi Hirose, president of Tokyo Electric Power Co., said that it was "quite troubling" that the government, responding to public opinion, was moving toward eliminating nuclear power, but he said that Tepco would follow whatever energy policy Japan adopts.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Oskar Garcia, Associated Press
ABOARD THE USS NIMITZ - About 100 nautical miles northeast of Oahu in the Pacific Ocean, a fleet of U.S. Navy fighter jets slings from the deck of the USS Nimitz aircraft carrier, leaving thin trails of smoke on the tight runway. The operation, part of maneuvers involving several thousand sailors as part of the world's largest naval exercises in waters off Hawaii, was at the center of a growing controversy involving defense spending and foreign oil. The dozens of air and sea vessels surrounding the Nimitz - including helicopters, fighter jets and destroyers - were running on a biofuel blend that can be substituted for traditional fuel without any engine modifications.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Jackie Calmes, New York Times News Service
WASHINGTON - With gasoline prices high at the pump and on voters' list of complaints, President Obama on Wednesday began a two-day, four-state trip to bring to life what he calls his "all of the above" agenda to foster alternative energy sources as well as oil and gas. Obama hopscotched Wednesday from Nevada, and the desert site of the nation's largest solar photovoltaic power plant, to New Mexico to see oil and gas drilling rigs on federal lands...
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looking back, Swarthmore's leaders are a tad foggy on how the borough came to far outpace other communities in the use of alternative energy. Maybe it stemmed from the borough's long history of environmental activism. Or the nature of a town founded by Quakers that is host to a celebrated liberal-arts college. In any event, Swarthmore has achieved a level of green that most towns would envy. In the last year, more than a quarter of the energy needed to power its homes, buildings, and schools - 27.9 percent - came from renewable sources.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
By Hal Marcovitz When I converted my Bucks County home to solar power in 2009, I was delighted to learn that utilities in Pennsylvania and elsewhere would pay me for the right to claim the energy produced on my roof as their own. Last year, I earned more than $1,600 selling what are known as alternative-energy credits. Pennsylvania and other states require utilities to generate a portion of their energy from renewable resources such as sun and wind. Since utilities in the Northeast generally don't maintain large solar or wind farms - as their counterparts in places like Arizona and New Mexico do - they satisfy the requirements by claiming ownership of power produced by rooftop systems.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
In the state where steel once reigned, where coal was king, and where natural gas is a burning issue, President Obama yesterday came to talk about wind. Visiting a Bucks County wind-turbine manufacturer to tout his alternative-energy plan, Obama also blew a little hot air about Congress and the budget standstill threatening to shut down government. "It makes it tough to win the future when you haven't passed the budget from last year," Obama told the crowd gathered inside Gamesa Technology Corp.'s cavernous factory in Fairless Hills.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Projects to charge electric cars, fuel vehicles that run on natural gas, and promote biofuels received a $7.9 million boost from the state Tuesday. Gov. Rendell announced that amount in state grants for 21 projects, which he said also would create 221 jobs and cut carbon dioxide emissions by 14.5 million pounds. Additional private funds to finish the projects boost their value to $30 million, he said. "These are exciting projects because they pave the way for consumers to adopt these new technologies," Rendell said at a news conference in Harrisburg.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun has not yet officially set on this year's legislative session in Harrisburg, but it has on an effort to increase the state requirement for use of solar power. "For all practical purposes, it's dead," Maureen Mulligan, lobbyist for Pennsylvania's two largest solar-advocacy groups, declared in an e-mail Monday. It's the third time in two years that a legislative proposal to boost the state's commitment to alternative energy has failed to even reach a vote in the full House or Senate.
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