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Altitude

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SPORTS
January 11, 1990 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the third time in the last four seasons, the championship of the American Football Conference and the Super Bowl berth that goes with it will be decided at Mile High Stadium when the Denver Broncos and Cleveland Browns do battle on Sunday. And if the history of this series weren't volatile enough, the pending playoff scrap has raised a new controversy to a Rocky Mountain high. The latest brouhaha reverberating between Denver (12-5) and Cleveland (10-6-1) has been generated by the mile-high elevation that prevails here, usually to the detriment of teams trying to knock off the Broncos.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
As if Peyton Manning wasn't enough of a challenge, the Eagles must also consider the high altitude when visiting the Denver Broncos on Sunday. Coach Chip Kelly has experience bringing his fast-paced offense to the Rocky Mountains. In a 2011 Oregon game against Colorado, Kelly's Ducks scored 45 points in three quarters even without their starting quarterback and running back. "I think what makes a difference when you play at altitude is who you play against," Kelly said. "We played against the University of Colorado a couple years ago, it wasn't a big deal.
SPORTS
May 22, 1992 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One could almost visualize Olympian John Stockton sitting alone at the Delta Center in a cramped room lit only by the flickering light of a film featuring the heroics of Portland's Terry Porter . . . and popping Rolaids. Dozens of them. Stockton, Utah's all-everything guard who, ironically, was named to the NBA's all-defensive team Wednesday, has that much reason to be concerned. The NBA's leader in steals this season has focused all of his bountiful defensive talents in this Western Conference finals on Porter, yet has done very little.
NEWS
May 6, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sukhamay Lahiri, 76, of Bala Cynwyd, physiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1969 to last year, died of prostate cancer Saturday at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse in Center City. As a researcher of high altitude conditions, Mr. Lahiri made seven research trips to camps on, but below the summit of, Mount Everest. On his 1960 climb, he accompanied Sir Edmund Hillary, who in 1953 was one of the men to first reach the top. In his trips to the Himalayas and to the Peruvian Andes, his work explored "how human beings react to less oxygen pressure," said his wife, Krishna.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
A congressional study of the nation's system for guiding aircraft says some air traffic controllers work without video screen information on altitude, speed and direction for up to 16 minutes. The study said the problem could worsen with a requirement, in effect since July 1, that all planes flying within 30 miles of large traffic control centers be equipped with transponders that transmit altitude information. The requirement, which affects 44,000 additional aircraft, was designed to reduce near collisions.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
HEALTHY LAUGHTER Maybe we can laugh our troubles away. Swedish researchers gave six women, who were suffering from painful muscular problems linked to minor depression, comedy books, records, and videos and encouragement to find humor in everyday life. The women often laughed enough to stop hurting, researchers report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Most had quick symptom relief at the sessions and improved their "quality of life" the rest of the time. SHOT-UP EARS Hunters, as you prepare your equipment for the fall shooting, pack some earplugs.
SPORTS
June 25, 1987 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been nearly 20 years since Lee Evans set the world record for the 400 meters - 43.86 seconds - the time he recorded in 1968 on his way to an Olympic gold medal in the 7,500-foot altitude of Mexico City. Up until the last two years, Evans' record seemed all too safe, its altitude-enhanced excellence protected by a succession of low-altitude challenges and a decade of none-too-powerful challengers. But the quality of U.S. quarter-milers this season has recaptured the world-class luster of Evans' era. The USA/Mobil Outdoor Track and Field Championships here this week should produce the most formidable threat to Evans' record yet. Indeed, should the mark fall in San Jose, where Evans spent most of his celebrated career, the result would be more ironic than surprising.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The system that guides modern aircraft through increasingly crowded skies relies on old equipment and, pilots grumble, procedures set up before radar came into widespread use. The aging equipment often breaks down, as has happened four times in less than a year at Philadelphia International Airport - most recently Friday night. And, pilots say, the outmoded procedures create chaotic situations in areas such as Philadelphia, which is sandwiched between New York and Washington, each with three busy airports.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
THE LAST TIME the Eagles went to Denver was the final game of Terrell Owens' Eagles career, though nobody knew it that day. The Birds lost, 49-21, on Oct. 30, 2005, though Owens took a Donovan McNabb pass 91 yards for a touchdown. Later that week, Owens would give an ESPN interview that would reopen his rift with McNabb, and stuff just seemed to snowball from there. But that was probably the game that showed us the defending NFC champions, though they came home 4-3, weren't going back to the Super Bowl.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling American military pilots "Rambos," some members of Italy's media and government yesterday demanded criminal prosecution of a Marine whose surveillance jet sliced a cable car wire Tuesday, sending 20 people plunging to their deaths at a ski resort. Outrage over the accident erupted throughout the Italian government, especially from the Refounded Communist Party, which has been seeking to close American military bases in Italy since the 1950s. Italian politicians yesterday visited the Alpe Cermis ski resort, where the snow was still streaked with the blood of skiers and a cable operator who fell nearly 300 feet.
