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NEWS
June 16, 2013 | DAN GERINGER
HIS FATHER stood 6-4, weighed 250 and was respected throughout his West Philadelphia neighborhood as a strong man, so Raymond Holman Jr. was startled when his dad phoned to say that a female stranger had come into his home and robbed him. "My father's friends called him 'Big Ray' and his friends were big guys," Holman said. "Everybody in the neighborhood knew daddy. I mean everybody. So it was really a shock that someone would have the nerve to come into daddy's house like that and steal from him. " But that shock back in 1997 was mild compared to what would follow.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Dementia can ruin a social life. Friends don't know how to act around someone whose brain is failing, and people with dementia often withdraw as social situations get more confusing. As a result, people with Alzheimer's or another memory-robbing dementia - and their caregivers - can become isolated. Knowing that, Genevieve Ilg, a social-work graduate student who is interning at the Penn Memory Center, was intrigued when she read about "memory cafés," a European innovation that is slowly taking hold in the United States.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Alzheimer's disease expert at Drexel University is testing an unusual approach to the disease: giving the brain what may be a more efficient source of energy. In people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, the brain loses its ability to properly metabolize glucose early in the course of disease, said Carol Lippa. This is critical because the brain needs a lot of fuel. "The brain uses, like, 30 percent of your oxygen," she said. "Your brain is really active metabolically, so it needs a really good supply of energy.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first clue that something was wrong with his grandmother came when Bill Mikus walked with her to a restaurant in Reading that she often visited. "You want your regular?" the waitress asked. It turned out the regular was just coffee. "She doesn't come here to eat?" Mikus asked the waitress, flabbergasted. He took some time off work to investigate. His grandmother, who had helped raise him after his mother died, was then in her mid-80s and lived alone. Her refrigerator was nearly empty.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What causes Alzheimer's disease? Since it does sometimes run in families, do you think it might be contagious? Answer: There doesn't appear to be one specific cause for Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. It occurs due to a complex mix of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors. Two factors are well known: advancing age and family history. If you are lucky enough to make it to 85 years of age, there's a 50-50 chance of getting Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: Are there any tests out there for Alzheimer's disease? Answer: As of now, the only definitive test for Alzheimer's disease is the analysis of brain tissue after death. That's why folks with a presumptive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease are described as having "senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type. " However, there may soon be a new blood test that can accurately diagnose Alzheimer's and differentiate it from other forms of dementia. Researchers at Canada's McGill University have found there is a dramatic difference between the production of the hormone DHEA in folks with Alzheimer's disease versus those without dementia or even other forms of dementia.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The patient turned 40 over the summer and was already having symptoms that made her neurologist wonder whether she had Alzheimer's disease, the deadly, mind-killing dementia that usually attacks far older people. She and her husband went to the Adler Institute for Advanced Imaging in Jenkintown on a recent morning after 70 tests over the last year failed to explain her worsening symptoms. She was going to try yet another: a newly approved test developed by a Philadelphia biotech firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014
A NEW STUDY has delivered compelling evidence that diet, exercise and other prescription-free interventions are the best way to ward off Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is perhaps the most dreadful of modern diseases: It steals your mind, your personality and your very soul. And once you have it, there is no turning back. On a personal note, I have seen firsthand the slow, devastating effects of this awful disease on a loved one, as well as the family members. So, my ears really perked up when I heard about the groundbreaking study that was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, the search for a treatment that will save our oldest generation from the scourge of Alzheimer's disease has been a long, frustrating slog. Paul Aisen, an Alzheimer's expert from the University of California, San Diego, explained why. For decades, researchers were dealing with a deadly disease that had no apparent symptoms for the first 15 years or so. When the symptoms started, they were not specific to Alzheimer's. By the time they got bad, the brain was already severely damaged.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
There are some promising drugs in the Alzheimer's pipeline, but a panel of experts asked to predict the potential financial impact of new treatments was not optimistic that a cure is imminent. Roy Beveridge, an oncologist who is chief medical officer for the insurer Humana, told a group of actuaries this week in Philadelphia that he expected to see cancer cures before drug developers figure out how to stop dementia. "We're not spending preparatory time around that," he said when asked how an Alzheimer's cure would affect the company.
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