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BUSINESS
November 7, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cyber Promotions Inc., the company fighting to send "junk" e-mail to subscribers of America Online, filed a motion in federal court in Philadelphia yesterday accusing the Virginia-based online service of unfair competition. The move came two days after U.S. District Judge Charles R. Weiner ruled that Cyber Promotions, a local company, has no constitutional right to send unsolicited e-mail, and that AOL was free to block bulk mailings - sometimes called "spam" - to hundreds of thousands of AOL's nearly 7 million members.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gelles contributed to this report
Hey, America Online subscribers! CompuServe will have a message for you during the Super Bowl. The No. 2 online service is running a commercial titled "Busy Signal. " That would be what many people say they get, over and over, when trying to access America Online, even as the computer service continues to sign up new subscribers. "The most difficult thing was listening to the busy signal . . . and hearing an ad for AOL on the TV right next to the computer," Gary Arlen, an Internet industry analyst in Bethesda, Md., said in an interview.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The FBI yesterday delivered search warrants to America Online in a hunt for a digital trail left by the alleged killers in the Littleton, Colo., school shootings. Both of the suspects, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, apparently had accounts and user profiles on the giant online service, and Harris was believed by law enforcement officials to be the author of a Web page of violent song lyrics and drawings of guns and devils. The Web page carried the title "REB's words of Wisdom, if you don't like it, I'll kill you. " An FBI spokesman, Gary Gomez, said his agency was in search of material in connection with the page, but he declined to comment on what other online material might be sought, or how it figured in the investigation.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1995 | By David I. Turner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's September, and the kids are back in school. Now novice mutual-fund investors can go back to class, too, but only if they subscribe to the America Online computer service. The Vanguard Group of Investment Cos. is starting the Vanguard Online University tomorrow with a six-week introductory course in mutual fund investing. Students do not need to preregister for the course, nor pay any fees other than America Online connection charges. Each week, America Online subscribers can go to that service's Vanguard site and get about an hour's worth of reading material about mutual fund investing, according to Brian S. Mattes, vice president of Vanguard.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is this town big enough for two mayors, even if one of them rules only in cyberspace? America Online thinks so. The Virginia-based commercial online service is searching for someone to serve as the first mayor of Digital City Philadelphia, a new area on its 5.5-million-member computer landscape of virtual malls and chat rooms. "Only somebody who understands what the city is all about is going to be able to be the mayor of Digital City Philadelphia," AOL spokeswoman Judy Tashbook said yesterday.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betty Chandler of Runnemede, N.J., knew just what to do when she walked to the bank of computers where America Online Inc. was showing off its new software here at the Internet World trade show. Mouse in hand, Chandler navigated straight to her favorite chat room, Chat About the Web, and typed in greetings to pals who were also online. Some of them happened to be just a few feet away at other computers in the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, where the trade show was held last week.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a bid to add customers by providing regional news and other local content, America Online said yesterday that it would formally launch an area called Digital City Philadelphia on its service in mid-September. The online service, headquartered in Virginia, said it was in a drive to be the leading provider of interactive computer services with local news, entertainment listings, personal and classified ads and chat rooms. The Digital City format puts AOL in competition with a growing industry of local online content providers, such as the online versions of local newspapers such as The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News, as well as with Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1996 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the federal courts already considering the constitutionality of a federal ban on "indecent" online material, it was probably inevitable that they would be asked to rule on what some consider an even more objectionable problem: electronic junk mail. In what lawyers say is the first lawsuit of its type, an upstart electronic advertising company in Philadelphia sued America Online Inc. in federal court here yesterday. The company, called Cyber Promotions Inc., contends the online service tried to drive it out of business because AOL is opposed to "junk e-mail.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | By John Stamper, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an effort to curtail the spread of child pornography over the Internet, a group of government, computer-industry and advocacy group leaders joined yesterday to announce a high-tech tipline that parents can use to report those who may be preying on their children. The CyberTipline, to be run by the nonprofit National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, will allow parents to report suspicious Internet activity by filling out an online form or calling a toll-free number.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Justice Department said yesterday that it was reviewing America Online's plan to acquire the 2.6 million customers of its closest competitor, CompuServe Corp. AOL has about nine million subscribers and is the nation's biggest online service. The federal review will focus on making sure the deal won't stifle competition or lead to higher prices for access to the Internet. Under the proposal announced Monday, CompuServe's parent, H&R Block Inc., will sell the subsidiary to WorldCom Inc. in a stock swap worth $1.2 billion.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public WiFi hot spots. TVs that retrieve voice mail. Wireless-based home-alarm systems. Cloud-based channel guides. Streamed TV. Comcast Corp., which has lost millions of cable-TV subscribers in recent years, is seeking to grow revenue and subscriber loyalty in its core cable business with new products based on the convergence of services. Marcien Jenckes, a self-described "Internet guy," is the man now assigned with taking this new-product development to a higher level.
