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Alternative Medicine

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NEWS
January 22, 2012
Remembering Herb Clarke Herb Clarke died Jan. 8. He was best known and remembered as the longtime weatherman on WCAU, NBC10, and then for his six years of garden reports on KYW radio. He was also my dad. We moved to Philadelphia when Dad came to work at Channel 10 in November 1958. I was a baby. All three of us Clarke children grew up in Philadelphia. TV is a fickle and sometimes cruel business. On-air talent is often cut or reassigned with little notice. There one day, gone the next.
NEWS
October 2, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former first lady, the subject of an Oscar-winning movie, and a scientist who has studied the effects of pathogens on the human voice are among 12 winners of the 2002 O. Spurgeon English Humanitarian Awards. The award, in its second year, is named after the late chair of the department of psychiatry at Temple University; it honors a group of people who work with different types of alternative medicine. The awards will be presented Saturday after a 6 p.m. banquet at Temple's Diamond Club, 1913 N. Broad St. One of the winners is Sharry Edwards, a pioneer in human bioacoustics, examining the frequencies of different sounds in the human voice.
LIVING
September 28, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, Anne Khoury couldn't drum up enough interest to support her vision for a large consumer-oriented conference on alternative medicine in Philadelphia. Since then, the topic has become so hot that two separate events - each expected to draw 20,000 people - will be staged here this fall. The first, starting Thursday, is the New Health Symposium - an 11-day event modeled after the Book and the Cook. It will use sites throughout the Philadelphia region to feature dozens of authors and speakers on health topics, including Nina Shandler, author of Yoga for Pregnancy and Birth, and Brian Clement, director of the Hippocrates Health Institute in Florida.
NEWS
June 15, 2009 | By Lori Aratani, THE WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON - The prognosis wasn't good for Bilbo. The middle-age pug suffered from a whole host of ailments, including itchy skin, weakness in his back legs, and a loss of appetite. Bilbo's regular veterinarian told his owner, Abe Haspel of Annandale, Va., that there wasn't much to be done. The feisty pug was getting old, and his condition would only continue to deteriorate. But three years later, Bilbo is feistier than ever. Haspel credits monthly acupuncture treatments for the change.
NEWS
July 8, 2007 | By Meredith Broussard FOR THE INQUIRER
Harlow Whitleigh spends her days gazing out the window of her Fishtown townhouse, eating bonbons and lounging with her best friend, a Yorkshire terrier named Rosco. Harlow also barks. A small white bichon frise/poodle hybrid, she barks at cars, at the letter carrier, at birds, at customers coming to nearby Johnny Brenda's tavern, and at anyone walking by on the street. Jeniphur Whitleigh and Michael Pasquarello, who own Harlow and the Loft District's Cafe Lift, have learned to live with Harlow's high-pitched ways.
NEWS
February 5, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lying stock-still in a bed Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, his neck and chin gripped in a rigid plastic collar, 16-year-old Mazeratti Mitchell could barely move his jaw. But the Boothwyn teenager, whose spine was severely injured in a high school wrestling accident Tuesday, smiled faintly as he spoke of the escalating battle between his mother, an herbal healer, and mainstream medicine over his care. "One of the doctors said I needed surgery because I'd be paralyzed the rest of my life if I moved my head just a millimeter," he murmured, then lifted his left arm about three inches and wiggled his fingers.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | By Adam L. Cataldo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The University of Medicine and Dentistry announced yesterday the creation of the first center in New Jersey for the study of alternative medicine. The UMDNJ Center for the Study of Alternative and Complementary Medicine is in Newark. The university also released the results of a survey of New Jersey residents that found a significant use of alternative medicine. "The university is putting a commitment behind putting the best resources that we can into education, practice and research," said Riva E. Touger-Decker, a nutritionist and the center's acting director.
LIVING
January 2, 1995 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can herbs cure warts? Does powdered shark cartilage help cancer? Can music help brain injuries, or acupuncture relieve arthritis? These are questions that most of the conventional medical world would have ridiculed until just recently. Some experts still do. But now they are being seriously investigated and in some cases, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), through its fledgling Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM). Founded in January 1992, the office now has its third director and is searching for a new one. It has been wracked by allegations of political interference, disorganization, ineptitude, and a confused scientific mission.
LIVING
April 8, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After long scorning the benefits of Third-World medicines and folk remedies, American medical schools are offering courses and seminars about them. The doctors of tomorrow are studying ancient treatments such as acupuncture, herbalism, hypnosis and healing touch. They are being told that such "alternative medicine" may not be so alternative after all. "Eighty percent of the world's people rely on what we call 'alternative medicine.' Is that to say they have no medicine at all?"
