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American Art

ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Premier Tour. $75. Closes 8/25. Permanent Collection. ARTime Storytime. Closes 8/27. Wed.-Mon. 10 am-5 pm. Closed Tue. Open 6-9 pm every First Friday and select Fri. evenings. Brandywine River Museum of Art Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry Hasheian, 77, of Chestnut Hill, an artist and educator, died Saturday, July 18, of a pulmonary embolism at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. He and his family were lifelong Philadelphia residents, and his work was known throughout the region. Mr. Hasheian said his drawings and paintings were influenced by the "raw, divine clumsiness" of the German Expressionists. In addition, the work of painters Wassily Kandinsky and Arshile Gorky, he said, allowed him to experiment with the "visually sophisticated doodle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The public may go gaga for the museum designs of Frank Gehry, but museum directors prefer Renzo Piano, the Italian minimalist who just completed an expansive new home for the Whitney Museum of American Art overlooking the High Line. Since partnering with Richard Rogers in the '70s on the crayon-colored Pompidou Center in Paris, Piano's firm has gone on to create well over two dozen art museums. In America, the notches on his belt include major designs in Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Fort Worth, Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're trying to measure an artist's notability, one gauge is whether his or her work is owned by a major institution such as, say, the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Yet, of the 50 or so notable artists featured in the museum's exhibition "Represent: 200 Years of African American Art," only five or six have comprehensive entries on Wikipedia, a site that has become, for many, the de facto first stop for information on almost any topic....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The African American Museum in Philadelphia and the Brandywine River Museum combine forces on Saturday to celebrate the 127th anniversary of West Chester artist Horace Pippin with a "crafternoon" at the African American Museum. Festivities begin with a reading aloud of A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin by Jen Bryant. Pippin often included a red highlight in his landscapes, domestic interiors, and historic scenes. Afterward, guests can make their own art inspired by the artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 39 years ago that President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized February as Black History Month "to honor the too-often-neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history. " The month's mandate since then has broadened to encompass all elements of diaspora, heritage, issues, and achievement. The region has launched a month of art and exhibitions, theater, film, and events that celebrate and illuminate black history past, present, and future.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In 1898, the then-relatively unknown black artist Henry Ossawa Tanner exhibited a monumental painting, The Annunciation , in the annual Paris Salon, where it was viewed with enthusiasm by French critics and visiting Philadelphians. The Philadelphia Museum of Art bought the painting in 1899 - its first purchase of work by an African American, and Tanner's first inclusion in the collection of an American museum. More than a century later, The Annunciation has entered the canon of American visual art, and the museum continues to acquire works by African American artists at an ever-increasing pace.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford has landed the first plums from the bequest of billionaire publisher Richard Mellon Scaife, who died in July and left his collection of more than 500 artworks to the Brandywine and the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg, Pa. The two museums began selecting paintings Wednesday as if choosing sides for a pickup ball game: They made alternating picks. Team Brandywine, led by museum director Thomas Padon, chose five oil paintings: Martin Johnson Heade's New Jersey Salt Marsh (no date)
NEWS
November 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Glackens is finally getting a proper homecoming. The Philadelphia-born painter who helped launch one of the 20th century's distinctive American art movements as well as one of the world's greatest collections of impressionist and early modernist art, is the subject of a much-anticipated full-scale museum retrospective opening Saturday at the Barnes Foundation and running through Feb. 2. "William Glackens" is the first complete assessment...
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