NEWS
September 3, 2006 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One never knows what one might find while scanning the help wanted ads. Stanley Kozlowski logged on to his computer for that very task, and, months later, the 46-year-old Bordentown resident found himself in the bright lights of Las Vegas, playing in the World Series of Poker's Main Event for the opportunity to win $12 million. "There's tons of stuff on the computer, and I was able to find an opportunity of a lifetime, even if it was by accident," Kozlowski said. In April, Kozlowski went to America Online in search of a job. He got sidetracked when he clicked on AOL's games section and was introduced to online poker tournaments.
NEWS
February 1, 2006 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Mark Burnett, producer of Survivor, to come up with a way to turn all of us into characters from Lord of the Flies. He's hooked up with America Online to create an online show called Gold Rush that will allow regular office pod people like you and me to hunt for treasure. The five-minute clues leading to a stash of hidden gold will appear on all sorts of AOL outlets (natch), such as AOL.com, AIM.com, Moviefone.com and MapQuest.com, plus regular ol' television. "We're having meetings, and a network will be chosen to hide clues in other programming," Burnett told the Hollywood Reporter.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a faded rock star donning a fresher look for a comeback, America Online is making itself over. And to help get that message out, it will broadcast tomorrow's Live 8 concert online via high-speed, or broadband, Internet video streams. But wait, broadband? Isn't AOL in the slow, dial-up Internet-access business? Yes, but with dial-up subscribers' fleeing its service like summer disaster-movie mobs, the Dulles, Va.-based company wants to reinvent itself as a broadband entertainment hub. Live 8, it says, is the perfect showcase.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Time Warner Inc. said yesterday that it will resume paying a quarterly cash dividend, a response to calls from investors for the world's largest media company to return some of its cash to them. The payout of five cents a share will be the company's first dividend since the merger with America Online Inc. four years ago. In the last three years, the company has pared its debt by $11 billion. It had $7 billion in cash as of March 31. The first dividend is to be paid in September.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is America Online doomed now that its megamerger with Time Warner Inc. has failed so miserably? Let's look at some facts: AOL is still the world's largest Internet service provider by far, with 26.5 million subscribers in the United States and a total of 35 million worldwide. They paid it $7.2 billion in subscription fees last year. No one else in the industry is even close; Microsoft Corp.'s MSN online service ranks second, with about nine million subscribers. Yet despite AOL's tremendous cash flow, and despite its overwhelming dominance in the online mass market it helped to create during the 1990s, it has become the company Wall Street loves to hate - punished for failing to sustain the wild growth that allowed it to buy Time Warner at the height of the Internet bubble.
NEWS
December 6, 2002 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hardly a creature was stirring yesterday inside the snowbound L.L. Bean megastore in Marlton, where workers closed up early. But as they were locking up, the Internet servers that process orders placed on llbean.com were on fire. "We're getting slammed," Bean spokesman Rich Donaldson said. "We're setting new records [for sales] every hour. " The company's direct sales - those taken by telephone and Internet - yesterday doubled the total on the same day last year. "This could be our best week ever," Donaldson said, noting that L.L. Bean does 80 percent of its business through direct channels.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Easy to use and impossible to ignore, America Online, the titan of Internet access, continues to pile on subscribers. The company announced last week that its membership had reached 32 million. Analysts say that number includes as many as 26.3 million subscribers in the United States - more than three times the membership of its closest rival, Microsoft Corp.'s MSN service, which has seven million U.S. subscribers. Put another way: Nearly one out of every four U.S. Internet users is an AOL customer.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grab some sleigh bells and sing: It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas, Toys in every . . . Web site . . . Not much ring to that. But shopping online has already become a holiday tradition for some consumers. "At Christmas it's my goal to get as much of it done online as I can, because I just hate the crowds and dealing with the mall and all that stuff," Stephen George of Glenside said. Ellen Kurtz of East Falls said she was nearly finished with her holiday shopping, and she relied heavily on the Web to do it. "I do almost all my shopping online, except for groceries," said Kurtz, 36, a social science researcher at Temple University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In a new TV ad for America Online, the text of an instant message is typed across the screen. It's typical teen chat: "Have you heard Lindsay's new single?" Before you can say "Who's Lindsay?", up surges a spangly bit of pop called "Everything U R" accompanied by video of an adolescent girl performing. Whether you know it or not, you've just been pitched more than Internet service: You've had a critical encounter with newly minted Warner Bros. artist Lindsay Pagano, a 15-year-old singer raised in Fox Chase.
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