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Amelia Earhart

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In The Aviator, Martin Scorsese mythologized Howard Hughes as a 20th-century Icarus who, scorched by the sun, plummeted to earth. In Amelia, director Mira Nair presents Amelia Earhart, legendary aviatrix, as a female Odysseus who navigates uncharted territory while a patient spouse knits his brow until she returns. Though this traditional story about a defiantly nontraditional woman doesn't always soar, it fits Hilary Swank, its producer/star, like a jumpsuit. She and Nair thrill to the life of this American who broke records, hearts, and boundaries.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer's $2.2 million search for Amelia Earhart's plane was about 2,000 miles off, if Australian David Billings is right. In 1945, an Australian army unit came across an engine in dense jungle on New Britain, a western Pacific island now part of Papua New Guinea. The aircraft engineer believes it was one of Earhart's engines because numbers handwritten on a map, supposedly by a member of that unit, correspond to an an engine from Earhart's Lockheed Model 10 Electra. The plane vanished in July 1937, as the famous flier and navigator Fred Noonan were over the Pacific, trying to finish up a round-the-world flight.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
"Amelia" tells the story of pioneering aviator Amelia Earhart with a style that is anything but. Glossy, stodgy and unfailingly conventional, "Amelia" sets out to inspire an audience but never feels inspired itself. Signs of trouble surface early, when Amelia (Hilary Swank) meets promoter and future husband George Putnam (Richard Gere), who makes a windy speech that includes the lines "let me be frank" and "let me be perfectly clear. " He doesn't say "let me be redundant," but then he doesn't have to. Characters fight throughout "Amelia" with the grand speeches and exposition that often dog the biopic.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The giant coconut crabs threatened to steal the show, since they may have carted off most of Amelia Earhart's bones. But at the very end of last night's Discovery Channel special - a chronicling of setbacks and false alarms during a $2.2 million mid-Pacific search in July for the famed aviator's plane - a photograph was shown of possible wreckage. Supposedly the underwater image shows what could be a pulley, a fender and a wheel. "Breaking News. Debris Field Found," now proclaims TIGHAR.org, home page of the Delaware-based group behind the expedition.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | By Larry Williams, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Sixty years ago this spring, Amelia Earhart stuffed herself in the cabin of a noisy, overweight Lockheed Electra 10E and set out on an adventure that has become a part of American myth. Now, Linda Finch, a pilot and aviation historian, hopes to complete that odyssey, which ended tragically with Earhart's disappearance in the vast Pacific, by circling the world in a lovingly restored Electra. Finch says people talk with her almost everywhere she goes about how Amelia Earhart has touched their imagination.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The clues are tantalizing but inconclusive: a piece of airplane fuselage, the remains of a woman's shoe, the cap of an old medicine bottle, reports of human bones. But now Richard Gillespie thinks he has the "smoking gun" in the mystery surrounding the disappearance of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, on July 2, 1937: an airplane engine. After devoting 10 years, $1.5 million and four previous expeditions to the pioneering pilot who was attempting to become the first woman to fly around the world, Gillespie believes he is close to solving one of aviation's greatest mysteries.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Jay Clarke FOR THE INQUIRER
When Johnny Mercer wrote the lyrics to the hit song "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe," he probably didn't realize what it would do to this small eastern Kansas town. In a world that hardly even knew where Kansas was, Atchison suddenly became a household word. Mercer's song dealt with the train line that ran between Atchison and Santa Fe, N.M., in the heady days of the late 1800s when Americans were opening the West. A train line with that name no longer exists, but Atchison, which lies 54 miles north of Kansas City, Mo., is thriving - and not just because of the railroad that once ran there.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In spring 1931, hopes of jump-starting her stalled career brought Amelia Earhart to this region, where she hoped to set new records that would establish her as a leading aviatrix. The site of her record was Pitcairn Field, Willow Grove, and the aircraft involved was called the autogiro. The autogiro, built by Juan de la Cierva, was actually half airplane and half helicopter. In 1929, the inventor joined with Harold Pitcairn, a local aviation pioneer, to form Pitcairn-Cierva Autogiro Co. of America.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Sellers 2d, 95, of Strafford, a former manufacturer and sportsman who once dined with Amelia Earhart, died Saturday at the Dunwoody Village Nursing Unit in Newtown Square. Mr. Sellers owned and piloted a plane in the '20s and '30s. He once had a dinner date with Amelia Earhart, who was in Philadelphia for a speaking engagement. When he showed up at the Barclay Hotel in his old Ford jalopy, the police refused to let him stop. They allowed him to send in a note. Back came a note from Earhart saying, "Of course, I'm dining with Mr. Sellers, a fellow pilot - tell him to park, and wait.
