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NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
That an expansive exhibition of work by painter Charles Burchfield is about to open at a Philadelphia-area museum is not an everyday event. Burchfield, who died in 1967, may not be well known here - he lived in Ohio and upstate New York - but he is considered one of the finest watercolorists ever to ply the trade in North America. "Breathtaking," wrote critic Christopher Knight of a 2009 Burchfield exhibition in Los Angeles. For Philadelphia, the exhibition is certainly welcome because it is unusual.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Mellon Scaife, the billionaire who died July 4, left nearly half his large art collection, a 900-acre Western Pennsylvania estate, and $15 million to the Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art in Chadds Ford, according to a will filed with the register of wills in Westmoreland County, southeast of Pittsburgh. Scaife, 82, known for his backing of conservative and libertarian causes, and his support of conservative think tanks such as the Heritage Foundation, was an heir to the Mellon banking and oil fortune, and publisher of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and other newspapers.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may seem a little like bringing coals to Newcastle, but the small show of Cézanne still-life paintings soon to open at the Barnes Foundation is more like bringing a shiny apple to school. In fact, it's a lot like bringing many apples to school - along with a skull or two. "The World Is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne" opens in the Barnes' special exhibition space on June 22 and runs through Sept. 22 before traveling to the Art Gallery of Hamilton in Ontario, where it will be a centerpiece of the gallery's 2014 centennial exhibition season.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
As a teenager in southern New Jersey, Pat Steir would skip school to travel to Philadelphia, specifically to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "I did it so often - sitting on the floor, spreading my books out on the floor, looking at the artwork, eating apples - that after a while the guards didn't even chase me away," recalled Steir, now 74, in an oral history for the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. One early influence was Marcel Duchamp,...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On March 7, Philadelphia video artist Joshua Mosley will have his first show ever in New York. He's making quite an entrance: His work will be part of the Whitney Museum of American Art's 2014 Biennial, the prestigious survey exhibition that runs through May 25. He's not the only one. While Philadelphia has, over the years, sent a handful of works up I-95 to Manhattan for contemporary American art's big dance, this year's exhibition includes an...
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry Adkins, 60, a University of Pennsylvania art professor whose works have been exhibited at New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art and elsewhere, died of heart failure Friday, Feb. 7, at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. Mr. Adkins lived there with his wife and two children, and also kept an apartment in Philadelphia, where he taught at Penn's School of Design. A native of Washington and the oldest of five children, Mr. Adkins was exposed to the arts early. His father, Robert, was a singer and organist, and his mother, Doris, played piano and clarinet.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roger W. Anliker, 89, of Elkins Park, a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art for 25 years, died Wednesday, Sept. 25, of complications from dementia at the Abramson Center for Jewish Life in North Wales. Born in Akron, Ohio, Mr. Anliker distinguished himself early, winning awards and prizes for outstanding artwork. Mr. Anliker studied at the Cleveland Institute of Art, where he graduated in 1947 with the Agnes Gund Memorial Scholarship for travel. His schooling was interrupted by service as a mapmaker during World War II with the Army's 16th Armored Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Ellsworth Kelly: Sculpture on the Wall. $18; $15 seniors 65 and over; $10 students and children 17 and under. Sat.-Mon., Wed.-Thu. 9:30 am-6 pm; Fri. 9:30 am-10 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
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