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NEWS
November 3, 1988 | By Karen Akerlof, Special to The Inquirer
Six Rosemont College alumnae, speaking at a panel discussion on "Women in Politics," told an audience at the college Saturday that despite continuing sexism, politics is gradually opening up to women. "We have gotten over the hump of women's liberation. We can't say that (sexism) isn't there, but we can deal with it," said Tracey Massey, Tredyffrin Township supervisor. "I think that we sometimes have trouble being taken seriously," said Patricia Dohrenwend, town clerk in Eastchester, N.Y., arguing that woman face fewer problems with sexism as candidates than they do as office-holders.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
On Sunday, Immaculata College in Malvern inaugurated Sister Marie Roseanne Bonfini as its eighth president. Sister Marie Roseanne, a French professor, has held several administrative posts at the college.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Carol Spodobalski was a "day hop. " That's what they called the young ladies who commuted to "Eden," once one of the ritziest Catholic girls' schools in creation. It closed 20 years ago. Officially known as the Convent of the Sacred Heart Eden Hall, it was located on more than 70 acres of meadows, cornfields, orchards, and plush greenery at Torresdale and Grant avenues in Northeast Philadelphia. Eden was truly one of early Philadelphia's garden spots. For decades, girls from all over the world enrolled at the $1,000-a-year, private institution to receive the excellent education and spiritual values the Sacred Heart nuns imparted to the students.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2003 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's just an itty-bitty space, but it's a real big deal for Moore College of Art and Design. The Art Shop at Moore College opened a small outpost Friday at its Parkway neighbor's, the Franklin Institute Science Museum, where artwork by seven alumnae is on sale alongside the institute's more scientific offerings. One of the Moore artists is Heather Bryson, who makes jewelry from fossilized palmwood, dinosaur bone and antique ostrich-egg shells, among other things. Work by Sandra Webberking includes sculptures of insects such as grasshoppers, fireflies, dragonflies and butterflies made out of steel rods, bolts and marbles.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The horrible news came down when Laurie Nowlan was in eighth grade: Her school was closing. "It was right before Christmas when we heard," Nowlan said. "The nuns wanted to close the school. We even went to Holy Child to take the entrance exams. " But Nowlan and her classmates at the Country Day School of the Sacred Heart, then in Lower Merion, were lucky - at least temporarily. Parents formed a committee to run the school and were able to keep it going for two more years, until 1971.
NEWS
July 16, 2005 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And then there was one. That is what top officials at Rutgers University hope to achieve through a plan to consolidate Livingston, Douglass and Rutgers into one - the Rutgers College of Arts and Science. But Douglass College alumnae fear losing their individuality and contend the merger would effectively eliminate the nation's largest public women's college. On Thursday, the Associated Alumnae of Douglass College launched a campaign opposing the consolidation plan. The group has posted an online petition that, as of Thursday, had 600 signers.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the finishing touches were put on the art exhibit in Rosemont College's Lawrence Gallery, visitors yesterday wandered about, reviewing the work and weighing whether it was worth the school president's job. "I don't think anyone is offended," said senior Cristina Madura. "People walk through and say: 'Is this it'?" Funded by a $4,000 grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the exhibit focuses on gender politics, using women's underwear as a medium. It includes undergarments crafted from papier mache, beer cans, metal and other media, some of them espousing political messages.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Immaculata College has reached its capital fund-raising goal of $3 million in three years. The college announced Tuesday that the campaign reached its goal before the June 30 deadline and with pledges still trickling in. More than 400 volunteers - alumnae, parents, trustees, friends and area business people - participated in the campaign, which officially began July 1, 1984, and was promoted by former Eagles' coach Dick Vermeil. Vermeil, known for his emotional and inspirational pep talks, was a featured speaker at a kickoff dinner for the volunteers.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing 1,000 strong on Torresdale Avenue, the students, alumnae and supporters of St. Hubert Catholic High School for Girls said Friday that they would raise hundreds of thousands of dollars in two weeks for a chance to save their school. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced last week that it would close St. Hubert and three other high schools because of declining enrollment. It also plans to close 45 elementary schools. Kathryn Ott Lovell, a member of the alumnae association advisory board, said the association had been under the impression it had to hand over a cash deposit of $1.2 million before the archdiocese would hear an appeal of its decision to close the 70-year-old institution, which the archdiocese later denied.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | By Mark E. Neumann, Special to The Inquirer