NEWS
January 3, 1999
TODAY'S ESSAYS About 83 million American adults - more than 4 out of 10 - used some form of alternative medicine last year. In October, President Clinton signed a law creating the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and giving it a $50 million budget. The Journal of the American Medical Association dedicated a special issue to the topic in November. It seems to be, as one doctor calls it, a quiet revolution in medicine. For today's Voices, we invited professionals and patients working with alternative medicine in our region to talk about the trends and what the future holds.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was only 6 p.m., but the stingy winter sun was long gone when a dozen middle-aged men and women arrived at the Penn Medicine outpost in Radnor. They gathered in a wood-paneled conference room and settled into comfortable office chairs arranged in a circle. Ranging from their late 30s to early 60s, most were strangers and professionally had little in common. One was a fund-raiser for a private foundation, another a pharmacist who works with terminally ill children. There also were a couple of psychologists, a lawyer, a banking software consultant, and a few retirees.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
If the Affordable Care Act is widely implemented, many groups will be affected. Here's a sampling.   Mental health People with mental illness may be among those who benefit the most from the law. These include individuals with severe mental illness, who make up about 6 percent of the population, but also those with milder or temporary issues. All new marketplace plans must offer 10 essential health benefits, and mental health is a core area. Future coverage will include such services as counseling and psychotherapy, and insurers must cover them at levels similar to general medical and surgical care.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
Remembering Herb Clarke Herb Clarke died Jan. 8. He was best known and remembered as the longtime weatherman on WCAU, NBC10, and then for his six years of garden reports on KYW radio. He was also my dad. We moved to Philadelphia when Dad came to work at Channel 10 in November 1958. I was a baby. All three of us Clarke children grew up in Philadelphia. TV is a fickle and sometimes cruel business. On-air talent is often cut or reassigned with little notice. There one day, gone the next.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
In May 2005, it seemed like an intriguing match. The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine announced a partnership with the Tai Sophia Institute, a center for complementary and alternative medicine based in Laurel, Md. The collaboration sought to combine Penn's expertise in traditional, evidence-based Western medicine with Tai Sophia's strengths in non-Western therapies such as acupuncture. But resistance on the Penn campus was fierce. Neal Nathanson, a Penn epidemiologist who echoed the views of many, called the collaboration "a return to voodoo medicine" and said in a recent interview that it "put us in bed with an outfit that we didn't support in terms of the principles.
NEWS
February 12, 2011
The case of Mazeratti Mitchell highlights failings on the part of two of our society's most important institutions: hospitals and children's welfare services ("Injury pits traditional vs. alternative medicine," Saturday). Our hospitals could better serve their patients if they would embrace complementary medical treatments, as is done throughout the developed world. The Philadelphia area has many skilled health professionals who first trained as physicians yet choose to practice alternative medicine.
NEWS
February 5, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lying stock-still in a bed Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, his neck and chin gripped in a rigid plastic collar, 16-year-old Mazeratti Mitchell could barely move his jaw. But the Boothwyn teenager, whose spine was severely injured in a high school wrestling accident Tuesday, smiled faintly as he spoke of the escalating battle between his mother, an herbal healer, and mainstream medicine over his care. "One of the doctors said I needed surgery because I'd be paralyzed the rest of my life if I moved my head just a millimeter," he murmured, then lifted his left arm about three inches and wiggled his fingers.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2005, the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine agreed to educate some of its students at the Tai Sophia Institute in Laurel, Md. There, Penn medical and nursing students would be able to earn a master's degree in complementary and alternative medicine. It was Alfred P. Fishman who partnered Penn students with the institute, to teach them acupuncture and botanical healing. At 86, Penn Medicine's director of program development said he had never meditated or attempted yoga.
NEWS
July 19, 2010
Randy Aiken believes his hands are "gifts. " He can turn a wrench with authority. His practical skills are broad. In winter, he delivers fuel oil. He also installs and repairs heating and air-conditioning systems. He is a plumber and electrician. He removes asbestos and inspects buildings for structural soundness. He is a chatty, affable man who is known by his trademark cowboy boots. He is 65 years old, but looks younger. His body is solid and muscular, and he exudes health and vigor.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By FATIMAH ALI
AS Obamacare eventually takes shape, it seems that - given the government's increasing role in this important facet of our lives - self-empowerment will be ever more essential to improving our individual health. We must be well-informed, and develop healthy habits, as well as find alternatives to surgery and pharmaceuticals whenever possible. I always ask my doctors a kazillion questions, especially if they express an interest in removing some part of my body. When a girlfriend confided recently that her fibroid tumors (which are almost always noncancerous)
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