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NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Dissension over a new direction for the Alzheimer's Association has left the Philadelphia-based chapter, one of the nonprofit group's largest, with an even bigger territory. Wendy Campbell, chief executive officer of the Delaware Valley chapter, is now temporarily in charge of all of New Jersey in addition to Southeastern Pennsylvania and Delaware. Her staff will be competing - in a friendly way, she says - with former allies. Six of 81 local affiliates - based in North Jersey; New York City; Austin, Texas; San Diego; Los Angeles; and Orange County, Calif.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
In the battle to cure Alzheimer's disease, the two hallmark proteins that clog the brains of people with the deadly dementia - amyloid and tau - have received most of the attention. But dementia experts have long known that some people whose brains were riddled with these misfolded proteins still had good cognitive function throughout their lives. What if something was protecting them? Bruce Yankner, a Harvard University professor of genetics and neurology, came to the University of Pennsylvania recently to talk about a gene regulator called REST that he believes may help explain why human brains are able to work as long as they do, and why some of us stay sharp into our 90s while others begin having thinking and memory problems much earlier.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
The world lost one of its highest-profile Alzheimer's advocates on Sunday when Nancy Reagan died. Whatever you think of the first lady or her late husband, you have to give her props for supporting embryonic stem-cell research following his 1994 Alzheimer's diagnosis. That's the thing with many of us. Often, we are one diagnosis away from becoming similarly energized. Take former restaurateur B. Smith. Back in the 1970s, she was a pioneering fashion model who was the first African-American ever featured on the cover of Mademoiselle.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Karen Heller, For The Inquirer
Nancy Davis Reagan, 94, the powerful and devoted wife of President Ronald Reagan, principal caregiver during his decadelong twilight with Alzheimer's disease, and the primary architect of his legacy, died Sunday morning at her home in the Bel-Air section of Los Angeles. The cause was congestive heart failure. She will be buried at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., next to her husband, who died on June 5, 2004. Mrs. Reagan is widely viewed, by admirers and detractors alike, as one of the most powerful first ladies in history.
NEWS
February 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Edwin "Ed" Bomba, 61, of Philadelphia, an advocate for the disabled, people with AIDS, and those with alternative lifestyles - especially as they aged - died of complications from surgery Wednesday, Feb. 17, at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Bomba was "there from the very get-go" for those fighting AIDS, said longtime friend Heshie Zinman. Diagnosed with HIV in the 1980s, Mr. Bomba had hearing loss and was partially blind. He used a cane to get around and in the last year was aided by a service dog named Cooper.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Expect to say "I'm sorry" a lot if you decide to try one of the trendier ways to communicate with people who have Alzheimer's. There was a time when caregivers tried orienting people with dementia to reality. That often feels like the natural thing to do. "No, Mom, I actually did tell you that. Like, five times. " But at Daylesford Crossing, an assisted-living facility in Paoli, workers are more likely to just go with it if a resident has some strange ideas. Let's say Mom or Grandma is furiously accusing her neighbor of stealing something.
NEWS
January 25, 2016
Dina Eliezer is the education director at Congregation Beth El Early Childhood Center in Voorhees I once read that memory is what forms one's identity. It contains one's life narrative. A diagnosis of Alzheimer's means a person loses the ability to remember, but does she then cease to exist? While you learn to adjust and accept that all the long-cherished memories you've shared must be relinquished, you realize you only have the present moment to share. This has to be enough.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Joanne Milner Dennery, 84, of Mantua, a Gloucester City kindergarten teacher for more than 25 years, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Saturday, Jan. 16 at Inspira Medical Center Woodbury. A 1949 graduate of what is now Gloucester City Junior-Senior High School, Mrs. Dennery won the Miss Gloucester County Pageant. Twice. Not only in 1949, but in 1950 as well. "She did it in the fall of 1949, while she was in her freshman year" at what is now Rowan University, daughter Eileen Mannion said.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Does Alzheimer's have a smell? The answer, according to new research, appears to be yes. At least to mice. In a study that involved Philadelphia's Monell Center, mice - and, later, a machine - were able to detect differences between the smell of urine from normal mice and that from three strains of mice that had been genetically altered to model aspects of Alzheimer's disease. This was true even when the mice were not yet showing brain changes associated with dementia. The researchers believe this might lead to tests that could identify people in the very early stages of Alzheimer's, which starts many years before symptoms are noticeable.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Dementia can ruin a social life. Friends don't know how to act around someone whose brain is failing, and people with dementia often withdraw as social situations get more confusing. As a result, people with Alzheimer's or another memory-robbing dementia - and their caregivers - can become isolated. Knowing that, Genevieve Ilg, a social-work graduate student who is interning at the Penn Memory Center, was intrigued when she read about "memory cafés," a European innovation that is slowly taking hold in the United States.
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