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Alzheimer

NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard R. "Dick" Nicolai, 81, of Philadelphia, promotion director for Fairmount Park and spokesman for the Fairmount Park Commission for 27 years, died Sunday, May 18, of Alzheimer's disease at Nazareth Hospital Hospice. Mr. Nicolai retired in the mid-1990s after a career as the public information officer for the 8,900-acre parkland and its governing panel. In that role, he encouraged visitors to tour the parkland's offerings, reported on the illegal activities of tree rustlers in the park, and sat in on the official meetings of the Fairmount Park Commission.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dementia is terrible for everyone, but elderly people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) face extra problems, says Ed Bomba, communications chair for the LGBT Elder Initiative in Philadelphia. Many have spent much of their lives in the closet and fear discrimination by medical or social service providers or even the people they might live with in nursing homes. "We don't have children, as a rule. We don't have partners, as a rule, as we age," Bomba said. Many older LGBT people were rejected by their families and have created support systems of friends.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
MY NEIGHBOR across in the next valley got himself elected to the U.S. Senate a while back. Folks around here were as proud as peacocks and busting their buttons over Neighbor Pat Toomey's success. But sometimes it makes you wonder . . . Now recently, neighbor Pat got up in front of the news cameras to celebrate his vote to tell the Post Office to issue a fundraising postal stamp for Alzheimer's research, just like the one they did for breast cancer. Those stamps have brought in $5 million a year over the last 15 years for research.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
If a simple blood test could predict whether you would develop Alzheimer's disease within three years, would you take it? That hypothetical question got a bit closer to reality with a study published Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine. A team of researchers reported that they had developed just such a test, and that it was 90 percent accurate in determining the neurological fate of 30 men and women ages 70 and up, based on the level of fatty molecules in their blood. The authors, led by a Georgetown University physician scientist, acknowledged that their patient sample was small and said the results need to be reproduced by other labs to make sure they are as promising as they seem.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Gordon Lipton, 81, of Penn Valley, former owner of Two by Four Antiques & Collectibles, died Saturday, Jan. 11, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Arbor Terrace at Chestnut Hill. Mrs. Lipton was one of a few Philadelphia-area women who owned small businesses in the 1960s. She also was a wife, mother, teacher, musician, painter, dancer, jewelry maker, and volunteer. "She had an energetic, independent spirit," her daughter Amy said. "She was a great role model for us, as women growing up in the latter 20th century, that you could be a wife and mother and still have a career.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013
NEUROLOGIST David Perlmutter has hit the top of the New York Times best-seller list for his provocative nutrition book, Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers . He argues that carbohydrates (even the whole-grain carbs that we think of as the good ones) are linked to a range of modern-day maladies, including Alzheimer's, depression, headaches, epilepsy and ADHD. Since we already know the havoc that carbs can wreak on our waistlines, could he be on to something?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I opened The Geography of Memory (Center/Hachette, 320 pages, $22), by Jeanne Murray Walker, I expected beautiful writing. After all, she is a local poet and playwright whose work I knew and admired. I knew the book was a memoir of her care for her mother, Erna Murray Kelley, through the frustrations and losses of Alzheimer's disease. Erna started to show symptoms in the late 1990s ("but the thing is, you don't know what it is at first," says Jeanne by phone). By 2000, it became clear she would have to move from her apartment into assisted living.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Alzheimer's disease has become the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. In recent years, scientists have ramped up efforts to find a cure. But what about the family members who witness a loved one's memory slowly fading away? Written by award-winning poet Jeanne Murray Walker, The Geography of Memory makes us keenly aware of the emotional toll of the illness. Walker chronicles the experience of her mother's memory loss. At first, the signs seem insignificant, even odd: An overstuffed freezer full of items she would never ordinarily buy. A desk drawer full of old receipts.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Carol Burg loves them all, but all of them would gladly go back to the lives they had before meeting her. Before Alzheimer's. "They're my angels," she says, voice pure Brooklyn, enthusiasm equally audible. "I love, love, love them. " Burg, 47, is assistant activities director in the Wellspring Memory Care building at Juniper Village, an assisted-living complex in Williamstown. The Voorhees resident has worked for three years at Wellspring, home to 36 people between the ages of 59 and 99. All have been diagnosed with end-stage dementia and are at risk of "elopement," a genteel euphemism for running away.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
D ALLAS - I attended Bishop T.D. Jakes' MegaFest conference over the Labor Day holiday weekend, in which I participated on a panel about faith, family and finances. During the discussion, a woman asked a question that so many others are asking. She wanted to know what to do about her aging parents. They have little money and many health issues. She didn't think they could continue to afford living on their own. The woman is sandwiched between taking care of her children and her parents.
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