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SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
THE LAST TIME the Eagles went to Denver was the final game of Terrell Owens' Eagles career, though nobody knew it that day. The Birds lost, 49-21, on Oct. 30, 2005, though Owens took a Donovan McNabb pass 91 yards for a touchdown. Later that week, Owens would give an ESPN interview that would reopen his rift with McNabb, and stuff just seemed to snowball from there. But that was probably the game that showed us the defending NFC champions, though they came home 4-3, weren't going back to the Super Bowl.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
As if Peyton Manning wasn't enough of a challenge, the Eagles must also consider the high altitude when visiting the Denver Broncos on Sunday. Coach Chip Kelly has experience bringing his fast-paced offense to the Rocky Mountains. In a 2011 Oregon game against Colorado, Kelly's Ducks scored 45 points in three quarters even without their starting quarterback and running back. "I think what makes a difference when you play at altitude is who you play against," Kelly said. "We played against the University of Colorado a couple years ago, it wasn't a big deal.
SPORTS
May 21, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
EVERYBODY loves an underdog, and every year there is a rookie of humble pedigree who catches the imagination of Eagles fans. Sometimes he's a seventh-round draft choice (Nate Ilaoa, a stubby fullback from Hawaii in 2007), sometimes he's an undrafted free agent (Chad Hall, a height-challenged ex-Air Force officer in 2010, or Damaris Johnson, the wideout/returner who supplanted Hall last year). Quite often, this object of fan affection doesn't even make the team. When he does make it, his impact tends to lag way behind the amount of attention he gets on message boards.
SPORTS
March 22, 2013 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Gonzaga certainly won't catch anyone by surprise this year. Long ago considered the plucky underdog, the Bulldogs go into this year's NCAA tournament as the top seed in the West and with the No. 1 ranking in the Associated Press poll. Led by 7-foot center Kelly Olynyk, Gonzaga (31-2) opens the tournament Thursday in Salt Lake City against Southern University (23-9), the champions of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. Gonzaga is making its 15th straight appearance in March Madness, a streak surpassed only by Kansas, Michigan State, and Duke.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2012
It was to be a trip of a lifetime. And I thought I was ready to happily wander the halls and walls and steps of Machu Picchu, the Inca city built about 600 or more years ago 8,000 feet up in the Peruvian Andes, and to marvel at this place mysteriously abandoned in the 1500s and "discovered" by an American archaeologist in 1911. Since then, its overgrowth has been cut back, gradually revealing a majestic high-mountain ruin that today draws tens of thousands of tourists like me, hikers, and just gawkers who wonder how it was all done.
NEWS
August 20, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Edwin Wood III, 85, chairman of the department of medicine at Pennsylvania Hospital from 1969 to 1990, died of cancer Sunday, Aug. 15, at Beaumont, a retirement community in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Wood also served on the medical faculties at Boston University, the Medical College of Georgia, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Virginia. And Dr. Wood had an adventurous streak. Not only did he run five marathons, said his wife, Ann, but he ran the last when he was 63. He also once lived at an outpost of the Indian army in the Himalayan state of Jammu and Kashmir for a month in 1967.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
This year's biggest prom trend isn't the dress. It's the tress. Literally. Local hairstylists are predicting big hair - ? la the boobalicious and bodacious raven-haired "Snooki" from MTV's Jersey Shore - will be the hottest trend on teens on prom night. "Our prom girls are coming in and they want messy buns and tousled hair with bumps," said Tiffany Nurick, a stylist at Heaven and Earth in Lafayette Hill. "It's all about big, loose and not overly styled hair. And you aren't just seeing it in women, you are seeing it in men as well.
NEWS
May 6, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sukhamay Lahiri, 76, of Bala Cynwyd, physiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1969 to last year, died of prostate cancer Saturday at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse in Center City. As a researcher of high altitude conditions, Mr. Lahiri made seven research trips to camps on, but below the summit of, Mount Everest. On his 1960 climb, he accompanied Sir Edmund Hillary, who in 1953 was one of the men to first reach the top. In his trips to the Himalayas and to the Peruvian Andes, his work explored "how human beings react to less oxygen pressure," said his wife, Krishna.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
US Airways said yesterday that it would report a loss for 2008 and cut more capacity - flights and seats - this year to deal with weaker travel demand in a depressed economy. Philadelphia's largest airline, which shuttles two-thirds of passengers at Philadelphia International Airport, did not say how big the loss would be. The carrier, based in Tempe, Ariz., is expected to report full-year and fourth-quarter earnings results Jan. 29. Wall Street analysts expect a loss of $1.77 billion, according to Thomson Reuters, due largely to fuel-related losses last year in the second and third quarters.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2008 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Airline analysts looking out for investors may have been the only people yesterday celebrating a raft of bad news about the industry. Skybus Airlines Inc., a year-old carrier that started flying less than a month ago from Wilmington's New Castle Airport, abruptly went out of business Friday, joining two other airlines that filed for bankruptcy protection last week. It was the first time in memory that three airlines quit flying in such a short span. Yesterday, the annual Airline Quality Survey found that flight delays, lost bags and customer complaints all were up in 2007 over the year before.
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