CollectionsAlzheimer
IN THE NEWS

Alzheimer

BUSINESS
October 21, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Laura and Matthew Reale don't scare easily. Consider that they married 15 years ago this month with no guaranteed income. So when life seemed to be unfairly piling on a few years ago, the Jenkintown couple did what entrepreneurs do at times of crisis: They adjusted. They became business partners, jettisoning what had been the more successful business (hers) to reimagine his. AquaReale, a Jenkintown-based eco-friendly landscape and water-features company with five employees, has doubled sales in four years and grown its customer base to 75, from just seven two years ago. Rough challenges forced the regrouping that led to a business rescue: "I had a kid with autism, a mother with Alzheimer's, and no source of income," Laura Reale, 44, recalled recently.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014
A NEW STUDY has delivered compelling evidence that diet, exercise and other prescription-free interventions are the best way to ward off Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is perhaps the most dreadful of modern diseases: It steals your mind, your personality and your very soul. And once you have it, there is no turning back. On a personal note, I have seen firsthand the slow, devastating effects of this awful disease on a loved one, as well as the family members. So, my ears really perked up when I heard about the groundbreaking study that was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Alzheimer's disease expert at Drexel University is testing an unusual approach to the disease: giving the brain what may be a more efficient source of energy. In people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, the brain loses its ability to properly metabolize glucose early in the course of disease, said Carol Lippa. This is critical because the brain needs a lot of fuel. "The brain uses, like, 30 percent of your oxygen," she said. "Your brain is really active metabolically, so it needs a really good supply of energy.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several years, Sylvia Gentry noticed that her husband, Louis, was behaving oddly, but she didn't suspect he might have a brain disease. Their saga began about 10 years ago. He left the table midway through dinner with guests he'd liked for 30 years - they were boring, he told her. One Thanksgiving, he threw an artificial log in the fireplace, still wrapped in plastic. Oddest of all, he began to cross social boundaries. He'd ask embarrassing questions and hug strangers. He became overly flirtatious with young women.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can antidepressants help ward off Alzheimer's disease? That's the tantalizing question raised by new research from a University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist. She's says it's way too early to answer it. "I am not advocating that people take [antidepressants] at this point in time for anything other than depression," said Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry, radiology, and neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress. Her latest work explored the link between amyloid beta, one of the hallmark proteins in Alzheimer's disease, and the antidepressant citalopram (Celexa)
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard R. "Dick" Nicolai, 81, of Philadelphia, promotion director for Fairmount Park and spokesman for the Fairmount Park Commission for 27 years, died Sunday, May 18, of Alzheimer's disease at Nazareth Hospital Hospice. Mr. Nicolai retired in the mid-1990s after a career as the public information officer for the 8,900-acre parkland and its governing panel. In that role, he encouraged visitors to tour the parkland's offerings, reported on the illegal activities of tree rustlers in the park, and sat in on the official meetings of the Fairmount Park Commission.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dementia is terrible for everyone, but elderly people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) face extra problems, says Ed Bomba, communications chair for the LGBT Elder Initiative in Philadelphia. Many have spent much of their lives in the closet and fear discrimination by medical or social service providers or even the people they might live with in nursing homes. "We don't have children, as a rule. We don't have partners, as a rule, as we age," Bomba said. Many older LGBT people were rejected by their families and have created support systems of friends.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
MY NEIGHBOR across in the next valley got himself elected to the U.S. Senate a while back. Folks around here were as proud as peacocks and busting their buttons over Neighbor Pat Toomey's success. But sometimes it makes you wonder . . . Now recently, neighbor Pat got up in front of the news cameras to celebrate his vote to tell the Post Office to issue a fundraising postal stamp for Alzheimer's research, just like the one they did for breast cancer. Those stamps have brought in $5 million a year over the last 15 years for research.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
If a simple blood test could predict whether you would develop Alzheimer's disease within three years, would you take it? That hypothetical question got a bit closer to reality with a study published Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine. A team of researchers reported that they had developed just such a test, and that it was 90 percent accurate in determining the neurological fate of 30 men and women ages 70 and up, based on the level of fatty molecules in their blood. The authors, led by a Georgetown University physician scientist, acknowledged that their patient sample was small and said the results need to be reproduced by other labs to make sure they are as promising as they seem.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|