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BUSINESS
December 1, 2002 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last year, Amazon.com was all about hunkering down and proving it could turn a profit. This year, the world's largest online retailer is back in the expansion mode that made it, well, the world's largest online retailer. The Seattle-based company debuted an ambitious clothing and accessories section last month that features merchandise from more than 400 retailers and brands - including Gap, Lands' End and Nike - in hopes of luring more customers during the crucial holiday season.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beatrice Ball Evans Landenberger, 94, who overcame the loss of her first husband by writing a novel that was published four decades later, died of heart failure Friday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Last year, after Mrs. Landenberger's novel, A Gift of Life, was published, she was profiled in a newspaper article and on cable television. She had begun to write the book more than 40 years earlier in longhand after her first husband died. The romantic story involved an Irish governess and two generations of a prominent Quaker family at the time of the anti-Catholic riots in Philadelphia in the 1840s.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After promising that Amazon.com Inc. would post its first operating profit this quarter, Jeff Bezos is facing his D-Day. But Bezos, the online retailer's founder and chief executive officer, appeared as jovial as ever - frequently laughing that signature, honking laugh - during a tour of Amazon's warehouse and distribution center in New Castle, Del., last week. "In January, we said our goal was to have a pro forma operating profit in" the fourth quarter, Bezos said. "On Oct. 23, we said it remains our goal.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk is: Nostradamus did it again. Truth is: He didn't. Widely circulating e-mail messages have declared that the famed 16th-century penner of predictions foretold Tuesday's World Trade Center attack. The buzz has piqued so much interest that three books about the seer were among the top five sellers on Amazon.com yesterday. Yet people who research such things say the prophecies are almost entirely bogus. Still, people have been frightened by the predictions, because they talk about World War III or the destruction of humanity, said Barbara Mikkelson, whose Urban Legends Web site investigates such stories.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 67 years, bibliophiles have been browsing to their hearts' content in the warren of rooms that is Baldwin's Book Barn. But these days, anyone with access to the Internet can get a thrill out of what Baldwin's and hundreds of other dealers in used and rare books have to offer. The Book Barn, which is packed with more than 300,000 books and situated in a bucolic setting two miles southwest of West Chester, has moved onto the Internet in a major way. The move is part of a seismic shift in the way many seekers of used and rare books buy the treasures they want, book dealers say. The growth of the Net as a source for finding used books began cutting into the Book Barn's in-store sales so severely in the late 1990s that it nearly drove the owner, Tom Baldwin, out of business.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government outsold Amazon.com online last year, with most of the $3.6 billion in Web-generated revenue to federal sites coming from cyber sales of savings bonds and other securities, according to a new study. The federal government operates 164 Web sites that offer to the public such products and services as wild mustangs, oil-drilling leases, a mothballed Coast Guard cutter, and fancy sports cars confiscated in drug busts, according to the authors of the study. Amazon.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2000 | By Claire Furia Smith, FOR THE INQUIRER
At iMedium Inc., a picture on the Internet is worth a million words, a catalog, or several direct-mail letters. The Wayne software company has developed a Web-based technology that other businesses are using to connect with consumers. Just ask the record company that launched Radiohead's latest compact disc how it works. Three weeks before the Sept. 18 release of the alternative rock band's Kid A CD, Capitol Records streamed the entire recording onto its Web site for all to hear.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SOFTWARE GIANT Microsoft Corp. and top on-line retailer Amazon.com Inc. yesterday announced they are teaming up to sell digital books, entering what an industry expert called uncharted terrain. "It's not clear when and how this will pay off," said Peter Fader, professor of marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. "The natural analogy is to look at the music industry, and the difficult time that digital and nondigital firms are having trying to figure out how to manage it. " Under the agreement, Amazon would use a customized version of Microsoft's Reader software for downloading and displaying text on a personal computer or handheld device, the companies said.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Margie Tannenbaum keeps a pile of free paperbacks, three green lawn chairs, and a knee-high evergreen tree outside her used-book store on East High Street to goad the skeptics. The downtown, she said, is on its way back. Opened just two months ago with fewer than 2,000 books, Tannenbaum's Evergreen Bookstore has doubled its inventory, increased sales, and, most important, staked its claim as a pioneer in the borough's quest to infuse new life into its dilapidated downtown.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2000 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a blow to Amazon.com Inc., the online retailer's president, Joseph Galli, said yesterday that he would join VerticalNet Inc., of Horsham, as president and chief executive officer. Galli, 42, will replace Mark Walsh, who will become VerticalNet's chairman. The changes will be effective tomorrow. The news stirred massive speculation as to why Galli, who joined Amazon from Black & Decker Corp. just 13 months ago, would leave for VerticalNet. Questions also focused on why Walsh, who has been VerticalNet's chief executive for three years, would give up that post.
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