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NEWS
April 12, 1997
Teachers keenly appreciate that music programs enrich education and help entice some kids to school. They're a great, sneaky way to get students to work on math, reading and composition skills. But when cash-strapped school districts weigh computers versus chorales, music usually loses. So when a private group pledges to help rejuvenate the Philadelphia schools' bare-bones music program, it's cause for applause. By January, all 13,845 students in the Martin Luther King school cluster will learn about and perform jazz, as part of a pilot program funded by a $150,000 grant from the William Penn Foundation.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For most of the 19th century, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts collected and exhibited European as well as American art. It was perfectly natural, then, for multimillionaire businessman Henry C. Gibson, a Philadelphian, to bequeath his art collection of more than 100 works, most by European artists, to the academy in 1892. Yet ironically, even as the museum was receiving Gibson's substantial gift, it was beginning to eliminate European art from its purview. It had started to become what it is today, exclusively an institution for American art. The museum sold some European paintings in 1898, and 85 more in four sales between 1986 and 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Visitors to the Barnes Foundation eventually discover that there's much more to its extraordinary display than its renowned groups of impressionist, postimpressionist, and early modern paintings. There is, for instance, a sizable body of American art that accounts for about a quarter of the works installed in the Merion galleries. One room, Gallery 12, is devoted entirely to the American artists Albert C. Barnes knew and collected in depth. Despite this, and the fact that at least two American works hang in each gallery, in the public's perception the American artists continue to be eclipsed by European stars such as Renoir, Cezanne, Picasso, and Matisse.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
When Joseph Green Butler Jr., an iron and steel magnate deeply interested in the cultural life of his Youngstown, Ohio, community, began to build up his art collection, he acquired works by popular European and American artists of his day. Then, while a museum was under construction to house those holdings, a disastrous fire struck his residence, destroying virtually all the art he owned. Butler's response: He immediately started collecting all over again - this time concentrating seriously on American art - and speeded up the completion of his fireproof museum.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area retirees looking for an alternative to bingo or bus trips are invited to register for a six-part slide lecture series titled "Looking at America Inside and Out: A History of American Painting," beginning Friday. The series, which runs through February, is to be held at the Jewish Community Center of Southern New Jersey, 2395 W. Marlton Pike, Cherry Hill. The lectures are sponsored and organized by the center and by the New Jersey Committee for the Humanities, which is a branch of the National Endowment for the Humanities, said Marian Reich, who is helping the center and NJCH coordinate the project.
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Darrel Sewell came to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1973 to take over the new department of American art. For 29 years, he has been its only chief curator. Now, with the department on the verge of major expansion and reorganization, he has decided to retire on Oct. 1 and leave that responsibility to a successor. She will be Kathleen Adair Foster of the Indiana University Art Museum, who was a curator at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts during the 1980s. Sewell, 62, said this week that the museum's expansion into the Perelman annex across Kelly Drive would lead to the creation of new galleries for American art in the museum's main building.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1986 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
If tradition is, as some say, the last great frontier in American art today, Anthony Apesos is a pioneer. The sharp-focus realist paintings by this local artist have a Sienese and Tuscan Renaissance flavor, yet are unmistakably of our time. Not overly diluted remnants of an earlier era, they represent one artist's response to our own era of rapid transition. At the More Gallery, Apesos presents his sober groupings of figures (for which his friends and family members posed)
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In 1898, then-unknown black artist Henry Ossawa Tanner exhibited a monumental painting, The Annunciation , in the annual Paris Salon, where it was viewed with enthusiasm by French critics and visiting Philadelphians.  The Philadelphia Museum of Art then bought the painting in 1899, its first purchase of work by an African American, and Tanner's first inclusion in the collection of an American museum. More than a century later, The Annunciation has entered the canon of American visual art and the museum continues to acquire works by African American artists at an ever-increasing pace.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Whenever museum directors talk publicly about the problems that confront their institutions, they rarely, if ever, mention irrelevance. Their current concerns, frequently cited, are shrinking government subsidies, a concomitant decrease in donations of art and money from private benefactors, and the deleterious effects of runaway market values on acquisitions budgets and insurance costs for special exhibitions. Museums hire marketing specialists to devise strategies for attracting larger audiences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Glynnis Reed, Anne Taylor Glapion, and Leonard R. Wilkinson Exhibit. Free. Closes 5/29. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Permanent Collection. Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation & Change. $14; $29, $27 seniors, $15 students and children includes collection admission.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2016 | Mike Zebe Staff
The Philadelphia intellectual-property firm Panitch Schwarze Belisario & Nadel L.L.P. has hired Jifang Tao as a scientific adviser to support the firm's patent work on behalf of clients in biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Tao was a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a graduate student and research assistant at University of California, Los Angeles. Tao earned her bachelor of science degree in biological sciences with a minor in English from Tsinghua University, Beijing, with honors, and her Ph.D.
TRAVEL
March 6, 2016
Sticky stuff Pennsylvania. If you love real maple syrup, this two-day event lets you visit some of the state's authentic sugarhouses. Featured producers include family-run businesses offering samples and more. Maple Taste & Tour Weekend, locations in Warren, Erie, and Crawford Counties, March 19-20. Oldies but goodies Connecticut. Only pre-1840s American furniture, folk art, fine art, porcelain, silver, and decorative accessories at this show, which boasts educational talks and a tea room.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Staff Writer
The city's first piece of abstract public art - an iconic 1957 wall-mounted sculpture that once adorned Penn Center's Philadelphia Transportation Building at 17th and Market Streets - now nests in storage at New York's Museum of Modern Art. After several years of neglect, it was retrieved from Philadelphia in 1996 by the artist and his agent. But that is not Ellsworth Kelly's legacy in Philadelphia, where more than a dozen of his works are on prominent, permanent display, and one of his sculptures gleams on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry Berger started college thinking he might combine his interest in art with industrial design. He ended up going to law school, instead, a fortunate turn that led him to a long first career as a business lawyer with Morgan Lewis LLP and a second professional act as general counsel at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Berger, 68, plans to retire from that position by the end of the year - and, when he does, he will have many stories to tell...
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