CollectionsAmerican Art
IN THE NEWS

American Art

NEWS
October 20, 1990 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first reaction of people she meets, when she tells them what she does, is "their eyes glaze over," Marina Pacini observes cheerfully. Pacini, a slim, dark-haired woman born in Colombia 35 years ago, is the one-woman band who, for the last five years, has been coordinating the Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project for the Archives of American Art. Since 1954, when the Archives of American Art launched its initial two-year project -...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Transitions from one philosophy of art-making to another are never as clear-cut as art history paints them. The documenting of movements or periods as self-contained events is little more than a convenience; in fact, fashions in art, like those in apparel, tend to overlap, mix and generally confound anyone who tries to separate them. The transition from abstract expressionism to pop art during the 1950s and early '60s should be easy enough to understand in this regard. It occurred at a time when contemporary art was beginning to receive a lot of attention, not just in the art press but in the mass media as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Barnes Foundation has received a grant of $150,000 from the Henry Luce Foundation to support the publication of a comprehensive catalog of the foundation's collection of American art. The foundation's American collection of more than 300 paintings and works on paper is one of its most significant assets. However, in most discussion of the foundation, the American works are overshadowed by the better-known French masterpieces. According to Emily Croll, director of the foundation's Collections Assessment Project, the three-year enterprise will result in a book that describes in detail 100 of the most important American works and illustrate them in color.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
When two artists married in pre-feminist times, the husband always got the better studio in their common domicile - or the only studio, if there wasn't space for two. It was mutually understood that since his career needs took precedence, he was entitled to the prime studio space as a kind of droit du seigneur. If his wife wanted to continue working, she made do with a back bedroom, as Lee Krasner did while Jackson Pollock was pirouetting heroically in the barn- studio that has since become a shrine of abstract expressionism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Arnaldo Roche-Rabell was born in 1955, so one would expect that by now he would know who he is. But Roche-Rabell was born in Puerto Rico of mixed European and African ancestry, which seems to have resulted in a pronounced case of cultural anxiety. As a Puerto Rican, he's also an American, but then Puerto Rico isn't a state but more like a possession, so is he really a full-fledged American or a colonial, and how does this uncertainty affect his sense of self-worth? Such questions come naturally after one sees Roche-Rabell's exhibition of paintings in the Museum of American Art. Developed by the Anderson Gallery at Virginia Commonwealth University, "The Uncommonwealth" consists of 21 paintings made since 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Every year at this time we peruse museum schedules to see what the new exhibition season offers in the way of temptations. Almost every year, we can find something that sounds so appealing we can hardly wait for it to arrive. This season the Philadelphia Museum of Art has lined up three such attractions - a mid-career survey for American sculptor Martin Puryear, the late city views of impressionist Camille Pissarro and a series of photographs by Brazilian Sebastiao Salgado. The work of Puryear, a highly acclaimed artist of international renown, will be seen from Nov. 1 to Jan. 3 in a traveling exhibition organized by the Art Institute of Chicago.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Latino chic, the fascination with Latin American culture, arts and entertainment that has been snaking a conga line around the country, is beginning to cha-cha-cha its way into Philadelphia. One recent Friday night, four galleries feted openings for Latino artists. Meanwhile, restaurant-goers savored fare from Spain to Brazil at popular establishments such as Tapas (Spanish) in North Philadelphia; Tequila's (Mexican) and Tango's (Argentine), both in Center City, and Caramba (Brazilian)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The public may go gaga for the museum designs of Frank Gehry, but museum directors prefer Renzo Piano, the Italian minimalist who just completed an expansive new home for the Whitney Museum of American Art overlooking the High Line. Since partnering with Richard Rogers in the '70s on the crayon-colored Pompidou Center in Paris, Piano's firm has gone on to create well over two dozen art museums. In America, the notches on his belt include major designs in Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Fort Worth, Texas.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roger W. Anliker, 89, of Elkins Park, a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art for 25 years, died Wednesday, Sept. 25, of complications from dementia at the Abramson Center for Jewish Life in North Wales. Born in Akron, Ohio, Mr. Anliker distinguished himself early, winning awards and prizes for outstanding artwork. Mr. Anliker studied at the Cleveland Institute of Art, where he graduated in 1947 with the Agnes Gund Memorial Scholarship for travel. His schooling was interrupted by service as a mapmaker during World War II with the Army's 16th Armored Division.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art and three other U.S. institutions have joined to offer a sweeping survey of historical American art for exhibition in South Korea. Museum officials describe the show, which includes more than 100 works drawn from three centuries of American art making, as the first such major survey in Korea. "Many Koreans are aware of American artists such as Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol, and familiar with post-1960s American art, but not with the work of artists of earlier periods, such as John Singleton Copley, Thomas Cole, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Eakins," Seung-ik Kim, the National Museum of Korea's lead curator for the exhibition and a specialist in Korean modern art and visual culture, said on Wednesday.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|