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Ambulance

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NEWS
September 8, 1986 | Special to the Daily News by Bruce Johnson
Rescue workers survey the scene of an accident yesterday in West Philadelphia in which a Fire Department ambulance and a car collided. A two- week-old boy was hospitalized and four adults suffered minor injuries in the 4:15 p.m crash. The ambulance was heading south on 54th Street when it hit a Cadillac heading west on Spruce Street, which then hit another car, police said. Among the injured were a woman being taken in the ambulance to a hospital and a relative riding with her.
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shot on the streets of Philadelphia? You might be better off if help arrives in a patrol car than in an ambulance. From 2003 through 2007, gunshot victims taken to city trauma centers by police survived two-thirds of the time - the same rate as those taken by emergency medical squads, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. But that was only what the raw numbers showed. Generally, shooting victims transported by police during that five-year period were more gravely wounded.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Bill Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
The generosity of Woodbury Heights residents is being credited with saving the borough $55,000 in tax dollars. Mayor Donald W. Steward, who is also chief of the Woodbury Heights Volunteer Fire Department, explained that residents' contributions to the Woodbury Heights fire association were recently used to buy a used ambulance. Steward said that because the association needed to replace its 1974 ambulance, the borough was facing an outlay of about $55,000. But when the National Park Community Ambulance Association recently put its 1981 ambulance up for sale for $7,000, the Woodbury Heights fire association, which had the cash available from a recent fund-raising event, snapped it up. Steward said that because there was no money in the 1987 borough budget for an ambulance, Borough Council would not have been able to act as quickly to buy the National Park ambulance.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Anthony Polito hopes that the Good Fellowship Ambulance Club of West Chester will obtain insurance for next year. The question is: At what cost? Polito, club president, was notified recently that Nationwide Insurance of Harrisburg would not renew insurance on the club's five ambulances because there were four accidents in 1986. He said that there had been no accidents in 1983, one in 1984 and 1985, and none in 1987. "We expected a rate rise because we had a bad year last year," Polito said.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
IT STARTED as a routine run, an ambulance ferrying a seriously injured man to the hospital after he was struck by a car. But yesterday's trip quickly became extraordinary. The patient assaulted two paramedics, then jumped out and tried to steal a fire engine before police officers responding to the medics' call for help shot the patient with a stun gun to regain control, said Frank Keel, a spokesman for the firefighters' union, International Association of Fire Fighters Local 22. It started just before 5:30 a.m., when a car hit a 40-year-old pedestrian on Roosevelt Boulevard near Berkley Street, seriously injuring him. Paramedics responded, but not long into the trip, the patient began attacking them, Keel said.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Cheltenham Township Board of Commissioners will appeal a recent order by the state Public Utilities Commission (PUC) that allows a local businessman to operate his ambulance and paratransit service in violation of the township zoning ordinance. The commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday night to accept a recommendation by the board's Building and Zoning Committee that township solicitor Gilbert P. High Jr. file an appeal of the PUC order in Commonwealth Court. The appeal is to a petition filed by Jeff Morgan, owner of Medi-Call Paratransit and Ambulance services and Keystone Transportation.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By Peggy Salvatore, Special to The Inquirer
Maryanne Cannon and Beth Miller were still reeling from an accident in which their Pontiac Grand Ams collided in Northampton Township. Then things got worse. The ambulance transporting them to Warminster General Hospital was hit by car about a half-mile away from the first accident. Police gave this account: Cannon, 54, of the first block of Amsterdam Avenue, Holland, and Miller, 25, of the first block of Kingsclere Road, Southampton, collided at New and Holland roads at about 7:45 a.m. May 10. A Tri-Hampton Rescue Squad ambulance driven by Stanley J. Niedzwiki, 31, of the first block of Granit Road, Levittown, was taking Cannon and Miller to the hospital when it was struck by a car at Hatboro and Bristol Roads about 8:23 a.m. Christine Myers, 33, of the 1200 block of Spring Street, Warminster, told police she was heading east on Bristol Road approaching Hatboro Road when she heard sirens but did not see an ambulance.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Township Council voted last night to seize the Emergency Squad's $110,000 ambulance and revoke the squad's right to operate amid allegations of financial misconduct and abuse of power. By a vote of 5-0, the council adopted an ordinance preventing the Emergency Squad from working in the township, a move that may land the heated squabble in the courts. Following last night's action, members of West Deptford Emergency Medical Service - now the town's working ambulance squad - took possession of the West Deptford Emergency Squad's ambulance.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
The Good Fellowship Ambulance Club will get only half the money it wanted from West Chester. The rest will go to the borough's Fire Department. After a tongue-lashing issued to both emergency-service groups, the West Chester Borough Council voted, 5-1, last week to give the ambulance club's relief association only $8,750 of the $70,000 in fire insurance money the borough received from the state. Good Fellowship had requested twice that amount, and, according to John Gavin, president of the club's relief association, his group was treated unfairly by the council.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The way Joe Anderson sees it, no one should risk having a heart attack or a car accident in Cherry Hill between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. During those hours, he says, there's a chance that an ambulance will arrive too late to do any good. Anderson is a volunteer and captain of Squad 13-1, the group of emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, who cover the busy west side of Cherry Hill. On countless nights, he has waited - in the station and at home by his pager - for volunteers to respond to the emergency calls that come over the county dispatch radio.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2016
IT IS NOT CHEAP to put one ambulance on the street (Stu Bykofksy, Aug. 23), but to have many on the street is a very high cost. There is the maintenance cost, fuel cost, staffing cost, not to mention the cost of equipment, which goes up every year. A heart monitor alone costs $30,000 to $50,000. Then you have the maintenance cost to keep it going. Now, into the picture, you throw the insurance companies, who run the health-care business. Medicare has a base figure it will pay out to certain things used during a call - equipment, medications and so forth.
NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
IF YOU HAVE never dialed 911 for an ambulance - and most of us haven't - you probably don't know that after the professional paramedics have taken you to the hospital, the city will send you a bill. A really big bill. It came as a shock to Roberto Roque, 56, who suffered a severe asthma attack four years ago while at the Asthma Center, 822 Pine St., across from Pennsylvania Hospital. Rather than risk liability by walking him across the street, the doctor called 911 to collect Roque and "drive around the block," Roque says.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
A three-judge panel on Thursday upheld the constitutionality of a law that enabled Cooper University Health Care to provide paramedic and ambulance service in Camden, overturning a lower-court ruling. Cooper's paramedics and emergency medical technicians will continue to serve the city as they have since January, under a law signed by Gov. Christie in July 2015. Ordinarily, a provider must apply to the state health department to offer emergency medical services. Virtua Health, the previous provider of paramedic service in Camden, contended that the law was specially tailored to favor Cooper and was therefore unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When the feds closed Brotherly Love Ambulance Inc. in October 2011 amid allegations of Medicare fraud, the owner's son quickly opened his own ambulance company and picked up where his mother had left off. For a while, anyway. Bassem Kuran, who also was a driver for Brotherly Love, is to be arraigned this month for making false statements in a healthcare matter, related to his operation of VIP Ambulance Inc. For years, teams of federal officials have been trying to stamp out this "whack-a-mole" pattern of one fraudulent ambulance operator shutting down only to have another - sometimes headed by a friend or family member - replace it. But since 2014, authorities have hit on an effective strategy.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The owner of a defunct Northeast Philadelphia ambulance company was charged with Medicare fraud for transporting patients who could walk and did not meet the federal program's requirements for ambulance services, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania said Monday. Bassem Kuran, who was the sole owner of VIP Ambulance Inc., applied to participate in Medicare in October 2011, soon after his previous employer, Brotherly Love Ambulance Inc. was shut down for the same type of fraud.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016
The size of ambulance operators in the Phila. region quickly drops off, limiting the number of companies that can serve large systems.                                                             No. of Ambulance service*                     City                  vehicles Philadelphia Fire Department            Philadelphia               88 Keystone Quality Transport               Springfield               46 Falck/Lifestar Response                  Plymouth Meeting       44 American Medical Response            Philadelphia               24 Romed Ambulance                     Philadelphia               19 Crozer Emergency Medical Services      Upland                  19 United Medical Transport               Philadelphia               16 Patriot Ambulance                     Philadelphia               15 AMEX Ambulance                        Warminster               14 Second Alarmer's Rescue Squad         Willow Grove             13 *Includes emergency and nonemergency providers.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
In the Philadelphia region the business of moving patients by ambulance is on financial life support. The industry is reeling, operators say, because of poor pay from hospitals and private health insurers, a sharp rise in Medicaid patients, and efforts to squeeze bad operators out of the business of nonemergency care. The latest evidence of trouble, and a sign of broader industry turmoil, is the recent decision by Falck, the second-largest U.S. ambulance operator, to end operations in Pennsylvania on June 30. "The reason we're leaving is strictly related to reimbursement.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
An ambulance company that provides services to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Main Line Health, and Crozer-Keystone Health System plans to close up shop June 30. The company, Falck USA, an arm of a Danish company that operates in the Philadelphia region as LifeStar Response, blamed low reimbursement rates. "Without proper compensation from those who ultimately pay for the services we provide, we are unable to sustain providing high caliber ambulance and medical transportation in a timely, reliable and safe manner," Falck USA's regional chief executive, Charles Maymon, said in a letter to employees Monday.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Charles Prozzillo's life changed for the worse when Medicare stopped paying for his ambulance rides to dialysis a year ago. The 72-year-old Fort Washington man, who had been a hairdresser with his own salon and volunteer firefighter in younger days, was being treated for late stages of kidney failure. Three times a week for five years, he had gone to a dialysis facility to have his blood cleansed of waste, a job his kidneys could no longer do. The sessions gave him cramps and tired him, but they kept him alive.
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