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Alternative School

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NEWS
September 15, 2009 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Taylor Frome looked forward to teaching scores of high-school dropouts who decided to turn over a new leaf this fall by getting their GEDs. But she may not get the chance now that funding for her North Philadelphia alternative school has been cut by the school district, which has canceled or put on hold contracts with alternative-school providers across the city. The district's chief business officer, Michael Masch, blamed the state budget impasse for the funding glitch and said that funding for the accelerated diploma programs likely will be restored pending the outcome from Harrisburg.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | By Peggy L. Salvatore, Special to The Inquirer
A request to permit an alternative day school for troubled teenagers was unanimously approved Monday night by the Middletown Township Zoning Hearing Board. The school, which serves the Neshaminy, Bristol Township, Pennsbury and Morrisville School Districts, will use a room, two bathrooms and an office in the Brethren Church of Fairless Hills on Hoe Road in Highland Park, Levittown, according to Bernard G. Hoffman, deputy superintendent for the Neshaminy School District. It will serve as a classroom for students who have had trouble with alcohol or drug abuse and need to be taken out of the regular school environment temporarily to deal with their problems, Hoffman said.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
Vincent Phillips described the new alternative school program at Rancocas Valley Regional High School as a game of tug of war. "We might have to get dragged into the mud a bit, but eventually we'll get them over to the other side," said Phillips, an English and math teacher who will head this year's new program at the high school. Alternative schools are for students who disrupt regular classes. Typically, these students are frequently absent, cause discipline problems and have repeated several grades in school.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District has completed negotiations on a five-year deal with a private, for-profit company to run an alternative school for disruptive students in the city, beginning in the fall. The school, to be run by Community Education Partners Inc., which also operates schools in Texas, plans to start with 600 middle and high school students and grow to 1,500 by April, according to the contract signed by district and company officials. It likely will not be ready to open in September, but rather later in the fall, Board President Pedro Ramos said yesterday after a school board meeting.
NEWS
September 24, 1998 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After waiting six years and spending nearly $2 million, Middletown residents will finally get some use out of the 150-year-old Moon barn. Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday night to lease the township-owned barn, on Langhorne-Yardley Road, for 10 years to Youth Services of Bucks County, a private nonprofit organization that educates troubled youngsters. Youth Services will renovate the barn for use as an alternative school for about 40 students. Initially, 25 of them will come from the Neshaminy School District.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An alternative school in South Philadelphia was evacuated this morning after a staff member reported smelling acrid fumes. Some 25 students spilled from the Ombudsman South Accelerated School, on the 2700 block of S. Front Street, about 10:40 a.m. as officials called the fire department. One student was taken to Methodist Hospital for chest pains, and two other students were went home early after reporting they did not feel well, said district spokeswoman Deirdre Darragh. Darragh said an inspector traced the fumes to the school's air-conditioning system.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Miguelina Rodriguez walks into an alternative school program at an East Camden church for the start of the semester Thursday, she will pick up books and return home. No teachers will be there to help with a math equation, or classmates to study with. The Community Education Resource Network (CERN) has shut its in-house alternative program at Bethel United Methodist Church for lack of funding. It will support home schooling, but even that is on the verge of extinction. Townsend Press in Berlin has donated take-home material, but CERN founder Angel Cordero said the core of the program depends on students receiving face-to-face instruction.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | By Gail Gibson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Though Lansdale officials have come out against a plan to put an alternative school in an empty building on Main Street, the agency that proposed the school is moving ahead anyway. Ted Wachtel, executive director of Community Services Foundation Inc. (CSF), said he was waiting to find out whether his bid to purchase the former Feldi's Furniture store would be accepted. If it is, Wachtel will go to the borough's Zoning Hearing Board in an attempt to have the parking requirements for the building waived.