There was no doubting Ester Weston King knew her way around the tree-lined school grounds quite well, despite the considerable changes. Dirt roads had been paved. New buildings had been erected where horses had wandered. But the Roxborough resident and member of the class of 1918 at The Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr said the school had not lost the qualities that have inspired memories for graduates over the 100 years since its founding. "We used to keep the horses in there," she said, pointing a steady finger to what is now the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop, where the school's theater performances are held.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
Gratz College recently received an endowment gift of $1 million, the largest such gift in the Montgomery County institution's 120-year history, officials said Tuesday. The gift was bequeathed by Berenice Abrams, an alumna from the class of 1936, in memory of her parents, said Joy Goldstein, the college's president. The gift is restricted for the use of the Benjamin and Dorothy Abrams Scholarship Fund, which will aid teachers working in the field of Jewish education. Abrams, 96, died in 2014.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tweets threatening violence against black people at Kean University, roiling the school and sparking criticism of campus leadership, were sent by a black alumna who is an activist, authorities said. The Union County Prosecutor's Office announced Tuesday that it had charged Kayla-Simone McKelvey, 24, of Union Township, with creating a false public alarm. McKelvey made the anonymous Twitter account, @keanuagainstblk, during a student rally Nov. 17, the Prosecutor's Office said. McKelvey left the demonstration, walked to a computer station in a Kean library, and began posting threats of violence.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Katherine Y.M. Gordon-Clark, 80, of Swarthmore, a specialist in learning disabilities, died Sunday, Oct. 25, from complications of multiple myeloma at the Quadrangle in Haverford Township. For 35 years, Dr. Gordon-Clark worked for the Child Study Institute, a clinic run by Bryn Mawr College, where she rose from intern to assistant director. For years, she co-taught a graduate-level course at the college on psychological assessment, and mentored the students in her classes. Dr. Gordon-Clark became interested in identifying learning disabilities, including dyslexia, from time spent as an English teacher in her 20s. She received a bachelor's degree in English, and master's and doctoral degrees in psychology, all from Bryn Mawr College.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY ABBY CRUZ, Daily News Staff Writer cruza@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
SIMONE WAHEED, a fourth-grader at Universal Institute Charter School in South Philly, has never missed an "I Am B.U.M.I. " lesson. "I come to every single class. It teaches me how to make friends and how to be a woman - well, a young lady," she said. Simone, 9, was one of 20 girls at her school attending the I Am B.U.M.I. - for Beautiful, Unique, Magnificent Individual - mentoring program, which teaches girls, ages 5 to 18, to achieve regardless of where they live or their circumstances.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a closeted Temple University student in 1950, Edith Windsor could not have imagined the reception she would receive at her alma mater in 2014: an award for her activism; a standing ovation from a large, adoring crowd; a presentation from the mayor. Windsor, now 84, won the lawsuit that toppled the federal Defense of Marriage Act in 2013 and has been called the matriarch of the gay-rights movement. Sharp, stylish, trim, and funny, Windsor enjoyed every moment of her tribute at the university, including Mayor Nutter handing her a miniature, working Liberty Bell and proclaiming Saturday "Edie Windsor Day" in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
October 18, 2012 | By Mel Greenberg, For The Inquirer
Debbie Black, the former St. Joseph's playmaker and WNBA all-star who is currently an assistant to Jim Foster, her former Hawks coach, at Ohio State, will be among the inductees Nov. 8 into the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame at a ceremony at the Sheraton Society Hill. The former Archbishop Wood High School star was named early last summer just days after it was announced that Foster will be part of the next Women's Basketball Hall of Fame class in Knoxville, Tenn., next June. Incidentally, Ohio State will play Muffet McGraw's Notre Dame squad on the deck of an aircraft carrier Nov. 9 in Charleston, S.C., to launch the season as part of a men's-women's doubleheader.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing 1,000 strong on Torresdale Avenue, the students, alumnae and supporters of St. Hubert Catholic High School for Girls said Friday that they would raise hundreds of thousands of dollars in two weeks for a chance to save their school. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced two weeks ago that it would close St. Hubert and three other high schools because of declining enrollment. It also plans to close 45 elementary schools. Kathryn Ott Lovell, a member of the alumnae association advisory board, said the association had been under the impression it had to hand over a cash deposit of $1.2 million before the archdiocese would hear an appeal of its decision to close the 70-year-old institution, which the archdiocese later denied.
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | BY JOSH CORNFIELD, cornfij@phillynews.com215-854-2893
The day began at St. Hubert's High School on Monday with hundreds of teens lining the steps of the all-girls school at Cottman and Torresdale avenues, rallying in hopes that their school could be saved. It ended with hundreds of alumnae - the girls' moms, big sisters, grandmoms (and even some dads) - coming together to start planning how to save it. Hundreds of Hubert's girls - present and past - crowded into the school auditorium Monday night to vent and to strategize, three days after the Archdiocese announced that the school is one of four high schools in the region it plans to close in June.
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