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Alzheimer

ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I'm writing in response to "Friend in Arizona. " She wrote that after her friend "Blanche" was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, Blanche asked not to be "paraded around for others to gawk at" after she reached a certain point. You advised that continuing to take her friend to church every Sunday was going against her wishes. I disagree. I'm an LPN and specialize in Alzheimer's. I have been doing this for more than 25 years. One thing we strive for is a sense of normalcy.
SPORTS
November 1, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer
DARRELL ROYAL is considered one of the all-time great college coaches after winning or sharing three national championships at the University of Texas. Now, he's in a battle that he can't win - Alzheimer's disease. "He's in his childhood now," his wife, Edith, said in an interview this week at the assisted living facility where they live. "Sometimes, you wonder if anybody is ever going to make a breakthrough fighting this disease. " But Edith, wants to make sure the Royals can help others.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE YANKEES' team bus was on the Henry Hudson Parkway last Saturday when Joe Girardi's phone rang. After deteriorating from Alzheimer's disease since the 1990s, his father had died in Illinois. "I had tears in my eyes on the bus, so I put some sunglasses on," the manager said Thursday, struggling not to cry, "and [did] probably what a lot of men do when they go through difficult and sad times, we try to stay busy. That's what we do. And I tried to focus. " For 5 days, Girardi did not disclose dad's death to his players, preferring not to talk about it and not wanting to distract his team.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON - Combined results from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies on the drug - Eli Lilly & Co.'s solanezumab - missed their main goals of significantly slowing the mind-robbing disease or improving activities of daily living. But pooled results found 34 percent less mental decline in mild-Alzheimer's patients compared with those on a placebo treatment for 18 months.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Elizabeth Mosier
I always imagined that my mother-in-law would spend the end of her life in our home. In my mind, I converted my first-floor office to a bedroom, took Marjorie on slow walks through our neighborhood, and served her tea in our sunny kitchen while my daughters were at school. That dream plan has been dashed by a series of unexpected events: her ovarian cancer diagnosed last summer and her swift decline after my father-in-law's death in May. Now I find myself, instead, driving six hours round-trip on I-95, back and forth from my home in Wayne to Asbury Methodist Village in Gaithersburg, Md., where hospice workers care for Marjorie and I am a visitor.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
For the first time, researchers are reporting that a treatment might help stabilize Alzheimer's disease for as much as three years, although the evidence is weak and in only four patients. The drug is Gammagard, made by Baxter International Inc. Doctors say that four patients who have been receiving the highest dose for three years showed no decline on memory and cognition tests. A dozen others on different doses or shorter treatment times didn't fare as well. This study was far too small to prove that the treatment works, but a more rigorous one involving 400 patients will give results within a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: My mother's Alzheimer's became apparent after she was in a car accident. I should have noticed the signs earlier, but I didn't. Her body recovered, her mind did not. I built a new house with a separate suite for her. My wife and I tried to care for her for a year, but I'm disabled and Mom was afraid of my wife. There was never a moment's peace. Fearing for our collective health, I finally placed Mom into an assisted living facility. It was one of the hardest decisions of my life.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton Wexler, 92, of Delray Beach, Fla., president and chief executive officer of Clover Knitting Mills in Philadelphia from 1971 to his retirement in 1984, died Sunday, June 24, of Alzheimer's disease at Delray Medical Center. Mr. Wexler had lived in Delray Beach for five years after moving from Plymouth Meeting to Boynton Beach, Fla., in 1988. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Wexler studied at what is now Neshaminy High School and served in the Army infantry from 1943 to 1945.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
As baby boomers age, the cost, both emotional and monetary, of a flood of Alzheimer's disease looms as one of the nation's biggest public-health problems. The University of Pennsylvania's medical and nursing schools hosted a conference Thursday and Friday that asked 50 national and international dementia experts to set priorities for future research and treatment. Among the key needs the group identified were: Better data on how normal and diseased brains age. Better tests to alert doctors to problems before brains are irreparably damaged.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - For people with Alzheimer's disease, a hospital stay may prove catastrophic. A new study highlights the lingering ill effects: Being hospitalized seems to increase the chances of Alzheimer's patients moving into a nursing home - or even dying - within the next year, Harvard researchers reported Monday. The risk is higher if those patients experience what's called delirium, a state of extra confusion and agitation, during their stay. It's not clear exactly why, although specialists say delirium is especially bad for an already damaged brain.
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