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Alzheimer

NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
A week ago, Julianne Moore could be seen at the Golden Globes hobbing and nobbing with her begowned, betuxed colleagues at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, waiting for the list of nominees in the lead actress, drama category to be read. She was one of the five - for her heartbreaker of a performance as a brilliant linguistics professor diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in Still Alice . Finally, the names were called: Moore, Rosamund Pike ( Gone Girl ), Reese Witherspoon ( Wild )
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Jackson, 81, and his partner of more than 40 years, Myrna Roach, 74, are the kind of older people many of us would like to be one day. Both still work and are energetic enough to travel extensively. They take medicine for high blood pressure and he has diabetes, but they feel healthy. They like to join clinical trials and know from one that their mental abilities have been stable for years. Still, Roach has a strong family history of Alzheimer's disease. Jackson doesn't, but Alzheimer's is the disease he dreads above all others.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, the search for a treatment that will save our oldest generation from the scourge of Alzheimer's disease has been a long, frustrating slog. Paul Aisen, an Alzheimer's expert from the University of California, San Diego, explained why. For decades, researchers were dealing with a deadly disease that had no apparent symptoms for the first 15 years or so. When the symptoms started, they were not specific to Alzheimer's. By the time they got bad, the brain was already severely damaged.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miriam E. McBride Rawley, 90, of Tacony, a mother and singer, died Friday, Nov. 14, of Alzheimer's disease at the Philadelphia Protestant Home in Lawncrest. Born in 1924 in Philadelphia, Mrs. Rawley lost her mother early. She and her four siblings grew up with their father, Francis McBride, and stepmother, Maude Whelan, on a horse farm in Hilltown, Bucks County. After the family moved back to the city, Mrs. Rawley became a member of the first graduating class of St. Hubert High School in 1942.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Laura and Matthew Reale don't scare easily. Consider that they married 15 years ago this month with no guaranteed income. So when life seemed to be unfairly piling on a few years ago, the Jenkintown couple did what entrepreneurs do at times of crisis: They adjusted. They became business partners, jettisoning what had been the more successful business (hers) to reimagine his. AquaReale, a Jenkintown-based eco-friendly landscape and water-features company with five employees, has doubled sales in four years and grown its customer base to 75, from just seven two years ago. Rough challenges forced the regrouping that led to a business rescue: "I had a kid with autism, a mother with Alzheimer's, and no source of income," Laura Reale, 44, recalled recently.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014
A NEW STUDY has delivered compelling evidence that diet, exercise and other prescription-free interventions are the best way to ward off Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is perhaps the most dreadful of modern diseases: It steals your mind, your personality and your very soul. And once you have it, there is no turning back. On a personal note, I have seen firsthand the slow, devastating effects of this awful disease on a loved one, as well as the family members. So, my ears really perked up when I heard about the groundbreaking study that was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Alzheimer's disease expert at Drexel University is testing an unusual approach to the disease: giving the brain what may be a more efficient source of energy. In people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, the brain loses its ability to properly metabolize glucose early in the course of disease, said Carol Lippa. This is critical because the brain needs a lot of fuel. "The brain uses, like, 30 percent of your oxygen," she said. "Your brain is really active metabolically, so it needs a really good supply of energy.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several years, Sylvia Gentry noticed that her husband, Louis, was behaving oddly, but she didn't suspect he might have a brain disease. Their saga began about 10 years ago. He left the table midway through dinner with guests he'd liked for 30 years - they were boring, he told her. One Thanksgiving, he threw an artificial log in the fireplace, still wrapped in plastic. Oddest of all, he began to cross social boundaries. He'd ask embarrassing questions and hug strangers. He became overly flirtatious with young women.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can antidepressants help ward off Alzheimer's disease? That's the tantalizing question raised by new research from a University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist. She's says it's way too early to answer it. "I am not advocating that people take [antidepressants] at this point in time for anything other than depression," said Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry, radiology, and neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress. Her latest work explored the link between amyloid beta, one of the hallmark proteins in Alzheimer's disease, and the antidepressant citalopram (Celexa)
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