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NEWS
April 12, 1997
Teachers keenly appreciate that music programs enrich education and help entice some kids to school. They're a great, sneaky way to get students to work on math, reading and composition skills. But when cash-strapped school districts weigh computers versus chorales, music usually loses. So when a private group pledges to help rejuvenate the Philadelphia schools' bare-bones music program, it's cause for applause. By January, all 13,845 students in the Martin Luther King school cluster will learn about and perform jazz, as part of a pilot program funded by a $150,000 grant from the William Penn Foundation.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For most of the 19th century, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts collected and exhibited European as well as American art. It was perfectly natural, then, for multimillionaire businessman Henry C. Gibson, a Philadelphian, to bequeath his art collection of more than 100 works, most by European artists, to the academy in 1892. Yet ironically, even as the museum was receiving Gibson's substantial gift, it was beginning to eliminate European art from its purview. It had started to become what it is today, exclusively an institution for American art. The museum sold some European paintings in 1898, and 85 more in four sales between 1986 and 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Visitors to the Barnes Foundation eventually discover that there's much more to its extraordinary display than its renowned groups of impressionist, postimpressionist, and early modern paintings. There is, for instance, a sizable body of American art that accounts for about a quarter of the works installed in the Merion galleries. One room, Gallery 12, is devoted entirely to the American artists Albert C. Barnes knew and collected in depth. Despite this, and the fact that at least two American works hang in each gallery, in the public's perception the American artists continue to be eclipsed by European stars such as Renoir, Cezanne, Picasso, and Matisse.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
When Joseph Green Butler Jr., an iron and steel magnate deeply interested in the cultural life of his Youngstown, Ohio, community, began to build up his art collection, he acquired works by popular European and American artists of his day. Then, while a museum was under construction to house those holdings, a disastrous fire struck his residence, destroying virtually all the art he owned. Butler's response: He immediately started collecting all over again - this time concentrating seriously on American art - and speeded up the completion of his fireproof museum.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area retirees looking for an alternative to bingo or bus trips are invited to register for a six-part slide lecture series titled "Looking at America Inside and Out: A History of American Painting," beginning Friday. The series, which runs through February, is to be held at the Jewish Community Center of Southern New Jersey, 2395 W. Marlton Pike, Cherry Hill. The lectures are sponsored and organized by the center and by the New Jersey Committee for the Humanities, which is a branch of the National Endowment for the Humanities, said Marian Reich, who is helping the center and NJCH coordinate the project.
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Darrel Sewell came to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1973 to take over the new department of American art. For 29 years, he has been its only chief curator. Now, with the department on the verge of major expansion and reorganization, he has decided to retire on Oct. 1 and leave that responsibility to a successor. She will be Kathleen Adair Foster of the Indiana University Art Museum, who was a curator at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts during the 1980s. Sewell, 62, said this week that the museum's expansion into the Perelman annex across Kelly Drive would lead to the creation of new galleries for American art in the museum's main building.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1986 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
If tradition is, as some say, the last great frontier in American art today, Anthony Apesos is a pioneer. The sharp-focus realist paintings by this local artist have a Sienese and Tuscan Renaissance flavor, yet are unmistakably of our time. Not overly diluted remnants of an earlier era, they represent one artist's response to our own era of rapid transition. At the More Gallery, Apesos presents his sober groupings of figures (for which his friends and family members posed)
