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Aluminum Siding

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Our house was fitted with white aluminum siding by the prior owners decades ago. We've been in it about 16 years now. The siding has held up OK except in the front above the porch, which gets the morning sun. It is losing its paint. Is there a preferred method of dealing with this? Answer: Yes there is. And for advice about anything paint, I turn to the experts at the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. First, how should you prepare old aluminum siding before painting?
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A meteorologist confirmed yesterday that a tornado touched down Thursday night in Bordentown Township, tearing off the side of one home and leaving a trail of broken tree limbs, smashed windows and dangling aluminum siding along its mile-long route. Art Kraus, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Philadelphia, inspected the damage yesterday and determined that a tornado had passed through the Burlington County township. "With wind damage, everything is just blown down," Kraus said.
NEWS
July 19, 1993 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 600 block of Durfor Street, where the smell of simmering garlic hung in the air, women in housecoats and slippers were sitting on their front stoops, talking about Al Pacino, the movie business, and rumors of "fat checks" flying around the neighborhood. For about a month now, advance crews for Two Bits, a movie set in the Depression, have been working in South Philadelphia, converting about 200 rowhouses and 50 storefronts around Seventh and Wolf Streets into a 1930s movie set. In preparation for filming, which will begin next Monday, workers have been going door to door in the neighborhood, removing aluminum siding, air conditioners, TV antennas, and all other signs of modern times.
REAL_ESTATE
January 10, 1986 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Ramsgate Cherry Hill 609-424-3319 Single-family houses are under construction at Ramsgate in Cherry Hill by the father-daughter building team of Charles A. Gemberling and Cheryl Gemberling Kozloff. This is the first project the two have worked on together, although Gemberling has been building in Burlington and Camden Counties for more than 30 years and Kozloff for more than 12 years, according to sales representative Joseph H. Sypherd. Plans call for 85 two-story, four-bedroom houses at Ramsgate, each with 2,400 to 3,000 square feet of living space, and costing between $130,900 and $156,900.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
When it comes to trees, don't try to rustle with the Tredyffrin Township Planning Commission. For nearly two years, C & R Associates of Wayne has been trying to gain approval to build 18 townhouses on Berwyn-Baptist Road in Devon. After the regular Planning Commission meeting Thursday night, William Marchini, owner of the firm, said he and others working on the plan had become "disgusted" with the progress of approval. The plan, which proposes building the townhouses on 4.9 acres, has gone to the Zoning Hearing Board,but it still has not been approved by the Planning Commission in preliminary form and must go before the township's Board of Supervisors for final approval before building could commence.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
An 18-year-old man charged with ethnic intimidation, assault and other crimes in connection with the alleged harassment of a black couple in a white neighborhood was released on his own recognizance today following an arraignment before a Municipal Court judge. Later, the black couple, Bill and Maryellen Snow, who were supported by a busload of friends and neighbors, both black and white, expressed disappointment at the release of the defendant, Ronald Rink. "I think they should have arrested him right then and there (at the time of the Nov. 6 incident)
REAL_ESTATE
April 28, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce and Sylvia Wilson restored their 1891 home in Merchantville, the neighborhood's "great white elephant," and transformed it into one worthy of the local historical architecture tour. And they did it all with a bit of financial creativity. Over 34 years, they completed exterior and interior renovations on a budget, ripping off siding, repainting, wallpapering, designing and even carving architectural elements themselves for the house, purchased for $52,500 in 1980. Outside contractors were hired only for a full kitchen demolition, a third-floor bathroom conversion, and heating/air conditioning work.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If this were Evesham or Voorhees, where residential developments sometimes seem to just sprout from the ground, the problems of a townhouse complex's developer, its residents and officials might have been resolved long ago. But this is Lawnside, a borough of 3,000 people and one-story single-family homes, where the last such development dates to 1975. So says Narberth Development Corp., the company behind King's Court, a 2- year-old, 20-unit complex off Gloucester Avenue. "That's not the point," says Lawnside Councilman Leon Williams, who - along with other officials and townhouse residents - has accused Narberth of dragging its feet on repairing houses and streets and answering complaints.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Shirley Salemy Meyer, Associated Press
Researching the history of a house or a neighborhood is painstaking work. Some delve into the past for practical reasons. Perhaps they want to change the exterior of an old house and need to document how it once looked. Or maybe they want to create — or protest — a historic designation. Others are simply fascinated by the testament of time. "A house is like an artifact," said Kingston Heath, professor and director of the graduate Historic Preservation Program at the University of Oregon.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are hints that a long, acrimonious fight over a vacant rowhouse on Cheltenham Avenue may be resolved soon, paving the way for the sale of the deteriorating building. The house at 1253 E. Cheltenham Ave., empty for more than three years, has been tangled in a struggle pitting advocates for the homeless against neighborhood residents and their representatives on City Council. The latest knot in efforts to put the house on the market came in March. The Committee for Dignity and Fairness for the Homeless Housing Development Inc., a government-funded program commonly known as Dignity Housing, filed a lawsuit in federal court against three City Council members.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
April 28, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce and Sylvia Wilson restored their 1891 home in Merchantville, the neighborhood's "great white elephant," and transformed it into one worthy of the local historical architecture tour. And they did it all with a bit of financial creativity. Over 34 years, they completed exterior and interior renovations on a budget, ripping off siding, repainting, wallpapering, designing and even carving architectural elements themselves for the house, purchased for $52,500 in 1980. Outside contractors were hired only for a full kitchen demolition, a third-floor bathroom conversion, and heating/air conditioning work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Our house was fitted with white aluminum siding by the prior owners decades ago. We've been in it about 16 years now. The siding has held up OK except in the front above the porch, which gets the morning sun. It is losing its paint. Is there a preferred method of dealing with this? Answer: Yes there is. And for advice about anything paint, I turn to the experts at the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. First, how should you prepare old aluminum siding before painting?
BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Shirley Salemy Meyer, Associated Press
Researching the history of a house or a neighborhood is painstaking work. Some delve into the past for practical reasons. Perhaps they want to change the exterior of an old house and need to document how it once looked. Or maybe they want to create — or protest — a historic designation. Others are simply fascinated by the testament of time. "A house is like an artifact," said Kingston Heath, professor and director of the graduate Historic Preservation Program at the University of Oregon.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | Al Heavens
Question: I have a home, built about 1950, that has tin siding. Can or should this siding be repainted (and how?), or is it best to remove it and install new siding, such as vinyl? Answer: I've seen a lot of evidence that tin siding can be repainted, although I haven't found much information on how to do it. I had tin gutters — actually terne, a zinc/tin alloy — on my turn-of-the-20th-century former house. The experts recommended Tin-O-Lin, which I bought at a Philadelphia roofing supplier, a slow-drying linseed oil-based primer and finish coat recommended for spot priming exposed and rusted areas.
LIVING
January 15, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: The 40-year-old white aluminum siding on my house is starting to peel off, showing gray underneath. Is there a special paint that can be applied to cover it? Answer: I went to my best source of painting information, the Web site of the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House, Montgomery County, and found, as usual, all the information you need. So, reader Marie Downey and others, here's a link so you can consume the institute's information at your leisure, or when the weather warms enough for exterior painting: http://go.
LIVING
June 5, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: My daughter moved into a house that has aluminum siding. The siding is in good condition, but it is ugly - it's white and chalky-looking and faded, if white can look faded. A handyman/painter has told her it could be painted. My son says it can be painted, but would not be a very successful project - after a short period of time the paint would flake and the siding would look worse than it does now. He says power washing is not the way to go, either. Can this siding be painted and, if so, what is the proper way to ensure a good job?
REAL_ESTATE
April 21, 2002 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
In the beginning - well, after the big move out of caves - most people lived in huts with thatched roofs and stone or mud walls. The rich lived in castles, which definitely had stone walls. As humans made progress, they used a variety of siding materials - stone, brick, stucco, and lots of wood. But within the last 50 years, wood siding has become increasingly more expensive, adding considerably to the cost of new housing. The supply of lumber, especially cedar, has contracted for a variety of reasons, mostly environmental, which has boosted the price.
REAL_ESTATE
March 29, 1998 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barry and Margaret Parsons pull out all the stops in trying to sell the family home on Granite Street in Frankford. Candles are lighted. Rooms are sparkling clean. Toys are in the toy box and fresh apple pies baking in the oven when prospective buyers come. The Parsonses' daughters - Krystle, Megan and Rebecca - have the routine down to a science. A prospective buyer comes in the front door, the girls and the dog go out the back for a walk. But it's been almost five months since the pretty little rowhouse with three bedrooms, pale-pink walls, and solid-oak kitchen cabinets went on the market.
NEWS
July 19, 1993 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 600 block of Durfor Street, where the smell of simmering garlic hung in the air, women in housecoats and slippers were sitting on their front stoops, talking about Al Pacino, the movie business, and rumors of "fat checks" flying around the neighborhood. For about a month now, advance crews for Two Bits, a movie set in the Depression, have been working in South Philadelphia, converting about 200 rowhouses and 50 storefronts around Seventh and Wolf Streets into a 1930s movie set. In preparation for filming, which will begin next Monday, workers have been going door to door in the neighborhood, removing aluminum siding, air conditioners, TV antennas, and all other signs of modern times.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If this were Evesham or Voorhees, where residential developments sometimes seem to just sprout from the ground, the problems of a townhouse complex's developer, its residents and officials might have been resolved long ago. But this is Lawnside, a borough of 3,000 people and one-story single-family homes, where the last such development dates to 1975. So says Narberth Development Corp., the company behind King's Court, a 2- year-old, 20-unit complex off Gloucester Avenue. "That's not the point," says Lawnside Councilman Leon Williams, who - along with other officials and townhouse residents - has accused Narberth of dragging its feet on repairing houses and streets and answering complaints.
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