CollectionsAlzheimer
IN THE NEWS

Alzheimer

NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day is coming when doctors will be able to diagnose and treat Alzheimer's disease before people have symptoms, and Ronald Petersen is among the doctors laying the groundwork for that future. Petersen is director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, which is using detailed tests to monitor cognitive changes in older adults from Olmsted County, Minn., as they age. He discussed the early results of the study recently at a talk sponsored by several programs at the University of Pennsylvania, including the Penn Memory Center.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
21 Alzheimer's staffers charged COMMERCE, Ga. - More than 20 employees of an assisted-living center for people with Alzheimer's disease face dozens of criminal charges after state investigators raided the center Tuesday and uncovered allegations that employees had mistreated patients, authorities said. The charges stem from a three-month probe of Alzheimer's Care of Commerce, 65 miles northeast of Atlanta, state officials said. Charges filed against the 21 involve accusations of abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2013
Daniel M. Skovronsky, M.D., Ph.D . Age: 39. Title: President, CEO, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc. Number of Employees: About 100. Tenure: Founded the molecular imaging agent company in December 2004. Financials: In 2010, Eli Lilly & Co. bought Avid for up to $800 million if benchmarks were met. Diagnosing Alzheimer's: More than 100 years ago, Dr. Alois Alzheimer [the discoverer of Alzheimer's disease] had a patient with dementia. After she died, he looked at her brain under the microscope and discovered it was full of these things called amyloid plaques.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Patterson was a man of firsts. He founded the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary school genetics clinic, the first of its kind in the country. He was the first to identify certain heart diseases in dogs that correlated to those in humans. And he contracted what is believed to be the first reported case of chimp-to-human-transmitted hepatitis A. Dr. Patterson, 82, a longtime Philadelphia resident, died Saturday, June 8, at Northwest Hospital and Medical Center in Seattle after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Judith Wilson Moreno, 79, a former health-care executive, died of Alzheimer's disease Saturday, June 15, at CareOne Harmony Village at Moorestown, an assisted-living community for the memory-impaired, where she had lived since 2010. Born in Philadelphia, she was a 1951 graduate of Frankford High School, attended Marymount College in Tarrytown, N.Y., graduated in 1954 from the Chestnut Hill Hospital School of Nursing, and later earned a master's degree in nursing at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | DAN GERINGER
HIS FATHER stood 6-4, weighed 250 and was respected throughout his West Philadelphia neighborhood as a strong man, so Raymond Holman Jr. was startled when his dad phoned to say that a female stranger had come into his home and robbed him. "My father's friends called him 'Big Ray' and his friends were big guys," Holman said. "Everybody in the neighborhood knew daddy. I mean everybody. So it was really a shock that someone would have the nerve to come into daddy's house like that and steal from him. " But that shock back in 1997 was mild compared to what would follow.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HERSHEY, Pa. - There was no military honor guard. No flag-draped casket. No politicians pontificating. Instead, the life of Pennsylvania's 36th governor, George M. Leader, was celebrated Thursday with family memories, a haunting rendition of "We Shall Overcome," and lines of his own poetry - as he had scripted his own funeral, years ago. Every living governor except William W. Scranton, 95, whose family said he was too ill to attend, filled the...
NEWS
May 14, 2013
By Tedford J. Taylor No topic is a less likely conversation-starter than our eventual deaths. Still, there is a lot to talk about. When polled, about 90 percent of people presented with end-of-life scenarios prefer the prospect of dying at home with family and a plan for treatment for comfort, rather than unlimited care in an intensive care unit (ICU). Does that surprise anyone? Nearly 40 years ago, the parents of Karen Ann Quinlan, distraught as they watched machines keep their daughter alive, launched a court battle in New Jersey to discontinue care they believed only prolonged their family agony.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ryan Flinn, Bloomberg News
The cost of caring for dementia patients has reached $109 billion annually, exceeding that for heart disease and cancer, and will double by the time the youngest baby boomers reach their 70s, according to a study. Dementia is characterized by a group of symptoms that prevent people from carrying out the tasks of daily living. Reduced mental function makes it impossible for them to do things like keep track of medications or finances. In more severe cases, patients lose the ability to handle basic tasks like bathing and dressing.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Nedra Pickler and Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Tuesday proposed an effort to map the brain's activity in unprecedented detail, as a step toward finding better ways to treat such conditions as Alzheimer's, autism, stroke, and traumatic brain injuries. He asked Congress to spend $100 million next year to start a project to explore details of the brain, which contains 100 billion cells and trillions of connections. That's a small investment for the federal government - less than a fifth of what NASA spends every year just to study the sun - but it's too early to see how Congress will react.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|