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NEWS
February 13, 2000 | By Lisa Suhay
It has always been my policy to avoid making snap judgments about others. That's what I tried to do with the recent rash of cyberterrorism on the Internet. Reading about people who spend their days and nights obsessing over how to zing and zap people in cyberspace, I tried to understand why. What is the point? What do hackers get out of this besides a few laughs and the promise of three hots and a cot? These computer aficionados have used their considerable computing skills to bring Internet businesses and news organizations - among them CNN, Amazon.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Major booksellers are being assailed by leaders of Jewish groups and thousands of customers for stocking a notorious work of anti-Semitism. The book, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, appeared in Europe in the early 20th century and was widely used to stir violence against Jews in czarist Russia and elsewhere. It purports to be the secret minutes of a late-19th century meeting of Zionists plotting to seize control of the world. Historians later exposed it as a fraud. Two small publishers have reissued the book, and online booksellers have begun stocking the slim volume, which has no known author or copyright.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SOFTWARE GIANT Microsoft Corp. and top on-line retailer Amazon.com Inc. yesterday announced they are teaming up to sell digital books, entering what an industry expert called uncharted terrain. "It's not clear when and how this will pay off," said Peter Fader, professor of marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. "The natural analogy is to look at the music industry, and the difficult time that digital and nondigital firms are having trying to figure out how to manage it. " Under the agreement, Amazon would use a customized version of Microsoft's Reader software for downloading and displaying text on a personal computer or handheld device, the companies said.
LIVING
June 10, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yum. An 11-year fast has done little to sate America's appetite for Hannibal "the Cannibal" Lecter, who made his return to the bookstores Tuesday. The 1.3 million copies of Thomas Harris' Hannibal (Delacorte, $27.95) that were released will, presumably, be devoured on a beach near you sometime this summer. Hannibal is the sequel to 1988's The Silence of the Lambs, which became 1991's five-Oscar-award-winning, $130 million-grossing, Jodie Foster/Anthony Hopkins-starring thriller.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1999 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Businesses are launching Web sites as quickly as possible, hoping that a dot-com address will help them grab a share of a market expected to grow to $1.5 trillion by 2003. But all too many of the companies eager for Internet success fail, largely because they have no inkling of what a Web site should look like, what it should contain, or how it should treat potential customers, two experts who have studied e-commerce warned at a Comdex seminar. Comdex, the computer industry's annual dog and pony show, is celebrating its 20th anniversary here this year.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's how the Internet has shifted the power structure in today's business world: Josh Kopelman, 28, starts a small Internet company in Conshohocken last summer called half.com. Straight out of the Donald Trump handbook, Kopelman contacts the town of Halfway, Ore. with an offer officials cannot refuse: Rename the town half.com, Ore., for one year in return for some free computers. The mayor of Halfway agrees. Half.com (population 360) gets a ton of national and international publicity, including ABC News, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the London Times.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beatrice Ball Evans Landenberger, 94, who overcame the loss of her first husband by writing a novel that was published four decades later, died of heart failure Friday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Last year, after Mrs. Landenberger's novel, A Gift of Life, was published, she was profiled in a newspaper article and on cable television. She had begun to write the book more than 40 years earlier in longhand after her first husband died. The romantic story involved an Irish governess and two generations of a prominent Quaker family at the time of the anti-Catholic riots in Philadelphia in the 1840s.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
DuckDuckGo.com, the stripped-down, Google-alternative Internet search site that Valley Forge resident Gabriel Weinberg started in 2008, is looking more like a business. Weinberg, a 2001 MIT grad, cashed in when he sold NamesDatabase.com, to Classmates Online Inc. in 2006. He moved here from New England to start a family with his wife, who worked at GlaxoSmithKline. DuckDuckGo has begun linking searches to Amazon.com offers, "If they're for good products," to those users "who search for stuff that may be shopping-related," Weinberg says.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2000 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some entrepreneurs dream of Silicon Valley, maybe of starting the next Amazon.com or Cisco Systems Inc. and becoming the next billionaire. For now, Bohdan Kulchyckyj has more modest aspirations: moving his West Chester start-up into Center City, expanding its base of about 20 customers, and posting annual sales that would equal less than a hour's revenue at many a high-tech heavyweight. "Next year, if we can hit a million dollars, we'd be very, very happy," Kulchyckyj said yesterday during a break from the action at Business Expo 2000, a daylong gathering of businesspeople at the Convention Center sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After promising that Amazon.com Inc. would post its first operating profit this quarter, Jeff Bezos is facing his D-Day. But Bezos, the online retailer's founder and chief executive officer, appeared as jovial as ever - frequently laughing that signature, honking laugh - during a tour of Amazon's warehouse and distribution center in New Castle, Del., last week. "In January, we said our goal was to have a pro forma operating profit in" the fourth quarter, Bezos said. "On Oct. 23, we said it remains our goal.
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