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NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
For the first time, researchers are reporting that a treatment might help stabilize Alzheimer's disease for as much as three years, although the evidence is weak and in only four patients. The drug is Gammagard, made by Baxter International Inc. Doctors say that four patients who have been receiving the highest dose for three years showed no decline on memory and cognition tests. A dozen others on different doses or shorter treatment times didn't fare as well. This study was far too small to prove that the treatment works, but a more rigorous one involving 400 patients will give results within a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: My mother's Alzheimer's became apparent after she was in a car accident. I should have noticed the signs earlier, but I didn't. Her body recovered, her mind did not. I built a new house with a separate suite for her. My wife and I tried to care for her for a year, but I'm disabled and Mom was afraid of my wife. There was never a moment's peace. Fearing for our collective health, I finally placed Mom into an assisted living facility. It was one of the hardest decisions of my life.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton Wexler, 92, of Delray Beach, Fla., president and chief executive officer of Clover Knitting Mills in Philadelphia from 1971 to his retirement in 1984, died Sunday, June 24, of Alzheimer's disease at Delray Medical Center. Mr. Wexler had lived in Delray Beach for five years after moving from Plymouth Meeting to Boynton Beach, Fla., in 1988. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Wexler studied at what is now Neshaminy High School and served in the Army infantry from 1943 to 1945.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
As baby boomers age, the cost, both emotional and monetary, of a flood of Alzheimer's disease looms as one of the nation's biggest public-health problems. The University of Pennsylvania's medical and nursing schools hosted a conference Thursday and Friday that asked 50 national and international dementia experts to set priorities for future research and treatment. Among the key needs the group identified were: Better data on how normal and diseased brains age. Better tests to alert doctors to problems before brains are irreparably damaged.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - For people with Alzheimer's disease, a hospital stay may prove catastrophic. A new study highlights the lingering ill effects: Being hospitalized seems to increase the chances of Alzheimer's patients moving into a nursing home - or even dying - within the next year, Harvard researchers reported Monday. The risk is higher if those patients experience what's called delirium, a state of extra confusion and agitation, during their stay. It's not clear exactly why, although specialists say delirium is especially bad for an already damaged brain.
SPORTS
June 1, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
P HIL MICKELSON withdrew from the Memorial in Dublin, Ohio, after a 79 on Thursday because of mental fatigue. Mickelson said it was more important for him to be rested for the U.S. Open in 2 weeks than to finish Jack Nicklaus' tournament. He attributed the fatigue to playing 3 straight weeks, and then going to Europe to celebrate his wife's 40th birthday. He returned home to play a corporate outing Tuesday in New York, flew to Ohio for the pro-am and found his head wasn't in the game.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Shannon Pettypiece and Michelle Fay Cortez, BLOOMBERG
  An $80 million national research plan to attack Alzheimer's, a mind-robbing malady that may affect as many as 16 million Americans by 2050, will start this year with U.S.-sponsored studies on ways to prevent the disease in high-risk people and treat it with an insulin nasal spray. The National Institutes of Health will spend $7.9 million researching the spray and $16 million on the first study to focus on growth of the disease in high-risk patients, according to a statement today by Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question : Do puzzles and memory exercises really help to stave off getting Alzheimer's disease? Answer : Using the brain by doing various "cognitive activities" like puzzles, reading newspapers and books, watching television or playing cards and board games does help stave off Alzheimer's. Research does indeed show that more frequent activity to stimulate memory and learning is associated with a slower rate of cognitive decline compared to older folks who spend little time stimulating their brain.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A radioactive compound that lights up plaques in the brain to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in patients being evaluated for Alzheimer's and other causes of cognitive decline. The imaging agent, Amyvid, was developed by a Philadelphia biotech start-up, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc., now owned by Eli Lilly & Co. It can show amyloid deposits in the brain that are visible on positron-emission tomography (PET) scans.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | Stacey Burling
Several large studies have shown that people with diabetes are at especially high risk for Alzheimer's disease. Steven Arnold, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Memory Center, said diabetics are 50 to 100 percent more likely to get the fatal, memory-destroying disease. This has made researchers increasingly interested in the role that insulin, the hormone that's out of whack in diabetes, might play in Alzheimer's. In the brain, Arnold said, insulin is important for cell growth and releasing neurotransmitters that allow cells to communicate.
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