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Amazing Stories

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NEWS
February 25, 1998 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer The Orlando Sentinel and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Call him the Miracle Baby. Eighteen-month-old Jonathan Waldick was sound asleep shortly after midnight Monday when a line of tornadoes spawned by violent El Nino-driven thunderstorms set down on Kissimmee in central Florida. His four-year-old sister, Destiny, was sleeping nearby with their grandmother, Shirley Driver. Trees, including the top of a massive oak, crashed around the modest house as swirling pieces of metal, glass, lumber, insulation and dirt filled the air and hail and rain beat down.
NEWS
February 11, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
In one of his short stories, O. Henry said a certain kid had red hair. So OK, red hair, and you keep reading. But O. Henry knew that if he really wanted to make that red hair unforgettable, make it something really spectacular, he had to say it again. And so he did, without using the word "red. " He said the kid had hair the color of a magazine cover - the kind that stops you dead at the newsstand when you're running for a train. After that, you never forgot that the kid had red hair.
NEWS
December 22, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
John F. Kennedy was alive when Loretta Young made her last TV appearance, portraying children's book author Christine Massey on The New Loretta Young Show. Tonight she comes out of retirement. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE (8 p.m., Ch. 29) - Kim Novak is entrancing in this 1958 comedy, and fittingly so: She portrays a modern-day witch who snares James Stewart, with help from a familiar cat and an even more familiar come- hither gaze. Jack Lemmon co-stars and Ernie Kovacs is around as comic relief (he plays a rather unorthodox warlock)
NEWS
November 10, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
NBC has built a tradition of presenting a tough, serious telemovie each November - such as Adam and The Burning Bed. This year's entry, Unnatural Causes, is the best yet. Don't miss it. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS AMAZING STORIES (8:30 p.m., Ch. 3) - There's no big name connected with tonight's installment of Amazing Stories, which is itself pretty amazing. The story is not suggested by Steven Spielberg, and the director is not some cinema hotshot: It's newcomer Mick Garris. A death-row inmate (played by Patrick Swayze)
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NEWS
December 3, 2012 | Reviewed by Lawrence W. Brown
Hallucinations By Oliver Sacks Alfred A. Knopf. 352 pp. $26.95 --- Popular science becomes more intense, more engaging, and more profound when provided by a true expert. It is rare, indeed, when such an expert is also a talented writer. Psychiatrist and neurologist Oliver Sacks is that unique scientific raconteur, with a spellbinding gift for recording the experiences of his own patients and collecting remarkable personal anecdotes from colleagues, correspondents, and the literature.
SPORTS
April 27, 2011 | By DREW McQUADE, mcquadd@phillynews.com
Bet you didn't know the first African-American to win an Olympic gold medal grew up in the shadow of Franklin Field. Maybe it's because you thought the incomparable Jesse Owens was the first. Or because the guy died of typhoid fever at 26 less than 5 months after his victory. Or because he won it in 1908. Maybe you only knew him as a doctor of veterinary medicine. He should have stood out because he didn't look like any of the other members of the Irish-American Athletic Club. Dr. John Baxter Taylor Jr. might have been the most interesting person nobody knew.
NEWS
May 2, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The home of George H. Scithers near 44th Street and Larchwood Avenue in West Philadelphia gave birth to lots of scary stories. From 1976 to 1982, it was where Mr. Scithers edited Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, until he resisted the publisher's requirement to move to Manhattan. From 1982 to 1986, Mr. Scithers made his home the editor's office for the magazine Amazing Stories, until the publisher insisted that he move to Wisconsin. If Mr. Scithers was going to live with ghosts and goblins, he wanted their sepulchral stench to be softened by the aroma of hot-from-the-grill cheesesteaks, sitting at his elbow.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Moments after bailing out of his B-17 bomber, Roy Allen was standing in the middle of a forest. His plane and his crew were gone, and he had little more than a few francs, a cloth map of France, and a tiny compass. His nylon parachute was still tangled in the trees above him. Remembering his training, Allen set out as quickly as he could to avoid detection. He removed his flight boots and started off into the woods. Little did he know that he had just taken the first steps of a long, perilous journey home from the war. The odyssey of Allen, an Eighth Air Force pilot from Philadelphia who was shot down outside Paris in 1944, hidden by the French Resistance, then apprehended by Nazis, is the subject of a new book, In the Shadows of War, by Thomas Childers, a history professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Jonathan Gelb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The men in wheelchairs were painting pumpkins for Halloween on the fourth floor of the Southeastern Veterans Center when Glenn Makela strolled in. As commandant of the center, Makela is responsible for running the nursing home and personal-care residences that house 304 veterans and their spouses here. He is also responsible for making the residents feel at home. He ambled up to a few of the men as they painted and chatted with them. He stretched out his hand and placed it on a shoulder as he went along.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer The Orlando Sentinel and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Call him the Miracle Baby. Eighteen-month-old Jonathan Waldick was sound asleep shortly after midnight Monday when a line of tornadoes spawned by violent El Nino-driven thunderstorms set down on Kissimmee in central Florida. His four-year-old sister, Destiny, was sleeping nearby with their grandmother, Shirley Driver. Trees, including the top of a massive oak, crashed around the modest house as swirling pieces of metal, glass, lumber, insulation and dirt filled the air and hail and rain beat down.
NEWS
February 17, 1997
Theo Wilson didn't care much for the O.J. Simpson trials, even though they were just the twisted extensions of some of the courtroom battles that made her famous. She disapproved of the zoo-like atmosphere surrounding the Simpson case. But she lived for verdicts, and I think she would have loved Philadelphia Daily News reporter Jim Nolan's description of the end of the civil jury's "three-month game of Clue. " Jim wrote: It was O.J. Simpson. At the condo. In the Bruno Magli shoes.
SPORTS
November 10, 1995 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
As the Atlantic 10 prepares to begin its 20th season with about its 20th different group of teams, the league arguably is America's best basketball- only conference. But how good is that, exactly? No A-10 team has yet made it to the Final Four. A few of the new teams will struggle to win 10 games this season. Some of the old teams never have won consistently. So, the A-10 is not the Big East, which is undergoing a renaissance. And it's not the Atlantic Coast Conference. It is the third-best conference in the East and, certainly, one of the 10 best in the country.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To reach the home of Desmond T. Doss near Rising Fawn, Ga., you take the Desmond T. Doss Medal of Honor Highway. The folks around there are mighty proud of their neighbor up on Lookout Mountain. As a 20-year-old in 1945, the shy, slim Seventh-Day Adventist became one of the most famous and unusual heroes of World War II. A strict believer in the Sixth Commandment - Thou shalt not kill - he refused to bear arms. But he was willing to serve as a medic, one of the most dangerous jobs the Army had to offer.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1984, faced with the prospect of mandatory service in her country's armed forces, Chanty Jong decided to leave Cambodia. So one night, she and 23 others walked across the border from Cambodia into Thailand. But a crying baby tipped off border guards, who began shooting at the escapees, driving them into a minefield. Fourteen were killed. "Some of them got shot by the soldiers, and some of them got killed by the mines," said Jong, now 26, her voice calm as she retells the story.
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