NEWS
June 22, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposed charter high school for drug- and alcohol-dependent teenagers, which only months ago seemed dead in the water, has been resuscitated by a plan to fold it into Gloucester County's alternative school. Earlier this year, the state Department of Education turned down an application by Mary Cormier of Marlton to open the Gloucester County Charter High School for students in the ninth through 12th grades who are recovering from bouts with substance abuse. State officials said they liked the idea, but wondered if it could best be incorporated into an existing alternative-school setting.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposal to establish a charter school in the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District apparently did not die with last summer's approval of the $25 million renovation project at Strath Haven High School. The Partnership for Alternatives in Education, a Swarthmore-based parents group that promoted a magnet or charter high school last year, said it was now focusing on the possibility of establishing a second middle school in the 3,400-student district. The partnership will sponsor a forum on charter schools at 7:30 p.m. next Monday in the library of Strath Haven Middle School, 200 S. Providence Rd. Lisa O'Brien of Swarthmore, a former school board member and spokeswoman for the group, said the forum would provide an update on what is happening with charter schools in Pennsylvania.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
DRUMMERS sounded out the beats of protest across the street from the Norman Blumberg public-housing projects yesterday. Colorful flags, including the red-green-and-black flag of the African Liberation movement, hung from the community-built "earthship" - a hut made of earth, old tires and other recycled materials. The hut sits at the edge of the newly fenced-off North Philly Peace Park. The earthship is a handmade "community center" serving as an alternative school for a neighborhood that has seen two nearby schools - Roberts Vaux High and Gen. John F. Reynolds Elementary - close recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
When Mandy Edwards tells people that she has a 17-year-old son and a 5-month-old daughter, they assume the second baby was an accident. But they have it all wrong. It was the first pregnancy, the one that happened when Mandy was just 19 - a college sophomore, part-time model, and aspiring music writer - that was unplanned. It took five drugstore test kits and an ultrasound to convince her that she was actually pregnant. "When I found out I was going to have this baby, that changed things," she says.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The attendance officer at Arise Academy Charter High School in West Oak Lane was concerned when a junior with spotless attendance missed school. Administrators made calls and found out that the agency that runs the group home where Affrika Clarke, 18, lived had abruptly moved her and her housemates in May to a motel in Fort Washington because of bedbugs. But the group home but would not transport her to school from the new location. So principal Taneisha Spall and another administrator picked up Clarke and drove her back and forth for a few days until she returned to her group home in Germantown.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
You'd be hard-pressed to find a college not offering online courses. Some are cheap alternatives to traditional schooling. Here are some things to consider about inexpensive distance learning. Coursera offers free online access to hundreds of college courses from Yale, Peking University, Penn State and 106 other institutions of higher learning. That's impressive, but can you get real credit for taking a course on Coursera? Yes, in a way. Within a few weeks of starting a course, you can decide to opt for Signature Tracking.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER A vacant 1930s-era school is about to gain new life as an upscale apartment building in the City of Chester, according to a Chester Upland School District official. The Wetherill School, a classic stone building on East 24th Street, recently was sold at auction for $200,000 to Best Homes Co. of Glenolden, which plans to undertake the conversion, Chester Upland Solicitor Leo A. Hackett said Thursday. Two other vacant school district structures also have been auctioned. "That building is a fortress," he said, adding that the project would be a massive undertaking.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A GROUP OF current and former students launched a campaign yesterday to identify peers they claim have been pushed out of Philadelphia public schools through closings or cutbacks to key programs. Youth United for Change said the closure of 24 schools last year, combined with cuts to the school district's Re-Engagement Center and slots in accelerated schools, has left students who drop out with few options. "Being pushed out is unfair," said YUC member Maury Elliott, a former Simon Gratz High student who briefly re-enrolled in an alternative school.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Natalie Hawtin arrived in Philadelphia from Michigan with her teaching degree in 2010, she dropped by a school in Center City and was captivated by the students and staff. Even after she landed another job in the School District, Hawtin would stroll past Greenfield Elementary School at Chestnut and 22d Streets, point to a third-story window, and say: "One day I'm going to teach there. " Hawtin's dream came true, and she began teaching second grade at Greenfield in September.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shayla Evermon-Muniz, a student at Nebinger School, was vocal in more ways than one at City Hall on Thursday morning. After singing Mariah Carey's "Hero" outside City Council chambers, Shayla, 10, talked about how education has accommodated her love for arts and music. If those programs were cut from the Philadelphia public schools, "I would never come back to school," she said. "Music is a big part of my life, and so is drawing. " Shayla and two other students joined civic activists to push for more funding for the Philadelphia School District.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Education is investigating a Bala Cynwyd company's alternative-education program in Bucks County after finding a series of problems in the company's program in Reading. Department spokesman Timothy Eller confirmed Tuesday that state authorities were gathering and examining information about Delaware Valley High School's operations in Warminster. The program serves students with academic and disciplinary problems from school districts in Bucks and Montgomery Counties.
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