CollectionsAlzheimer
IN THE NEWS

Alzheimer

NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
If a simple blood test could predict whether you would develop Alzheimer's disease within three years, would you take it? That hypothetical question got a bit closer to reality with a study published Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine. A team of researchers reported that they had developed just such a test, and that it was 90 percent accurate in determining the neurological fate of 30 men and women ages 70 and up, based on the level of fatty molecules in their blood. The authors, led by a Georgetown University physician scientist, acknowledged that their patient sample was small and said the results need to be reproduced by other labs to make sure they are as promising as they seem.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I'm writing in response to "Friend in Arizona. " She wrote that after her friend "Blanche" was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, Blanche asked not to be "paraded around for others to gawk at" after she reached a certain point. You advised that continuing to take her friend to church every Sunday was going against her wishes. I disagree. I'm an LPN and specialize in Alzheimer's. I have been doing this for more than 25 years. One thing we strive for is a sense of normalcy.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After 14 years of Alzheimer's, Martha Fletcher doesn't really know her husband anymore. But Don Fletcher still knows his wife. And his new book, Martha and I , gives readers a deep sense of the beloved spouse, mother of six, and accomplished musician with whom he has shared a life for 71 years. "I want them to see Martha as she was: totally warm, very extroverted, and self-giving," says Fletcher, 94, a mostly retired Presbyterian minister. Still lovely at 91, his wife has lost the use of language and spends much of her day asleep or in a wheelchair in their cozy home at Lion's Gate in Voorhees.
SPORTS
October 4, 1989 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
When he entered Swarthmore College in 1986, Bill Martin did not plan to become a psychology major, let alone get heavily involved with laboratory experiments that might eventually aid in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Martin started out majoring in political science, with an eye toward law school. And he very well might have followed that course if he had been able to sign up for a particular class during his freshman year. "By the time I went to register, it was closed out," said Martin, a senior running back in football and the team's leading rusher this season.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc., a local biotech start-up rooted in a doctoral student's desire to find an early diagnosis for Alzheimer's disease, is being purchased by Eli Lilly & Co. for an initial $300 million. The deal calls for investors to receive an additional $500 million if certain commercial and regulatory milestones are reached, including Food and Drug Administration approval for Avid's groundbreaking diagnostic chemical, florbetapir F 18. Florbetapir is a radioactive compound that binds with amyloid plaque, which is present in the brains of all Alzheimer's patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2011 | By Chris Talbott, Associated Press
BILOXI, Miss. - Glen Campbell is having a great time. Make no mistake, it is tragic that Alzheimer's disease is slowly stripping away the memories and abilities that define one of music's greats. But day to day, surrounded by family and friends, encouraged to play his guitar and sing and golf and joke, Campbell, 75, is often smiling. "I'm really not worried about anything," he said. "You know those people who say, 'Oh, geez, I wonder what's going to happen tomorrow?' Tomorrow's cool.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Carol Burg loves them all, but all of them would gladly go back to the lives they had before meeting her. Before Alzheimer's. "They're my angels," she says, voice pure Brooklyn, enthusiasm equally audible. "I love, love, love them. " Burg, 47, is assistant activities director in the Wellspring Memory Care building at Juniper Village, an assisted-living complex in Williamstown. The Voorhees resident has worked for three years at Wellspring, home to 36 people between the ages of 59 and 99. All have been diagnosed with end-stage dementia and are at risk of "elopement," a genteel euphemism for running away.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court yesterday ruled that a district court judge might have erred in granting a new trial to Fair Acres nursing home in a case involving an Upper Darby woman with Alzheimer's disease. The ruling could turn out to be a victory for elderly Alzheimer's patients like Margaret Wagner, a 65-year-old woman refused admission to Delaware County's Fair Acres facility because the nursing home said she had behavioral problems the home could not accommodate. Wagner's husband sued Fair Acres nursing home in 1993, alleging that the home's refusal to admit his wife of 46 years constituted discrimination by a publicly funded county facility.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1950s and 1960s, Jack Rensel was a player on the Philadelphia scene: a key figure in the efforts to keep the baseball Athletics in Philadelphia, co-creator of a theme song for the Philadelphia Phillies, a high-profile advertising executive. He was a vibrant and bustling man. Newspapers of the time frequently alluded to his "hustle. " Then the newspaper articles about Rensel stopped. He dropped out of sight. It turned out he was a victim of Alzheimer's disease. Far from the glare of publicity, Rensel slowly dwindled, his mind and body going until he died in 1987.
NEWS
December 24, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The inability to identify the smell of lemons, lilacs and eight other common scents predicts who is most likely to get Alzheimer's disease, according to new research. People who failed to recognize these scents were at higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease than those with more discriminating noses, the study found. Researchers measured how well people with mild cognitive impairment - memory problems that often precede Alzheimer's - could smell. Those who misidentified more than two of the 10 scents were nearly five times more likely to progress to Alzheimer's than those who did better, said Richard Doty, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Smell and Taste Center.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|