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NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Debra Nussbaum, For The Inquirer
Ilene Triest found the group a decade ago while caring for her husband, who had been seriously disabled in a car crash. Bob Mastrogiovanni attended his first group dinner in Cherry Hill in 1992, after a psychologist suggested a support group to help him and his wife, Kathy, handle her multiple sclerosis. Patrice Dupois connected with the Well Spouse Association in 1996, when she was caring for her husband in his early 40s as he was declining quickly with ALS. "I had no life," Triest said of the time she walked into her first Well Spouse dinner meeting in Manalapan, N.J. "I am married but not married.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Physicians have been saying for years that what is good for your heart is also good for your head. A large new study from University of Pennsylvania researchers suggests that maxim could be especially true when it comes to Alzheimer's disease. Autopsies revealed that victims of Alzheimer's were significantly more likely than other people to have "vascular pathology" such as hemorrhaging and arteries clogged with plaque. Moreover, patients who had suffered strokes and other forms of cerebrovascular disease had a lower "threshold" for dementia caused by Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After 14 years of Alzheimer's, Martha Fletcher doesn't really know her husband anymore. But Don Fletcher still knows his wife. And his new book, Martha and I , gives readers a deep sense of the beloved spouse, mother of six, and accomplished musician with whom he has shared a life for 71 years. "I want them to see Martha as she was: totally warm, very extroverted, and self-giving," says Fletcher, 94, a mostly retired Presbyterian minister. Still lovely at 91, his wife has lost the use of language and spends much of her day asleep or in a wheelchair in their cozy home at Lion's Gate in Voorhees.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finding a cure for Alzheimer's disease remains a dream for patients suffering from the debilitating brain condition, family members struggling to help them, and pharmaceutical companies hoping to make billions of dollars treating them. But there is no consensus on even the best direction of research, and that uncertainty has affected a Philadelphia subsidiary of Eli Lilly & Co., Avid Radiopharmaceuticals. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) said last week that it probably would not pay for as many of the diagnostic tests Lilly hoped it would when the drug giant bought Avid in 2010.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day is coming when doctors will be able to diagnose and treat Alzheimer's disease before people have symptoms, and Ronald Petersen is among the doctors laying the groundwork for that future. Petersen is director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, which is using detailed tests to monitor cognitive changes in older adults from Olmsted County, Minn., as they age. He discussed the early results of the study recently at a talk sponsored by several programs at the University of Pennsylvania, including the Penn Memory Center.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
21 Alzheimer's staffers charged COMMERCE, Ga. - More than 20 employees of an assisted-living center for people with Alzheimer's disease face dozens of criminal charges after state investigators raided the center Tuesday and uncovered allegations that employees had mistreated patients, authorities said. The charges stem from a three-month probe of Alzheimer's Care of Commerce, 65 miles northeast of Atlanta, state officials said. Charges filed against the 21 involve accusations of abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2013
Daniel M. Skovronsky, M.D., Ph.D . Age: 39. Title: President, CEO, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc. Number of Employees: About 100. Tenure: Founded the molecular imaging agent company in December 2004. Financials: In 2010, Eli Lilly & Co. bought Avid for up to $800 million if benchmarks were met. Diagnosing Alzheimer's: More than 100 years ago, Dr. Alois Alzheimer [the discoverer of Alzheimer's disease] had a patient with dementia. After she died, he looked at her brain under the microscope and discovered it was full of these things called amyloid plaques.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Patterson was a man of firsts. He founded the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary school genetics clinic, the first of its kind in the country. He was the first to identify certain heart diseases in dogs that correlated to those in humans. And he contracted what is believed to be the first reported case of chimp-to-human-transmitted hepatitis A. Dr. Patterson, 82, a longtime Philadelphia resident, died Saturday, June 8, at Northwest Hospital and Medical Center in Seattle after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Judith Wilson Moreno, 79, a former health-care executive, died of Alzheimer's disease Saturday, June 15, at CareOne Harmony Village at Moorestown, an assisted-living community for the memory-impaired, where she had lived since 2010. Born in Philadelphia, she was a 1951 graduate of Frankford High School, attended Marymount College in Tarrytown, N.Y., graduated in 1954 from the Chestnut Hill Hospital School of Nursing, and later earned a master's degree in nursing at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | DAN GERINGER
HIS FATHER stood 6-4, weighed 250 and was respected throughout his West Philadelphia neighborhood as a strong man, so Raymond Holman Jr. was startled when his dad phoned to say that a female stranger had come into his home and robbed him. "My father's friends called him 'Big Ray' and his friends were big guys," Holman said. "Everybody in the neighborhood knew daddy. I mean everybody. So it was really a shock that someone would have the nerve to come into daddy's house like that and steal from him. " But that shock back in 1997 was mild compared to what would follow.
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