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NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
If only the summer search for Amelia Earhart had looked a little to the left. Maybe then Ric Gillespie would be happy. Maybe then he would have found the "any-idiot artifact" that removes all doubt that the famous aviatrix's 1937 attempt to circle the globe in a Lockheed Electra ended at the remote Pacific atoll of Nikumaroro. Not that July's venture came up empty. Organized by Gillespie and his Wilmington, Del.-based network of volunteers, The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, the expedition made headlines by capturing tantalizing images of scattered underwater debris.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer's $2.2 million search for Amelia Earhart's plane was about 2,000 miles off, if Australian David Billings is right. In 1945, an Australian army unit came across an engine in dense jungle on New Britain, a western Pacific island now part of Papua New Guinea. The aircraft engineer believes it was one of Earhart's engines because numbers handwritten on a map, supposedly by a member of that unit, correspond to an an engine from Earhart's Lockheed Model 10 Electra. The plane vanished in July 1937, as the famous flier and navigator Fred Noonan were over the Pacific, trying to finish up a round-the-world flight.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some media reports got it wrong. "Amelia Earhart search fails to find clues," read one July 24 headline. "Search for plane wreckage yields nothing," declared another. But it's way too soon to slap labels, like failure, on the recent $2.2 million undersea search near a remote Pacific island that was documented for a Discovery Channel special set to air Sunday at 10 p.m. "The jury is still very much out on this trip," said expedition organizer Ric Gillespie. ". . . "We're just now getting to the point were we can review the video to see what we saw. " Only this weekend was high-resolution video delivered to West Coast forensic imagining specialist Jeff Glickman for analysis, said Gillespie, executive director of a The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next few weeks might finally reveal what happened to the Amelia Earhart's attempted round-the-world flight 75 years ago. A $2.2 million expedition to a remote Pacific island is on its way back to Hawaii after gathering "volumes of sonar data and many hours of high-definition video," according to Monday's online update from TIGHAR, the Delaware-based group that organized the search. "Did TIGHAR's Niku VII expedition find the Earhart aircraft? It's far too early to say," reads the latest report at www.tighar.org . "Big pieces of airplane wreckage were not immediately apparent, but after 75 years in Nikumaroro's severe and unstable underwater environment, that is hardly surprising.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the 25 years he's been investigating the disappearance of famed aviator Amelia Earhart, Ric Gillespie has gotten little traction. Experts and various self-proclaimed skeptics have dismissed, doubted, and debunked his theory that she and her navigator did not plunge into the vastness of the Pacific, but instead lived as castaways on a pinpoint of land called Nikumaroro. A smudge in a 74-year-old photograph turned everything around. A forensic analyst in Washington thought it looked more like an object than a photographic defect.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
2 craft to explore moon's mysteries CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A pair of spacecraft rocketed toward the moon Saturday on the first mission dedicated to measuring lunar gravity and determining what's inside Earth's orbiting companion - all the way down to the core. NASA launched the near identical probes - named Grail-A and Grail-B - aboard a relatively small Delta II rocket to save money. It will take close to four months for the spacecraft to reach the moon, a long, roundabout journey.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Whatever it is - a chamber musical? operatic vaudeville? - Take Flight at Princeton's McCarter Theatre is enthralling. Taking flight as its subject and legendary aviators as its characters, it tunefully explores obsession through the interwoven stories of the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart. With a complicated book by John Weidman (no wonder the show kept reminding me of his Sondheim collaborations Pacific Overtures and Road Show), edgy music by David Shire, who saves soaring melody for when he really needs it, and Richard Maltby Jr.'s sometimes clever, sometimes thrilling lyrics, Take Flight is an exciting work.
NEWS
November 8, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In September 1932, an airplane set off from Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn, N.Y., attempting a nonstop flight to Rome. Four months before, Amelia Earhart had become the first woman - and only the second pilot after Charles Lindbergh in 1927 - to fly solo across the Atlantic. The September flight carried a pilot, a physician, and a nurse. All were lost at sea. The nurse had replaced Ida Mae Hampton of Northfield, N.J., near Atlantic City, who had declined an invitation to copilot what newspapers at the time called the "American Nurse" flight.
NEWS
October 29, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The movie Amelia shows the legendary aviation pioneer at the height of her career. But here's a little-known snippet of Earhart's bio: Before becoming the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, she attended a finishing school in our neck of the woods. Letters, documents and artifacts from the Ogontz School for Young Ladies, which is now the site of Penn State Abington, offer a glimpse of a girl on her way to breaking barriers of speed, distance and gender. In a school dedicated to shaping the daughters of highest society into proper debutantes, "Amelia was the most illustrious of the alumnae," said Lillian Hansberry, archive coordinator, who will discuss Earhart's local connection in a Nov. 8 program on campus, "Amelia Earhart: From the Ogontz School to Worldwide Fame.
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