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Whenever museum directors talk publicly about the problems that confront their institutions, they rarely, if ever, mention irrelevance. Their current concerns, frequently cited, are shrinking government subsidies, a concomitant decrease in donations of art and money from private benefactors, and the deleterious effects of runaway market values on acquisitions budgets and insurance costs for special exhibitions. Museums hire marketing specialists to devise strategies for attracting larger audiences.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first reaction of people she meets, when she tells them what she does, is "their eyes glaze over," Marina Pacini observes cheerfully. Pacini, a slim, dark-haired woman born in Colombia 35 years ago, is the one-woman band who, for the last five years, has been coordinating the Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project for the Archives of American Art. Since 1954, when the Archives of American Art launched its initial two-year project -...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Transitions from one philosophy of art-making to another are never as clear-cut as art history paints them. The documenting of movements or periods as self-contained events is little more than a convenience; in fact, fashions in art, like those in apparel, tend to overlap, mix and generally confound anyone who tries to separate them. The transition from abstract expressionism to pop art during the 1950s and early '60s should be easy enough to understand in this regard. It occurred at a time when contemporary art was beginning to receive a lot of attention, not just in the art press but in the mass media as well.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
That an expansive exhibition of work by painter Charles Burchfield is about to open at a Philadelphia-area museum is not an everyday event. Burchfield, who died in 1967, may not be well known here - he lived in Ohio and upstate New York - but he is considered one of the finest watercolorists ever to ply the trade in North America. "Breathtaking," wrote critic Christopher Knight of a 2009 Burchfield exhibition in Los Angeles. For Philadelphia, the exhibition is certainly welcome because it is unusual.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Mellon Scaife, the billionaire who died July 4, left nearly half his large art collection, a 900-acre Western Pennsylvania estate, and $15 million to the Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art in Chadds Ford, according to a will filed with the register of wills in Westmoreland County, southeast of Pittsburgh. Scaife, 82, known for his backing of conservative and libertarian causes, and his support of conservative think tanks such as the Heritage Foundation, was an heir to the Mellon banking and oil fortune, and publisher of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and other newspapers.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may seem a little like bringing coals to Newcastle, but the small show of Cézanne still-life paintings soon to open at the Barnes Foundation is more like bringing a shiny apple to school. In fact, it's a lot like bringing many apples to school - along with a skull or two. "The World Is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne" opens in the Barnes' special exhibition space on June 22 and runs through Sept. 22 before traveling to the Art Gallery of Hamilton in Ontario, where it will be a centerpiece of the gallery's 2014 centennial exhibition season.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
As a teenager in southern New Jersey, Pat Steir would skip school to travel to Philadelphia, specifically to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "I did it so often - sitting on the floor, spreading my books out on the floor, looking at the artwork, eating apples - that after a while the guards didn't even chase me away," recalled Steir, now 74, in an oral history for the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. One early influence was Marcel Duchamp,...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On March 7, Philadelphia video artist Joshua Mosley will have his first show ever in New York. He's making quite an entrance: His work will be part of the Whitney Museum of American Art's 2014 Biennial, the prestigious survey exhibition that runs through May 25. He's not the only one. While Philadelphia has, over the years, sent a handful of works up I-95 to Manhattan for contemporary American art's big dance, this year's exhibition includes an...
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry Adkins, 60, a University of Pennsylvania art professor whose works have been exhibited at New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art and elsewhere, died of heart failure Friday, Feb. 7, at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. Mr. Adkins lived there with his wife and two children, and also kept an apartment in Philadelphia, where he taught at Penn's School of Design. A native of Washington and the oldest of five children, Mr. Adkins was exposed to the arts early. His father, Robert, was a singer and organist, and his mother, Doris, played piano and clarinet.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roger W. Anliker, 89, of Elkins Park, a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art for 25 years, died Wednesday, Sept. 25, of complications from dementia at the Abramson Center for Jewish Life in North Wales. Born in Akron, Ohio, Mr. Anliker distinguished himself early, winning awards and prizes for outstanding artwork. Mr. Anliker studied at the Cleveland Institute of Art, where he graduated in 1947 with the Agnes Gund Memorial Scholarship for travel. His schooling was interrupted by service as a mapmaker during World War II with the Army's 16th Armored Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Ellsworth Kelly: Sculpture on the Wall. $18; $15 seniors 65 and over; $10 students and children 17 and under. Sat.-Mon., Wed.-Thu. 9:30 am-6 pm; Fri. 9:30 am-10 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
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