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NEWS
February 23, 2000 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's how the Internet has shifted the power structure in today's business world: Josh Kopelman, 28, starts a small Internet company in Conshohocken last summer called half.com. Straight out of the Donald Trump handbook, Kopelman contacts the town of Halfway, Ore. with an offer officials cannot refuse: Rename the town half.com, Ore., for one year in return for some free computers. The mayor of Halfway agrees. Half.com (population 360) gets a ton of national and international publicity, including ABC News, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the London Times.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beatrice Ball Evans Landenberger, 94, who overcame the loss of her first husband by writing a novel that was published four decades later, died of heart failure Friday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Last year, after Mrs. Landenberger's novel, A Gift of Life, was published, she was profiled in a newspaper article and on cable television. She had begun to write the book more than 40 years earlier in longhand after her first husband died. The romantic story involved an Irish governess and two generations of a prominent Quaker family at the time of the anti-Catholic riots in Philadelphia in the 1840s.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
DuckDuckGo.com, the stripped-down, Google-alternative Internet search site that Valley Forge resident Gabriel Weinberg started in 2008, is looking more like a business. Weinberg, a 2001 MIT grad, cashed in when he sold NamesDatabase.com, to Classmates Online Inc. in 2006. He moved here from New England to start a family with his wife, who worked at GlaxoSmithKline. DuckDuckGo has begun linking searches to Amazon.com offers, "If they're for good products," to those users "who search for stuff that may be shopping-related," Weinberg says.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2000 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some entrepreneurs dream of Silicon Valley, maybe of starting the next Amazon.com or Cisco Systems Inc. and becoming the next billionaire. For now, Bohdan Kulchyckyj has more modest aspirations: moving his West Chester start-up into Center City, expanding its base of about 20 customers, and posting annual sales that would equal less than a hour's revenue at many a high-tech heavyweight. "Next year, if we can hit a million dollars, we'd be very, very happy," Kulchyckyj said yesterday during a break from the action at Business Expo 2000, a daylong gathering of businesspeople at the Convention Center sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After promising that Amazon.com Inc. would post its first operating profit this quarter, Jeff Bezos is facing his D-Day. But Bezos, the online retailer's founder and chief executive officer, appeared as jovial as ever - frequently laughing that signature, honking laugh - during a tour of Amazon's warehouse and distribution center in New Castle, Del., last week. "In January, we said our goal was to have a pro forma operating profit in" the fourth quarter, Bezos said. "On Oct. 23, we said it remains our goal.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2000 | By Claire Furia Smith, FOR THE INQUIRER
At iMedium Inc., a picture on the Internet is worth a million words, a catalog, or several direct-mail letters. The Wayne software company has developed a Web-based technology that other businesses are using to connect with consumers. Just ask the record company that launched Radiohead's latest compact disc how it works. Three weeks before the Sept. 18 release of the alternative rock band's Kid A CD, Capitol Records streamed the entire recording onto its Web site for all to hear.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Online retail giant Amazon.com has won local approvals to build a million-square-foot "fulfillment center," with 850 full-time workers and up to 2,500 seasonal jobs, on 78 acres in Middletown, Del., a half-hour south of Wilmington. Delaware promised Amazon $7 million in road improvements and job-training grants to help attract the facility, said Gov. Jack Markell 's spokesman, Brian Selander . Middletown "gave them 10 years' tax abatement, free and clear," town manager Morris Deputy told me. The municipality will make some money by selling Amazon water and electricity from its publicly owned utilities, "and there's benefits to the restaurants and satellite businesses and hopefully a bump for some of our homebuilders.
NEWS
January 28, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you wanted to debate the existence of extraterrestrials, or believed you might even be one yourself, the place to go was Germ Bookstore & Gallery in Fishtown. It offered all manner of lectures, artworks, books, and magazines on the prospect of alien life - and on government conspiracy, ghosts, weird science, unusual religion, and the apocalypse. Germ was always fun, never less than smart, and invariably on the edge. And now it's closing, effective Sunday. Owner-operator David E. Williams doesn't care to dwell on the reasons.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1998 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think your life has been hectic this week? It could be worse. You could be in the parcel-shipping business. Springlike weather, the bombing of Iraq, and impeachment politicking have kept the minds of many off Christmas - until the last minute, that is. So lots of packages have been shipped late. There are signs - at the United Parcel Service Air Hub at the Philadelphia International Airport and elsewhere - that this late shopping has been a boon to emerging Internet retailers, or "e-commerce," for electronic commerce.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 67 years, bibliophiles have been browsing to their hearts' content in the warren of rooms that is Baldwin's Book Barn. But these days, anyone with access to the Internet can get a thrill out of what Baldwin's and hundreds of other dealers in used and rare books have to offer. The Book Barn, which is packed with more than 300,000 books and situated in a bucolic setting two miles southwest of West Chester, has moved onto the Internet in a major way. The move is part of a seismic shift in the way many seekers of used and rare books buy the treasures they want, book dealers say. The growth of the Net as a source for finding used books began cutting into the Book Barn's in-store sales so severely in the late 1990s that it nearly drove the owner, Tom Baldwin, out of business.
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